The Guardian's Scores

  • Music
For 3,133 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Hidden
Lowest review score: 10 Unpredictable
Score distribution:
3,133 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    It never sounds like much more than a bar band playing songs for friends.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    If it's possible to imagine a gutted Coldplay or an even more comatose Snow Patrol, Athlete is it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    With nothing musically fresh, attention is focused on [50] himself. Bad idea.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Generation betrays Audio Bullys' aspirations to say Something Important, undeterred by the absence of either insight or eloquence.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Syrupy, multi-tracked vocals akin to Supertramp in a particularly foul mood have replaced the primal roar of old, while their tectonic hugeness has been supplanted by the wearisome over-indulgence of musos at play.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The songs descend the same chords repeatedly and ponderously, as if the band were falling down the same flight of stairs over and over again.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Pop's lyrics about his penis and ATMs are beyond self-parody.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    A fourth album of stunning fatuousness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    There are plenty more wishy-washy guitar tunes present like the drippy, tambourine laced Battleships, the wheezing Out in Space and the sub-danger of Eyes Wide Open; all riddled with Fran Healy's girlish croon. Spare us.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Sentiments are rendered as blandly as lazy graffiti tags, with the music accompanying them as bold and portentous as a light shower.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    I Created Disco is witless and forever tripping over its own feet.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Disc one sounds like the band's Desperado years left out in the rain--damp, shrunken and fetid, with songs such as Guilty of the Crime and Fast Company giving out as much spark as a dying novelty lighter.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The "songs" (a relative concept on planet Mars Volta) sound as though they are competing to unleash as many prog-rock cliches as possible: portentous guitar riffs and twiddly bits are interspersed with all manner of atonal wind instruments and sonic pomposities.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The Courteeners sound like troglodytes on the rampage.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    As Emergency proves, what they do is entirely generic, but it's hard to argue with its melodic efficacy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Every single note feels forced, in hock to a sound and a set of attitudes that date from a time before many of us were born.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    To the rest of the western world, they are the arrogant stars of rock documentaries and Vodafone adverts, and their achingly dull eighth album does little to alter that assessment.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Elsewhere, the Welsh four-piece are merely witless. Utterly awful.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The hilarious, parodic single 'Rockstar' excepted, Nickelback's music reaffirms every sex-and-stupidity cliche hard rock can offer.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Their website trumpets the "pure musical possibilities" of Electric Arguments, but this is heavily laboured hackwork.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Some half-decent anthems and a sweet little love song are shifted further towards the bin by Kyle Falconer's singing, which sounds as though he has forgotten to put his teeth in. By the end of it, you may need a long bath.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Lazy attempts at grime and rapcore are consigned to the doghouse courtesy of some well-meant but terrible political raps.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The Marilyn Manson blueprint holds fast, and all the familiar elements are here. The difference is that even Manson sounds unconvinced by his "antichrist superstar" persona; maybe because his target demographic have grown up and moved on.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Using top folk musicians means everything is expertly crafted, but Sting's Christmas pudding is over-egged.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Too much of United Nations of Sound feels like a vanity project gone horribly awry.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Gershwin and Wilson are among the 20th century's greatest writers of popular music; no one wishing to learn more about either should start here.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Shallow, soulless and strangely cynical, Some Kind of Trouble is a thoroughly depressing listen.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Stretched out over an hour, their solitary idea wears unbearably thin: pretty quickly, your reaction is less LMFAO than WTF? and, ultimately, FFS.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Former child actor Aubrey Graham's much-vaunted sensitivity and introspection is more hollow than ever on his second album.