The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,072 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Sopranos: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Mixology: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 578
  2. Negative: 0 out of 578
578 tv reviews
  1. The series, a feast for the eyes, boasts stellar performances and a historically authentic aura but only occasional flashes of the kind of action and suspense you might expect from such a period piece.
  2. Some of the sharpest political satire on the small screen.
  3. Unlike so many adaptations of Shakespeare's plays, this one not only pleases just as it stands but also could inspire a genuine curiosity in many viewers about seeing more of his work.
  4. This is challenging fare, but the smart storytelling and realistic portrayal of professional relationships is unique and worth checking out.
  5. A very un-Lifetime-like drama with sharp comedic overtones, one so well-constructed that dudes won't even feel the need to check their gender at the door.
  6. Bleak but intriguing, Company is a brilliant reflection of the mind-set that dominated world politics for a half century. Solid performances are the rule, with special applause for Molina and Keaton. Director Mikael Salomon effectively uses darkness and shadows to illustrate the clandestine environment as well as metaphors for this grim historical era.
  7. Californication can be unabashedly self-centered, judgmental and off-putting, but it is redeemed by occasional hilarious moments, an appealing father-daughter relationship and Duchovny's skillful creation of a charismatic boor.
  8. A new BBC America sci-fi/thriller that's so good and unsettling and creepy that even grumps like myself can't help but be in its thrall.
  9. It's imperative to make [a commitment] to this series because it doesn't really find itself until the second and third episodes. That's when you feel and recognize the beauty and the pain that Cynthia Mort smartly and sensitively portrays in her fiercely honest examination of sex in relationships.
  10. There's no such thing as a sure thing when it comes to new TV series, but Back to You is as close as it gets.
  11. This new NBC time-travel drama is fairly mind-blowing and harrowing, laying out a preposterous scenario that it makes feel nonetheless believable.
  12. Reaper is a fun show to watch but not to think about. The concept is imaginative, and the characters are enjoyable. The pilot is a hugely entertaining hour of TV.
  13. A nice combination of brains and belly laughs and a solid addition to the CBS comedy block on Monday nights.
  14. Under Michael Dinner's steady directorial hand, it's dark, tense and conspiratorial, a far cry from the camp sci-fi tricks of its predecessor.
  15. It's an entirely different vibe, further enhanced by a charismatic and quirky central character who is both unpredictable and impossible to pigeonhole. Given a chance to develop, Detective Charlie Crews could someday take a place with the likes of Kojak, Columbo and Monk.
  16. The Aliens pilot has some of the funniest writing on TV this fall.
  17. The series, from creators Bryan Fuller and Barry Sonnenfeld, is a masterful mixture of life, romance, optimism and youthful exuberance, all played out under the threat of instant death.
  18. In the second season, some novelty has inevitably worn off, but Dexter is, if anything, more of a paradox and remains one of the most compelling characters on TV.
  19. WMC--that's what the hip people will no doubt soon be calling it--sprints energetically from the gate carrying genuine qualitative heft: charismatic leads, snappy dialogue and an agreeable blend of lighthearted and dramatic.
  20. Director David Nutter gets the series off to a rousing start, practically packing every frame with suspense, special effects and an urgency that drives this show like an incessant drumbeat.
  21. Give Gilligan credit for a pilot, written mostly as one long flashback, that is suspenseful and surprising. Cranston is always fun to watch and Bad is no exception. What's more, a strong supporting cast suggests there is a lot of room for this series to grow.
  22. The performances of the players are so uniformly terrific that you could do worse than to bring these deeply flawed characters into your living room on a regular basis, as this is a series for which TiVo was invented if ever there was one.
  23. There's a strong supporting cast, including Loretta Devine as Stone's no-nonsense secretary, but the big attraction is Miller's Stone and his transformation from heartless corporate lawyer to protector of the little guy.
  24. Hip in tone but traditional in spirit, it's not at all hard to feel welcome at the Captain.
  25. The staging remains a bit creaky, but none of this diminishes the spirit of the play or the cast's commitment to the material, which almost seems palpable. It's still a provocative, powerful piece of work.
  26. Doesn't sound like the formula for compelling, consequential drama, but quarterlife manages to take these typically narcissistic young adults and make them legitimately interesting.
  27. A standout comedy with a lousy title.
  28. The series, from Liese's Herizon Prods. and New Line Television, is remarkable for the way it compresses time and hones in on pivotal moments.
  29. Black, a thinking-man's blowhard, carries the concept off with shameless aplomb, while his debating helpers are equal parts witty and wise.
  30. The acting here is first-rate, the details sharp and the cinematography superb. In other words, Tudors hasn't lost a step.

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