The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,235 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Wanted
Lowest review score: 0 Dirty Love
Score distribution:
5,235 movie reviews
  1. National Gallery feels closer to a pure aesthetic investigation than an organizational exposé, and in that respect is reminiscent of recent Paris-set films like Crazy Horse or La Danse, mostly allowing the art to speak for itself.
  2. Smart, visually appealing, and consistently engaging.
  3. It's a sympathetic portrait of a complex man driven by an anger that still bubbles beneath the surface.
  4. Kimberly's ground-zero home video of the storm is what really makes the film exceptional, although much of it is of such rough quality and execution that it struggles to hold up on the big screen.
  5. Wild Tales opens and closes with a bang, and at its best is a riotously funny and cathartic exorcism of the frustrations of contemporary life.
  6. Teaming with Depp, his long-time alter ego, Burton makes Sweeney a smoldering dark pit of fury and hate that consumes itself. With his sturdy acting and surprisingly good voice, Depp is a Sweeney Todd for the ages.
  7. Sweet Dreams delivers a rare uplifting story from a country that has seen more than its share of brutality and heartache.
  8. Because Cutie and Boxer resists easy sentimentality, its view of life and love is all the more powerful.
  9. Tracing the rise of digital movies via a wealth of charts, clips and candid testimonies, this Keanu Reeves-produced and narrated investigation offers a thorough analysis of what's very likely the most important cinematic development since the advent of sound.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The main drawback to this noble effort, just nominated for the foreign-language Oscar, is that the two-hour film is unrelievedly grim and tense.
  10. While the pleasures of the brief (65 minutes) Viola are modest, it displays an imagination and stylishness that marks the young filmmaker as someone to watch.
  11. All of the key creative personnel contribute to the movie's nail-biting tension and unexpectedly moving finale. Jon Harris's editing is matchless, and Rahman's score effectively heightens the emotion. Ultimately, however, it is the talents of Boyle and Franco that sock this movie home.
  12. Spicing up the entire package is a screenplay by Canet and Philippe Lefebvre that bristles with wit and energy.
  13. Although the film runs more than two hours, the story is so compelling and the production so beautifully controlled that we are gripped by the characters' quest right up to the shocking end of the story.
  14. As intensely personal and deeply felt as it is, however, Davies' attempt to breathe new life into Rattigan's 1952 play is a rather bloodless, suffocating thing, lent tragic passion more by its use of Samuel Barber's Violin Concerto than by anything achieved by his star Rachel Weisz and her leading man.
  15. Not only a great cautionary tale, it's a civics lesson that should be seen by every concerned citizen.
  16. Very much a work of its time, the documentary offers unique perspectives for fans of both the saxophonist and the pioneering filmmaker, but is unlikely to attract a broad audience beyond those camps.
  17. An elegy for the days when Taiwan was a major East Asian film production center.
  18. A newcomer to film, Michaletos grew up on a farm with cheetahs, so he can act natural around the animals while making this Huck Finn-like character more than credible.
  19. His (Fernando Meirelles) impressionistic, guerilla style of filmmaking works surprisingly well in capturing the hypnotic urgency of le Carre's fiction. And his viewpoint is less British and more Third World.
  20. A genuinely moving look at life in a group foster home that avoids most of the usual routes into viewers' hearts.
  21. Uses dark humor, incisive characterizations and social commentary to infuse its familiar detective tale with a distinctive flair.
  22. Atmospheric but pedestrian, it is a retelling of the classic tragedy of all civil wars, from the U.S. to Vietnam to England, where brother is pitched against brother.
  23. Turns Jane Austen's nimble satire into a lumbering gothic romance.
  24. The film hits another comic mother lode in the byplay between Black and Cusack.
  25. It is hard to imagine a better cast or production values so the film should find audiences among sophisticated urban adults.
  26. The director mixes moods with a playfulness that is both brazen and carefree and yet precisely modulated, yielding results that amplify the specific content of the screenplay. This makes for a film that, however cheap it was to make, is incredibly rich to watch.
  27. Trite, grim and feebly provocative.
  28. This deeply humanistic, profoundly touching work representing independent cinema at its finest should be seen by far wider audiences.
  29. [A Hijacking] illuminatingly and sensitively dramatizes an easily-overlooked global crime phenomenon.

Top Trailers