The Hollywood Reporter's Scores

For 1,101 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Homeland: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Charlie's Angels: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 595
  2. Negative: 0 out of 595
595 tv reviews
  1. Directed with aplomb by Mat Whitecross, who periodically decides, in the course of this four-hour feast, to stop making a movie about a man and instead make a Bond movie, Fleming is the kind of movie that winks at you constantly and you never get annoyed by the intimations.
  2. Mostly Moone Boy is a coming-of-age story for a kid probably not yet equipped to battle the real world. But there’s so much humor and sweet-but-not-sacharrine moments (and absurdity), that it’s the kind of coming-of-age story you can’t wait to see Martin (and O’Dowd) experience together.
  3. Life's clean, clear storytelling is worth a go-around.
  4. Fun to watch, cleverly written and filled with engaging characters.
  5. After going from the humble creation of Superman to the filmic juggernauts like Avengers, those with a growing interest in the world of comics should leave satisfied with their new knowledge, while veteran fans will likely be drawn in by a strong sense of nostalgia, particularly given the ample amount of archival footage.
  6. There's a strong supporting cast, including Loretta Devine as Stone's no-nonsense secretary, but the big attraction is Miller's Stone and his transformation from heartless corporate lawyer to protector of the little guy.
  7. As it stands after two entertaining episodes, there's a lot that Agent Carter can do going forward. It already feels like a series, and if it can keep that up--plus highlight the hell out of Hayley Atwell--then a second season should come easy.
  8. It has chills and humor and the ability to take a procedural story and twist it.
  9. Boston’s Finest is a sleek and engaging work that is a world away from Southie Rules or even Cops, but it fits in perfectly with TNT's love of Law & Order.
  10. For now, "Persons" is delightfully weird and foreboding.
  11. For those new to the legend, this is a fresh, and delightfully color-blind, approach to the tale.
  12. Thanks to its camera-ready cast of extraordinarily real women, Mob Wives' version is no less affecting. As for those other real housewives franchises, their endless squabbles and social climbing antics are rendered rather trivial after you watch the first five minutes of Mob Wives. The real action, it turns out, is on Staten Island.
  13. It makes mincemeat of conventional TV taboos and has, in Parker, a star whom the camera adores.
  14. This is challenging fare, but the smart storytelling and realistic portrayal of professional relationships is unique and worth checking out.
  15. The first pair of episodes augur a breezily entertaining addition to the TNT stable of dramatic originals.
  16. When everyone behind the camera is an admirer, including Ocean's director Steven Soderbergh, the doc's exec producer, then you won't get much introspection. But, boy, do you get stories told with the vivid sense of drama and imagery that old Homer would no doubt admire.
  17. It's not a perfect pilot; most sitcoms aren't. But, like a precious few others, you can see that everyone involved is funny and connected to the concept.
  18. Christopher Wilcha’s documentary effectively combines well-chosen performance footage from the three-hour show with enough fly-on-the-wall rehearsal peeks to provide an intriguing insider’s view.
  19. This remains a superb, positively riveting TV drama, however repetitive the themes and grandly implausible the scenarios.
  20. Under Michael Dinner's steady directorial hand, it's dark, tense and conspiratorial, a far cry from the camp sci-fi tricks of its predecessor.
  21. It's imperative to make [a commitment] to this series because it doesn't really find itself until the second and third episodes. That's when you feel and recognize the beauty and the pain that Cynthia Mort smartly and sensitively portrays in her fiercely honest examination of sex in relationships.
  22. This role is tailor-made for Baker, who has a flair for playing irreverent characters who are crucial to the success of the system even as they tweak its authority figures.
  23. While all the philosophical, existential and surprisingly intimate moments of their friendship are the wonderfully surprising backbone to Wilfred, the hook is the absurdist situations and brilliant humor.
  24. House of Lies is giving him (and the rest of the actors) something fresh and different to devour, which makes it a show you need to consult with.
  25. This isn’t look-at-me journalism with a fitted Gap t-shirt. It’s more of a holy-hell-can-you-believe-this approach that fights perfectly on a cable channel trying to do something different.
  26. WMC--that's what the hip people will no doubt soon be calling it--sprints energetically from the gate carrying genuine qualitative heft: charismatic leads, snappy dialogue and an agreeable blend of lighthearted and dramatic.
  27. A very un-Lifetime-like drama with sharp comedic overtones, one so well-constructed that dudes won't even feel the need to check their gender at the door.
  28. It takes nothing away from this genuinely talented group of kids to express even greater admiration for the promotion and marketing.
  29. The script, from Josh Applebaum, Andre Nemec and Scott Rosenberg, is true to the spirit of the original and exciting enough to make you swallow the premise and beg for more.
  30. Deep inside Philanthropist is a smart, earnest yet realistic series waiting to be told, and the pilot makes an intriguing beginning.

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