The Independent (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 864 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 50 Words for Snow
Lowest review score: 20 Violet Cries
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 17 out of 864
864 music reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She's surely destined to become one of the voices of the year, while her accomplices' subtle confections of minimal electro throbs and stripped-back beats has an alluring simplicity that's like a refreshing, palate-cleansing sorbet.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s both mesmerically appealing and cacophonously repellent, a paradoxical blend repeated in the shrill, thrumming monotony of “Austerity Blues”.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beautiful, blissful melodies are buried in there.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What's not in doubt is how faithfully he's stuck to the core deep-soul verities, with a delivery that vaults from spoken sermonising to raw, impassioned hurt in an instant.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On their tribute to The Everly Brothers, Bonnie “Prince” Billy and Faun Fables' Dawn McCarthy avoid the obvious hits in favour of more unfamiliar items from the brothers' repertoire.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Opening with urgent triplets, it settles into an elegant braiding of interlaced lines that push the music forward in waves.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The fingering and virtuoso touches, the deft harmonics, the subtle string-bends are all delivered with minimal fuss throughout, whether it's a solo piece like the wistful "Dery Miss Grsk", the Bach transposition "Cello Prelude In G", which works so well with his instrument or the jaunty ragtime of "Ugly James".
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Rufus Wainwright believes this to be "the most pop album" he's ever made, and he's probably right, so long as you're thinking 1970s pop.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By reflecting on the personal issues that first inspired him, Murdoch has reminded his band what they’re made of and sparked a loving surprise: their most expansive, exquisite mission statement since 1998.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Staves are like a distillation of all that's best about the folk heritages of England and America.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The tone here is more robust than [Pull Up Some Dust and Sit Down's] thoughtful reflections on history and poverty, taking its cue rather from the ribald pillorying of conservatives in tracks like "No Banker Left Behind" and "I Want My Crown".
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Not to everyone’s taste, but at its best Gamel fizzes with sonic imagination.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a danger of art-rock overload in this alliance of two cerebral music talents, but Love This Giant succeeds remarkably well.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's more of a return to her roots in the feisty Eighties punk-jazz outfit Rip, Rig + Panic.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While not as immediately career-defining as Wake Up the Nation, there's no denying that with Sonik Kicks, Paul Weller is continuing the courageous, exploratory course established on 2008's 22 Dreams.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's an awful lot of music crammed into Plumb's 35 minutes, but it's rarely organized into the most attractive shapes - and on the few occasions it is, they alter course within seconds and head off in some less appealing direction.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mogwai's score for the French TV series Les Revenants places certain restrictions on the band's style which, it must be said, work to their advantage.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [A] strange and compelling work.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With M Ward on guitar, Giant Sand's Thøger Tetens Lund on string bass, and Sonic Youth's Steve Shelley on brushed drums, the atmosphere is akin to a shabby cabaret, to which KT Tunstall and a sweet-voiced Bonnie "Prince" Billy add a touch of elegance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Penguin Cafe’s music continuing to explore the more earthly pleasures to be found at the confluence of world, folk, minimalism and chamber music.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A nice place to visit, but you wouldn't want to live here.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    New
    There's an uneven texture to the project. It's okay, but only just.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is just another competent rock record in hock to the band Wire used to be.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Kiss Each Other Clean is much more focused and homogenous, but there's still a lingering sense of abundant inspiration, eager to carry the songs off to different lairs.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The backdrops feature dark sheets of strings and organ, the occasional lonely trumpet, and lumpy, superstitious drums driving the menacing Western mythos to its doom: not a forgiving place, but an engrossing one.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Richard Hawley has upped his game considerably on his first album for Parlophone, leaving behind his urbane, rockabilly-tinged retro-nuevo style for a full-blooded immersion in ringing psychedelic rock. It's totally unexpected, and completely winning.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bohemian legend and walking R&B encyclopaedia Chuck Weiss is on great form on this latest album.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's ironic that soul music dominates, given Collins' lack of its most crucial element: a commanding vocal presence.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They now dart in yet another direction, devising a shuffling indie-dance style that recalls variously the infectious syncopations of Talking Heads, the baggy grooves of Happy Mondays and the campfire psychedelia of Animal Collective, but somehow manages to sound homogenously all of a piece.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On the excellent Wheelhouse, Brad Paisley tiptoes a fine line between satisfying his core country audience and encouraging them to more adventurous attitudes.