The A.V. Club's Scores

For 443 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Louie: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 I Wanna Marry Harry: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 287
  2. Negative: 0 out of 287
287 tv reviews
  1. It can hit (Odenkirk, the best curser in the biz, swearing his way through a procedure) and miss (the ending of “Hole” is a bit soft) in equal measure. Either way, it’s exciting to watch Heidecker and Wareheim stretch their legs like this.
  2. Black Box doesn’t have that show’s [HBO's Enlightened] subtlety, but it’s certainly demonstrated an interest in creating a portrait of a contradictory and flawed, but powerful and engaging female character.
  3. Banksy Does New York doesn’t give more than a passing voice to Banky’s critics and skeptics. (If anything, it’s more harsh to the New York art world for largely ignoring the residency.) But the film does a fine job of getting at the tension that each day’s new piece inspired.
  4. The historical cosplayers relish their parts, lip-syncing drunken monologues with palpable joy. There is also an undeniable thrill in recognizing unexpected actors as they mouth along to incoherent rambles.
  5. It’s not doing a whole lot of work to examine the role of women in society, but it is a show with a single and still-novel goal: to entertain women, without patronizing them.
  6. Justified has always been a show about defining yourself, for yourself. So long as it keeps finding fresh criminal conspiracies to wrap around that core--as season five appears to have done--the show will remain a must-watch.
  7. On the strength of its cast, the beauty of its design, and the sheer joy it gets from its homages, it’s the sort of dreadful that’s mostly a delight.
  8. Life In Pieces’ greatest asset could become its greatest liability, as the series wolfs down potential stories four at a time. But if they’re as funny, well acted, and snappy as the stories in the premiere episode, it’ll be worth it to watch whatever stories Life In Pieces gets to tell.
  9. The Grinder is a very good pilot that suggests six or seven different directions for the show that follows--not all of them as sharp or as funny as the first episode.
  10. The sketches themselves are still baring teeth, starting with the fodder for the shows within the Show. The one thing that unites the collection of idiots played by Kroll and co-stars like Jon Daly and John Mulaney is a lack of self-awareness.
  11. Despite its missteps, House Of Cards’ third season is by far its leanest, most focused, and most absorbing.
  12. Sonic Highways does dig deeper than a lot of other musician-centric documentaries do.
  13. Tig
    Viewers need not be familiar with Notaro’s story to enjoy Tig, and Notaro is so likable that it’s hard not to be excited by her success—as the film shows, it’s well-earned.
  14. The show makes admirable attempts to build out the world beyond Blunt, and the effort yields some dividends.... But most of the time, Stewart is on screen, so most of the time, it’s hard to stop watching.
  15. The show’s many battle scenes play out in bloody, muddy confusion that’s nonetheless rendered with reliable clarity of storytelling, and, while Uhtred’s position as a hero torn between two worlds is central, it’s also not elevated much above the larger context of the story the show tells so consistently well.
  16. The series’ cast remains one of the better sitcom ensembles of the past decade.
  17. Leggero and Lindhome are excellent as the sisters, but they’ve also filled the halls of Bellacourt Manor with a cast so tight that it’s hard for any one actor to stand out.
  18. True Detective might be finding itself in the first half of its first season, but few processes of discovery are so enthralling to watch.
  19. In its pilot form, at least, Trophy Wife is surprisingly self-assured and confident, the sort of show that seems ready to hit its stride in just a week or two.
  20. The Spoils Before Dying is almost too well-made at times.
  21. Now, three seasons in, Dunham and her team are better at doing what they’ve been trying to do all along: create a string of lovely character vignettes, with a deliberate disinterest in plot and a fascination with a certain zeitgeist. This is specific enough that it has its disadvantages, but now that the characters have been around for two seasons, it’s become easier to understand their different versions of cluelessness.
  22. Where Bletchley succeeds is in its unapologetic, decidedly feminine take on British life in the ’50s.
  23. The narrow perspective creates the disconcerting intimacy on which Nightingale thrives, but Lester’s strict adherence to it often feels compensatory and makes the film come across more like a conceptual exercise than a story.
  24. The second season is as lovely to watch as the first, but it smartly dampens Bruce’s cultural tone deafness and expands the scope of the series to focus more on Emma and her family.
  25. Pines is certainly weird, but it’s never predictable.
  26. Enlisted hasn’t realized all of its potential, but that it already has its characters in such good shape suggests much to anticipate for its future.
  27. Fargo is a singular idea with, so far, not-so-singular execution, perhaps suffering from the fact that what was revelatory in 1996 might be just humdrum in 2014.
  28. Madam Secretary is not perfect, but it could be. There are seeds of something excellent in this pilot, one that’s able to tell a character-driven story in a world that’s constantly changing.
  29. Ultimately it’s that frisson of complication that makes Manhattan worth watching--the performances are good, the writing is good, and the premise is good, but the complication of our own history is involving and fantastic.
  30. There are portions of the 10-episode first season that are darker than any other American broadcast-network comedy, but not shying away from the inherent gravity of Bruce and Emma’s situation provides a rich shading to the stranger-in-a-strange-land laughs.

Top Trailers