The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,574 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Top Of The Lake
Lowest review score: 0 Mixology: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 840
  2. Negative: 0 out of 840
840 tv reviews
  1. It isn't as groundbreaking as it would have itself taken. However, in terms of presenting a strong portrayal of cop work out on the urban landscape, the project (inspired by David Simon's "Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets") hits with compelling conviction. [29 Jan 1993]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  2. What makes Rectify so rich and compelling are the choices it makes to avoid predictability--not just in its bold choice of immersive pacing, but because it puts characters (and complicated ones) into what feels like a familiar story and makes it seem new.
  3. Mad Men stays relevant and exciting by moving forward.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If anything, "Home Improvement" promises to be even more impressive in this, its sophomore year. ... Across the board, the show's stars have found greater comfort in their characters and are able to give them an easy, believable air and friendliness. [16 Sep 1992]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  4. UK remakes the script in its own, veddy British image and comes up with a vibrant, layered, insightful look at how the system breaks down no matter what the metropolis.
  5. Every actor nails their lines, which keeps Veep moving at a brisk pace. In fact, the episodes seem to end so quickly, you'll wish they lasted an hour.
  6. Episodes, which got uproarious laughter in cut-down form at the Television Critics Assn. press tour in July, does not disappoint an ounce as it rolls through a seven-episode season. It also signals a savvy return to television for LeBlanc, who manages to be the butt of the joke one moment then hilariously likable the next.
  7. While it might seem that Show Me A Hero ... has a distinct "eat your vegetables" aroma to it, what becomes apparent when you settle down to watch is the unmistakable lure of being hooked by the storytelling and the first-class acting.
  8. There's a lot to like about The Path, from the strong visual sense of place that director Mike Cahill established in the first two episodes to its theoretical take on faith, and of course the exquisite acting and deft writing.
  9. Season two of Master of None is expanding its comprehension of what it can be, the depth of its many side characters and, most importantly, continuing to be unpredictable and true to itself.
  10. Long on heart, brimming with great characters, smartly cast, expertly written and funny from start to finish, Family is the obvious choice for best new fall comedy--and possibly best series.
  11. There are moments in Togetherness where it's extremely impressive witnessing the layered nuances that Zissis and the Duplasses create. Though Peet and especially Zissis get the funnier lines and situations, there's a very palpable element of sadness to their characters as well.
  12. It's a heavyweight new contender in the drama category, just as Netflix now is as a content provider.
  13. A series with grit, charm, warmth and wit about another woman who defies convention to make her own way. And if Heather Paige Kent ("Stark Raving Mad"), who plays Lydia, doesn't steal your heart, it's time for a transplant. [29 Sept 2000]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  14. It’s a lusciously shot and brilliantly written and acted account of how the British aristocracy and progressives in high society fell in love with what can best be described as the tantalizing edginess of jazz music and the sense of exploration and wonder it brought to those who heard it even though society at the time was not ready to accept what it all implied.
  15. Austin packs a sweet, loose-limbed sensibility reminiscent of Jim Jarmusch's "Stranger Than Paradise" by way of early Woody Allen that makes this debuting series one of the more interesting and inventive efforts likely to air this season. [10 Sept 1997]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    "Weeds" is a blast, a wry, well-written look at the life of the pot dealer next door in small-screen suburbia. [1 Aug 2005]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  16. What’s intriguing and partly amazing about the two hour "movie” called “The Doorway” that opens the season April 7 is that Weiner has not lost his touch at writing a beautifully crafted script--jammed with the sadness and humor and personal revelations we’ve all come to appreciate. But in addition to that, he’s decided to really hit home Mad Men’s key theme in the first two hours with a kind of ferocity of intent we’ve rarely seen from him.
  17. Beyond the superb pilot, Lights Out begins to get wonderfully nuanced and more interesting with each episode. And though the series avoids most boxing cliches while keeping true to the inescapable elements of "the sweet science," the real key to its success is McCallan.
  18. Its sharp, wily wit will be immediately appreciable. Here is a comedy construct that hits like "The Brothers Karamazov" and plays like the brothers Marx. [25 Sep 1992]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  19. Pick a character--the laughs are there. Maybe this season we should give more credit to the intricate plotting. But no matter your preference, Silicon Valley is back and the world has once again been made right, at least for the moment.
  20. It's simply a great idea that, if early indications are accurate, could stand as a horror classic for a television genre that's been inconsistent at best over the years.
  21. Superb, funny and wonderfully spot-on.
  22. Smash is excellent, a bar-raiser for broadcast networks.
  23. Creator-writer Norman Morrill's drama is so taut and his approach to the genre so sharp that the only significant complaint is that the first "season" is only six episodes.
  24. The Walking Dead hasn't lost the most important ingredient in its strangely successful recipe: it's thrilling.
  25. Credit the writers and the director--and the various wonderful acting performances you’ll see sprinkled about--for making The Missing something more than just a whodunit.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A dramatic series that is steamy, provocative and filled with smart dialogue and richly drawn characters, none of whom are entirely predictable. [15 Jan 2004]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Although the subject matter is familiar, the stories from exec producer Ron Hutchinson are fresh and packed with excitement and stylistic turns. [26 Jan 2004]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  26. While it always bears watching how well Kohan’s shows keep on the rails over the course of their run, season three of Orange kicks off as impressively, confidently and excellently as ever.
  27. Brilliantly original but wise and low-key.
  28. The characters are so beautifully and thoroughly rendered that we, as viewers, are caught up in their lives.
  29. It will be interesting to see how Rylance’s superb performance evolves as Cromwell gets within spitting distance of the throne. For the moment, he’s a perfect model of stoicism, and the few flickers of feeling that cross his face (a smattering of tears after the death of his wife and children) hint that when Cromwell’s downfall comes--as history says it must--it won’t be pretty. The supporting actors are equally excellent.
  30. Chalk up another forceful punch with Bloodline, a riveting, superbly cast slow-burn family drama set between the oceanfront paradise and the murky mangrove swamps of the Florida Keys.
  31. Forget everything I ever wrote about "Mad Men." This is the best drama series on television.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It commands attention without being heavy-handed and serves up characters who seamlessly and effectively blend into the hour's compelling framework. [26 Sep 2002]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  32. The show gets back to where it belongs: under Larry's expansive roof and inside his incessantly neurotic, disgracefully tactless and unerringly heartless skin.
  33. Bolstered by superb acting and first-rate direction and cinematography, Kill delivers the goods in ways both unexpected and rewarding.
  34. Its simplicity and execution are shockingly self-assured as it avoids being pigeonholed.
  35. When a show makes the grade for a second season and has no loss of either ambition or ingenuity, it's time to get on board.
  36. Breaking Bad is indeed so flat-out superb it appears to be operating at a different level than just about everybody else save AMC's own "Mad Men" and maybe a couple of shows over at FX.
  37. Sly, amusing and devilishly clever. [16 June 1999]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  38. Season two proves emphatically (having seen six of the 10) that the first was no fluke.
  39. The buzz is that "My Name Is Earl" is good, and the truth is that it's better than the buzz.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It shows us that comedy isn't really dead, it's merely been snoozing, and this savvy shot of character-driven adrenaline serves as the wake-up call. Packed with brutal showbiz truths and snappy dialogue, the half-hour is revelatory in the clever way it spotlights the empty shell of celebrityhood and the party-hearty superficiality of those caught up in its reflected glow... And watch for this to be Piven's breakout role. His agent Ari is a creation of slimeball wonder. [16 July 2004]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  40. In lesser hands, Longford might have come off as dogmatic or, worse, pathetic. Broadbent endows him with a cocktail of emotions that makes Longford simultaneously heroic and vulnerable. It is a performance that will likely not be forgotten later this year when Emmy nominations are announced.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Perhaps the only predictable element of Mad Men is that the premiere is a return to form, the series is as spellbinding and elusive as Draper himself.
  41. It's too early to really judge Americans against Homeland, but if the latter is getting away from what hooked you in the first place, then you might find what you're missing on Americans.
  42. Archer proves exactly why it's been so great since the beginning: Smart writing, great voice cast, cool animation and, just so you understand, still more smart writing.
  43. A rip-roaring thriller... that pulls off the rare trick of being both massively intelligent and unbearably intense.
  44. Funny, spooky and wonderfully entertaining. [7 Oct 1998]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  45. American Crime may not leave you with much to interpret, but it always offers plenty to talk about.
  46. The Rashomon-style storytelling takes a bit to get used to, and the sometimes feverish flow of the jokes (which fans may remember from the hall-of-fame first three seasons) struggle to unleash themselves in the first couple of episodes, but then it snowballs into seven-and-a-half hours of hilarity just waiting for a movie to follow it up.
  47. Whether or not "The Nine" succeeds -- and, personally, I'm pulling for it -- it deserves credit for advancing the art of TV storytelling to new heights, both complex and rewarding.
  48. This latest production from Terence Wrong and ABC News is as ambitious as it is thrilling, a beautiful collage of life-and-death drama, raw courage, medical miracles and human foibles.
  49. While Soundbreaking is not the kind of linear, molecular reconstruction of history that Ken Burns might have made--the series veers off on non-chronological detours and then bounces back--it's always riveting.
  50. All told, Transparent is a surprisingly poignant, funny and mature piece of work.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If there is any criticism to be made, it is that the opening half-hour plunges the unsuspecting viewer into an unfamiliar foreign world of soot and grime and foul deeds and motives. Once settled in, however, this is very addictive television, indeed.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In a new season largely bereft of innovative ideas or daring concepts, Firefly stands out like a supermodel at a bus stop... The end result is a new and different form for storytelling and characters with engaging stories to tell. [19 Sept 2002]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  51. It constantly offers more than you expect, and even when it delivers something either predictable or straight from the “women’s prison drama” handbook, it then counters with something fresh or unexpected.
  52. Not only is the pilot a wonderful mix of hilarious moments (pretty much any time Faxon is in the picture) and subtle sentiment, but it's one of those shows where the acumen of the off-camera talent (Fox) is impressive and clear, which gives hope for long-term success.
  53. Gomorrah is dark--both in tone and how it was shot--and it requires concentration on the subtitles, but it's also completely riveting and worth the effort as Italy steps up, via Sundance TV, to prove we don't have a lock on quality dramas.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a wonderful, subversive concept, and by failing to romanticize the players, "Office" remains true to its ghastly, funny self. [23 Jan 2003]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  54. Far from devolving into soapy Madison Avenue pablum, Mad Men is painstakingly building its way to genuine greatness.
  55. It's an absolute gem, delightful and thoughtful, serious, sad and also ridiculously funny. It's one of those series that ultimately bites off a bit more than it has time to deliver on, but it's never short on ambition and the talent to pull most of it off.
  56. Hawley's decision to disorient viewers by making David's unsettling and confusing mental landscape the visual launching point for this world is strategically smart--if challenging--and the skillful camera work has a panache that stamps the early episodes. Stylistically, there's nothing quite like Legion's smart take on mutant powers, which keeps the series more dramatic and less light or flippantly Marvel-esque.
  57. The larger point is that, with all this character growth continuing, the already superb Better Call Saul is in a position to take its biggest creative leap yet. It's not a surprise that we will eventually get to Jimmy McGill becoming Saul Goodman, but it's certainly surprising just how heartbreaking that transformation has become.
  58. Purists might balk, but for the rest of us, the latest retelling of the Superman tale is a brilliant blend of tradition and contemporary sensibility. Not only is it a Superman for a new generation, it's a Superman for every generation. [15 Oct 2001]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  59. The first three episodes of Season 3 indicate there has been no slippage at all, but rather a digging in of the philosophy at hand.
  60. Scene after scene transports viewers across time and space to a place made vivid and real. By doing all this, the robust, two-part, four-hour "Masterpiece Theatre" program raises the bar for future "Jane Eyre" productions to a level that will not be easily hurdled.
  61. The series is excellent, absorbing and addictive. When each episode ends, you long for the next--a hallmark of great dramas.
  62. The dialogue remains as pin-prick sharp as usual, with that clever mix of directness and humor.
  63. It’s certainly an intriguing pilot--you can’t take your eyes off of Spader and the writers have thrown in a couple of other interesting twists.
  64. While a miniseries might have truly been something to behold--allowing the slow helplessness to really penetrate viewers, there’s something to be said about making a big, loud noise and getting the message out--again. In that sense, both Murphy and Kramer do the play justice (as you would expect) and have created a powerful modern history reminder for those too young to understand the all-too-recent past.
  65. Much of the charm in this show, as well as the humor, comes from Rock's ability to vanquish political correctness in favor of a candid but affectionate look at the past.
  66. Think of "The Office," "Larry Sanders," "Spin City" and "Yes Minister" rolled into one delirious stew.
  67. Smart and audacious.
  68. The first chapter of Peter Morgan's chronicle of the rule of Queen Elizabeth II remains gripping across the entirety of the 10 episodes made available to critics, finding both emotional heft in Elizabeth's youthful ascension and unexpected suspense in matters of courtly protocol and etiquette.
  69. here are odd time jumps and plot movements here and there that really prove how much that voiceover narration from Claire is really needed. Not all of these are good things. ... They are not deal-breakers, exactly, but it will be interesting to see if season two can match (or exceed) the lofty achievements of season one. Perhaps the important thing to know is, despite these shifts, Outlander remains as sweeping and addictive as ever, which goes a long way.
  70. In addition to some screwball comedy, it also has a lot of heart.
  71. Although no half-hour TV series is going to capture the visual splendor and sophisticated sound of the big-screen experience, it's surprising how well this series reflects the style, attitude, ideals and spirit of the six "Star Wars" films.
  72. The fantastical creation of Jackie Peyton, perhaps surprisingly, has shades of gray that make her very real indeed. Both show and character are something wonderful to behold -- and worth taking multiple doses of.
  73. A new BBC America sci-fi/thriller that's so good and unsettling and creepy that even grumps like myself can't help but be in its thrall.
  74. The performances of the players are so uniformly terrific that you could do worse than to bring these deeply flawed characters into your living room on a regular basis, as this is a series for which TiVo was invented if ever there was one.
  75. It’s a serious work of television that is angling to dramatize numerous weighty subjects, and isn’t overly concerned with distracting the audience with shiny objects in the process.
  76. Unlike so many adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, this one not only pleases just as it stands but also could inspire a genuine curiosity in many viewers about seeing more of his work.
  77. Outrageous, bizarre, effortlessly hip and unsubtle in magically edgy ways.
  78. Fellowes has a stronger hold on telling the individual tales of his well-drawn characters, and that pinpoint focus utterly redeems the series early on.
  79. The nicely cast ensemble is formidable, but the driving power is the wit and freshness of the writing. It snaps, crackles and pops. [4 Mar 1997]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  80. Through two episodes, The Good Fight feels appropriately like an extension on the brand and unless you discover that what you really liked about The Good Wife was the soap opera of Alicia Florrick's life, you'll find this a welcome return.
  81. Laughs come from all angles here, though particularly memorable gags crank up the raunchiness (one scene shows the Bellacourts engaging in boring “procreation sex”) and absurdity.
  82. Black, a thinking-man's blowhard, carries the concept off with shameless aplomb, while his debating helpers are equal parts witty and wise.
  83. Keough's outstanding performance makes the whole thing work, make no mistake. But Kerrigan, Seimetz and Meizler weave a visually evocative backdrop, using only natural light, location-based shooting and a color scheme that allows for the intimacy of the writing to come out and help shape things.
  84. Logan, who has written each of the eight episodes, and director J.A. Bayona (who cements the overall look and feel of the series) keep things intriguing and fresh, fearful and entertaining. The characters are so vastly different from one another but mix well.
  85. Humans finds a way to bring intrigue to a very familiar conflict.
  86. Where Westworld is at its best is in the deeper issues that will unspool slowly, like a good mystery. Early episodes are adept at getting at the base attractions of the park and why people would come, but also in setting up a sense of confusion about motives. ... The series benefits from a number of standout performances.
  87. One of the new offerings that stands out from the pack is ABC's coming-of-age series, The Goldbergs, which is fueled partly by nostalgia, partly by the great Jeff Garlin's constant yelling and partly out of some outstanding writing. A strong cast doesn't hurt, either.
  88. It's a smart and often funny look at young people looking for love and professional satisfaction in Los Angeles, which is about as common a genre as TV has to offer these days. But taken in the totality of the TV landscape, Rae's voice is one that wasn't being heard and that voice is what makes Insecure stand out, not necessarily as better than the Emmy winners or critical favorites in the field, but as gratifyingly distinguishable.
  89. This is one of the rare situation comedies that relies almost entirely on situations, each of which is more bizarre than the next and at the same time perfectly plausible. It's almost too good.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beautifully rendered as the series is, there's a high-concept conflation of the two shows here in the way it marries the mob melodrama of "Sopranos" with "Mad's" period fetishism. It's a savvy programming strategy but robs Boardwalk of a certain freshness that would otherwise elevate it to the same echelon as those TV classics.

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