The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 7,840 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 American Hustle
Lowest review score: 0 What Love Is
Score distribution:
7840 movie reviews
  1. Brandishing an ambition it's likely no film, including this one, could entirely fulfill, The Tree of Life is nonetheless a singular work, an impressionistic metaphysical inquiry into mankind's place in the grand scheme of things that releases waves of insights amid its narrative imprecisions.
  2. The Farthest ultimately proves a welcome and invaluable reminder, in these budget-challenged times, that space exploration is of boundless importance.
  3. Essentially, this is a film about existential emptiness, and yet it’s beautiful and alive, as filled with humor as it is with melancholy.
  4. A riveting Argentine thriller spiked with witty dialogue and poignant love stories.
  5. A delectable riff on transformation, desire and sexuality that blends the heightened reality of melodrama with mischievous humor and an understated strain of Hitchcockian suspense.
  6. Even at its most sorrowful, Marjorie Prime is suffused with warmth, the core of it emanating from Smith in two complementary iterations of the same character.
  7. A taut, involving drama centered around the mysterious disappearance of a young woman, About Elly confirms director Asghar Farhadi as a major talent in Iranian cinema whose ability to chronicle the middle-class malaise of his society is practically unrivaled.
  8. This impeccably assembled and argued film represents a brave, timely intervention into debates around the organization that have been simmering for some time.
  9. While the science behind Earle’s conservation project is fascinating, it’s her natural charisma and infectious enthusiasm that are most compelling onscreen.
  10. The result is an animated adventure that's funnier than "Shark Tale" and more charming than "The Polar Express."
  11. Noah Baumbach has followed up his acclaimed 2005 breakthrough "The Squid and the Whale" with another wryly observed, giddily cringe-inducing, bracingly original winner.
  12. A flawlessly executed character study.
  13. Working with non-pro actors, Hammer pulls authentic performances from the trio that are at times almost too painful to witness.
  14. The film's smart craftsmanship is ultimately less noteworthy than its humanizing, prejudice-challenging immersion into the lives of people who inhabit L.A.'s low-end drug and sex industry.
  15. This intense, painful movie lingers in the memory.
  16. Stephen Frears is in full possession of his filmmaking talent in Philomena, one of his most pulled-together dramas in years.
  17. Smartly shaped and vigorously told by prolific documentarian John Scheinfeld (Who Is Harry Nilsson, The U.S. vs. John Lennon), the film bulges with insights offered by everyone from family members and close collaborators to the likes of Cornel West and Bill Clinton.
  18. An edgy entertainment, the movie also remarkably has the feel-good warmth of an old-time Irish film.
  19. The story in itself is first-rate. However, it’s the very measured handling that makes it distinctive.
  20. A mesmerizing psychological thriller bulging with twists, turns, nasty insinuations and shocking revelations that might have leapt from the pages of a Patricia Highsmith novel, The Imposter is all the more astonishing because it actually happened.
  21. A crucial, profound strength of Newtown is its refusal to rush toward “closure” as necessary, or even to suggest that it’s possible. There’s a striking lack of the bromides that usually abound in such contexts.
  22. Uplifting without a drop of sap, the tale of a boy's obsession with a glittering swimming pool and how it changes four lives offers numerous pleasures and one of the most satisfying and resonant conclusions to be seen in recent cinema.
  23. Beguiling in its strangeness, yet also effortlessly evoking recognizable emotions such as loneliness and the feeling of being stuck in a dead-end town and life, this moody and gorgeous film is finally more about atmosphere and emotions than narrative -- and none the worse for it.
  24. Although the film runs more than two hours, the story is so compelling and the production so beautifully controlled that we are gripped by the characters' quest right up to the shocking end of the story.
  25. There is no denying the emotional force that this film develops, and for that, we can credit talented filmmakers and two stars working at the height of their powers.
  26. Kent and editor Simon Njoo show maturity and trust in their material, expertly building tension through the insidious modulation from naturalistic dysfunctional family drama to all-out boogeyman terror.
  27. Just about everything about this film is winning and gratifying.
  28. This is the mother lode all action/suspense directors search for and Lee, who usually doesn't work in that genre, has hit it.
  29. This deeply humanistic, profoundly touching work representing independent cinema at its finest should be seen by far wider audiences.
  30. The Lost City of Z is a rare piece of contemporary classical cinema; its virtues of methodical storytelling, traditional style and obsessive theme are ones that would have been recognized and embraced anytime from the 1930s through the 1970s.

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