The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,048 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Sherlock: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Emily Owens, M.D.: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 563
  2. Negative: 0 out of 563
563 tv reviews
  1. A series with grit, charm, warmth and wit about another woman who defies convention to make her own way. And if Heather Paige Kent ("Stark Raving Mad"), who plays Lydia, doesn't steal your heart, it's time for a transplant. [29 Sept 2000]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  2. Funny, spooky and wonderfully entertaining. [7 Oct 1998]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If anything, "Home Improvement" promises to be even more impressive in this, its sophomore year. ... Across the board, the show's stars have found greater comfort in their characters and are able to give them an easy, believable air and friendliness. [16 Sep 1992]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  3. It constantly offers more than you expect, and even when it delivers something either predictable or straight from the “women’s prison drama” handbook, it then counters with something fresh or unexpected.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It commands attention without being heavy-handed and serves up characters who seamlessly and effectively blend into the hour's compelling framework. [26 Sep 2002]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    "Weeds" is a blast, a wry, well-written look at the life of the pot dealer next door in small-screen suburbia. [1 Aug 2005]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  4. Its sharp, wily wit will be immediately appreciable. Here is a comedy construct that hits like "The Brothers Karamazov" and plays like the brothers Marx. [25 Sep 1992]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
    • 98 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a wonderful, subversive concept, and by failing to romanticize the players, "Office" remains true to its ghastly, funny self. [23 Jan 2003]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  5. Purists might balk, but for the rest of us, the latest retelling of the Superman tale is a brilliant blend of tradition and contemporary sensibility. Not only is it a Superman for a new generation, it's a Superman for every generation. [15 Oct 2001]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  6. It’s certainly an intriguing pilot--you can’t take your eyes off of Spader and the writers have thrown in a couple of other interesting twists.
  7. Bringing [Saul and Carrie] to the forefront and giving them a lot of scenes in the first two episodes has strengthened the series. The writing and acting in the first two episodes are exceptional. Let’s hope this continues, because it’s once again thrilling to watch this show.
  8. It’s a lusciously shot and brilliantly written and acted account of how the British aristocracy and progressives in high society fell in love with what can best be described as the tantalizing edginess of jazz music and the sense of exploration and wonder it brought to those who heard it even though society at the time was not ready to accept what it all implied.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A dramatic series that is steamy, provocative and filled with smart dialogue and richly drawn characters, none of whom are entirely predictable. [15 Jan 2004]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  9. While a miniseries might have truly been something to behold--allowing the slow helplessness to really penetrate viewers, there’s something to be said about making a big, loud noise and getting the message out--again. In that sense, both Murphy and Kramer do the play justice (as you would expect) and have created a powerful modern history reminder for those too young to understand the all-too-recent past.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Although the subject matter is familiar, the stories from exec producer Ron Hutchinson are fresh and packed with excitement and stylistic turns. [26 Jan 2004]
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  10. It’s a pleasure to watch, and the weaving of the narrative thread is a thing of beauty.
  11. All told, Transparent is a surprisingly poignant, funny and mature piece of work.
  12. Unhurried but amply rewarding, Olive Kitteridge is an all-around class act and a credit to everyone concerned.
  13. Credit the writers and the director--and the various wonderful acting performances you’ll see sprinkled about--for making The Missing something more than just a whodunit.
  14. Creator and writer Paul T. Scheuring offers this deal with viewers: Suspend credibility on a few key points and, in return, get a series that keeps you glued to the set for a full hour. My advice is to take the deal.
  15. "Supernatural" is unlike anything else out there and should build a following among viewers who appreciate its combination of spooky mythology and mystery adventure.
  16. "How I Met Your Mother" introduces a level of unpredictability not usually found in comedies.
    • The Hollywood Reporter
  17. It embodies many of the same elements that made Star's HBO half-hour a winner. That means an energetic blend of sex, sophistication, outlandishness and rat-a-tat-tat dialogue spilling from the mouths of effortlessly attractive characters in a sleek setting.
  18. What gives this serious heft and its own unique feel is the family drama woven throughout the premiere. That, and a group of particularly talented and skilled cast members who, under director Thomas Schlamme, take their performances to the highest levels.
  19. Gripping and thrilling.
  20. Outrageous at times, sentimental at other times, "The Boondocks" brings a unique and satiric vision to animation.
  21. This is a first-rate series that explores the hearts and minds of terrorists even as it presents scene after scene of suspense and action.
  22. As with all the "American Girl" stories and telefilms, "Felicity" makes history come alive in a compelling way for young viewers.
  23. "The Unit" is filled with thrilling action and heart-pounding adventure.
  24. This show goes in for neither cheap gags nor easy stereotypes, crafting a thought-provoking narrative that embodies genuine sociological heft without transforming its subjects into buffoons.
  25. It is smartly written, particularly well-cast and a worthy vehicle for Louis-Dreyfus and her high-energy comedy.
  26. Fun to watch, cleverly written and filled with engaging characters.
  27. The humorous moments are all the more precious because life is so tough in this engrossing series.
  28. The third season, as much as the two preceding ones, continues to breathe new life and vigor into the Western genre. What's more, the actors have become so comfortable in the skins of their characters, we can now appreciate the complexity of their personalities and desires.
  29. It makes mincemeat of conventional TV taboos and has, in Parker, a star whom the camera adores.
  30. Powerfully acted, artfully produced and shot like a truly riveting page-turner.
  31. In addition to some screwball comedy, it also has a lot of heart.
  32. A superbly constructed and unpredictable tale of intrigue and mystery.
  33. Director-writer Peter Berg understands completely, and he explores the psychology of team sport and the dynamics of personal tragedy with great sensitivity.
  34. Outrageous, bizarre, effortlessly hip and unsubtle in magically edgy ways.
  35. It's a one-of-a-kind thriller that rewards your attention with nonstop action, endless surprises, exciting cinematography and a great assortment of characters.
  36. Husband-and-wife team Josh Goldsmith and Cathy Yuspa pack the half-hour with oddball characters, zany circumstances and loads of physical comedy, but it's all grounded in enough reality to be utterly believable and irrepressibly funny.
  37. As exciting as the original.
  38. It bursts with humor thanks to a solid cast, smart writing and a quick pace.
  39. This remains a superb, positively riveting TV drama, however repetitive the themes and grandly implausible the scenarios.
  40. Brooding, seductive and smart.
  41. Lipkin demonstrates a keen eye for nuances of class and social structure and a unique perspective on how to attain the American dream.
  42. "Life" makes the ordinary extraordinary and along the way makes the world seem wider, bigger and an eternally more interesting place to be.
  43. The series, a feast for the eyes, boasts stellar performances and a historically authentic aura but only occasional flashes of the kind of action and suspense you might expect from such a period piece.
  44. Some of the sharpest political satire on the small screen.
  45. Unlike so many adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, this one not only pleases just as it stands but also could inspire a genuine curiosity in many viewers about seeing more of his work.
  46. This is challenging fare, but the smart storytelling and realistic portrayal of professional relationships is unique and worth checking out.
  47. A very un-Lifetime-like drama with sharp comedic overtones, one so well-constructed that dudes won't even feel the need to check their gender at the door.
  48. Bleak but intriguing, Company is a brilliant reflection of the mind-set that dominated world politics for a half century. Solid performances are the rule, with special applause for Molina and Keaton. Director Mikael Salomon effectively uses darkness and shadows to illustrate the clandestine environment as well as metaphors for this grim historical era.
  49. Californication can be unabashedly self-centered, judgmental and off-putting, but it is redeemed by occasional hilarious moments, an appealing father-daughter relationship and Duchovny's skillful creation of a charismatic boor.
  50. A new BBC America sci-fi/thriller that's so good and unsettling and creepy that even grumps like myself can't help but be in its thrall.
  51. It's imperative to make [a commitment] to this series because it doesn't really find itself until the second and third episodes. That's when you feel and recognize the beauty and the pain that Cynthia Mort smartly and sensitively portrays in her fiercely honest examination of sex in relationships.
  52. There's no such thing as a sure thing when it comes to new TV series, but Back to You is as close as it gets.
  53. This new NBC time-travel drama is fairly mind-blowing and harrowing, laying out a preposterous scenario that it makes feel nonetheless believable.
  54. Reaper is a fun show to watch but not to think about. The concept is imaginative, and the characters are enjoyable. The pilot is a hugely entertaining hour of TV.
  55. A nice combination of brains and belly laughs and a solid addition to the CBS comedy block on Monday nights.
  56. Under Michael Dinner's steady directorial hand, it's dark, tense and conspiratorial, a far cry from the camp sci-fi tricks of its predecessor.
  57. It's an entirely different vibe, further enhanced by a charismatic and quirky central character who is both unpredictable and impossible to pigeonhole. Given a chance to develop, Detective Charlie Crews could someday take a place with the likes of Kojak, Columbo and Monk.
  58. The Aliens pilot has some of the funniest writing on TV this fall.
  59. The series, from creators Bryan Fuller and Barry Sonnenfeld, is a masterful mixture of life, romance, optimism and youthful exuberance, all played out under the threat of instant death.
  60. In the second season, some novelty has inevitably worn off, but Dexter is, if anything, more of a paradox and remains one of the most compelling characters on TV.
  61. WMC--that's what the hip people will no doubt soon be calling it--sprints energetically from the gate carrying genuine qualitative heft: charismatic leads, snappy dialogue and an agreeable blend of lighthearted and dramatic.
  62. Director David Nutter gets the series off to a rousing start, practically packing every frame with suspense, special effects and an urgency that drives this show like an incessant drumbeat.
  63. Give Gilligan credit for a pilot, written mostly as one long flashback, that is suspenseful and surprising. Cranston is always fun to watch and Bad is no exception. What's more, a strong supporting cast suggests there is a lot of room for this series to grow.
  64. The performances of the players are so uniformly terrific that you could do worse than to bring these deeply flawed characters into your living room on a regular basis, as this is a series for which TiVo was invented if ever there was one.
  65. There's a strong supporting cast, including Loretta Devine as Stone's no-nonsense secretary, but the big attraction is Miller's Stone and his transformation from heartless corporate lawyer to protector of the little guy.
  66. Hip in tone but traditional in spirit, it's not at all hard to feel welcome at the Captain.
  67. The staging remains a bit creaky, but none of this diminishes the spirit of the play or the cast's commitment to the material, which almost seems palpable. It's still a provocative, powerful piece of work.
  68. Doesn't sound like the formula for compelling, consequential drama, but quarterlife manages to take these typically narcissistic young adults and make them legitimately interesting.
  69. A standout comedy with a lousy title.
  70. The series, from Liese's Herizon Prods. and New Line Television, is remarkable for the way it compresses time and hones in on pivotal moments.
  71. Black, a thinking-man's blowhard, carries the concept off with shameless aplomb, while his debating helpers are equal parts witty and wise.
  72. The acting here is first-rate, the details sharp and the cinematography superb. In other words, Tudors hasn't lost a step.
  73. Sure enough, HBO's "Recount" is replete with inside politics. But it also has well-written characters, first-class acting and confident directing, which produces a level of tension and suspense you wouldn’t expect in a story about a widely reported recent event.
  74. Each part has edge-of-the-seat moments, thanks to some admirable performances as well as several intriguing new plot twists that inject surprise at key moments.
  75. It takes nothing away from this genuinely talented group of kids to express even greater admiration for the promotion and marketing.
  76. As a follow-up to the groundbreaking summer series "Hopkins 24/7" that ran nearly eight years ago, this revisit to the medical center is, if anything, even more grounded in authenticity and honesty, even if it sometimes feels compelled to pile on the soapy elements.
  77. Shores has created a funny, loopy, off-kilter comedy that, truth be told, probably would play just as well on other cable channels, including Comedy Central and TV Land.
  78. Dinosaurs are certainly alive and well in Primeval, a crackling-good new BBC America sci-fi series thriller that's packed with vivid CGI prehistoric predators galore and a story line that's almost plausible.
  79. IFC's new 10-episode, late-night original comedy Z Rock is effortlessly, genuinely hilarious.
  80. Although episodes are self-contained, each has a clue that points to the overall involvement of a shadowy, giant corporation, Massive Dynamics. Combine these elements with solid special effects and confident direction and you get some heavy-duty counterprogramming to ABC's "Dancing With the Stars."
  81. This is one of the rare situation comedies that relies almost entirely on situations, each of which is more bizarre than the next and at the same time perfectly plausible. It's almost too good.
  82. This role is tailor-made for Baker, who has a flair for playing irreverent characters who are crucial to the success of the system even as they tweak its authority figures.
  83. It has the wit and bite that made the series a standout, but it has jettisoned much of the dramatic baggage that had begun to weigh the show down.
  84. There is a universality to "IT" that makes at least some of it instantly relatable. Ayoade, O'Dowd and Parkinson are terrific as employees who want only to keep their jobs but not let them interfere with their personal lives.
  85. Pace and Anna Friel, who plays Chuck, his childhood sweetheart, are as charming as ever. Even better, their relationship is evolving. Yet another encouraging sign is that the first few episodes promise significant involvement from one of TV's best supporting casts.
  86. The Ex List is one of those rare new season surprises that consistently charms straight out of the box, boasting a clever premise (borrowed from Israeli television) and a disarmingly appealing lead in Elizabeth Reaser (a recurring player on "Grey's Anatomy").
  87. Although no half-hour TV series is going to capture the visual splendor and sophisticated sound of the big-screen experience, it's surprising how well this series reflects the style, attitude, ideals and spirit of the six "Star Wars" films.
  88. Although the premiere could be more energetic, there's enough going on to coax you to revisit the Buffkins. Hephner shows genuine star potential with his portrayal of brooding Morgan, the moral center of the show. His performance is reason enough to keep watching, though others also stand out.
  89. The script, from Josh Applebaum, Andre Nemec and Scott Rosenberg, is true to the spirit of the original and exciting enough to make you swallow the premise and beg for more.
  90. We get the feeling Grier is much more concerned with scoring a laugh than raising an issue, which makes his well-placed jabs all the more clever.
  91. Two episodes NBC made available to critics prove this series is ready to scale even higher comedic heights and that the brightest spot on the planet is not the light atop the Luxor but the writers' room of 30 Rock.
  92. The action is swift, the patter is clever, the casting is smart and the special effects are nimble, all of which adds up to a flashy hour of fun.
  93. The perspective one gets from inside the House of Saddam is different than media reports from the outside and is, in itself, an important reason to tune in.
  94. The latest (and last) in the series featuring superhero librarian Flynn Carsen (Noah Wyle) packs more humor, suspense and adventure into two hours than either of its two predecessors.

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