The New York Times' Scores

For 1,847 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Kids in the Hall: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Notes from the Underbelly: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 880
  2. Negative: 0 out of 880
880 tv reviews
  1. The Carmichael Show consistently feels surprising, not formulaic, partly because of the talent assembled, partly because of Mr. Carmichael’s comic philosophy of prodding his audience.
  2. It takes a lot to make an I.R.S. agent the good guy in a series -- a lot of nerve, imagination and clever writing, a combination that sets the inspired Push, Nevada apart from every other new show of the season.
  3. It’s a dizzying reprise, and also a dazzling one.
  4. They practice the comedy of female semi-empowerment, in which confidence (tending toward narcissism) and a still somewhat startling sexual frankness combine with old-fashioned insecurity and self-abasement, all of them generating laughs.
  5. The script, by Amanda Coe, has a dexterous sense of fun.
  6. The smooth telling of Russo's story juxtaposed against the present day, when gay marriage is sanctioned in some states and gay characters are all over prime-time television, drives home how different the cultural landscape is from the one Russo knew.
  7. This is a deceptively difficult form to nail; often those who try end up with little more than a collection of flatulence jokes. Done right, though, as it is in "Galavant," a mindless comedy is not the same as a dumb comedy. It’s smart, just in a carefree way.
  8. By using a celebrity as a Trojan horse, Teach offers an engaging and intimate look at just how complicated and difficult teaching can be at a large, urban public high school.
  9. Questions of innocence are established fairly early in the far more appealing of the legal dramas beginning on Wednesday: The Defenders on CBS. Here the love connection is unambiguously platonic and winning.
  10. Underground, another well-made show from the underappreciated network WGN America, is at its best when it’s hardest to watch.
  11. Trust Me, a TNT series set in a Chicago advertising agency, is clever and likeable.
  12. Ms. Palin dominates as a disarming egotist whose presumption is balanced by charisma and animal cunning--and in this film, as in life, she has the last smirk.
  13. A very likable and melancholy drama about high school basketball and patrimony.
  14. On "State of Play" and Prime Suspect, ordinary men and women take center stage and hold it beautifully. [16 Apr 2004, p.E1]
    • The New York Times
  15. In the fog of war movies, some events are hard to follow, a few characters are easily confused, but the series is never less than spellbinding.
  16. State of Mind owes most of its appeal to Ms. Taylor, an accomplished indie actress with unusual jolie-laide looks who brings a wry charm and dignity to the inauspicious role of a wronged wife who is also burdened with an overbearing mother.
  17. The most endearing comedy about love to come to television since the Manolos were packed up and put away.
  18. A clever, affecting and sly new show about bad choices begetting worse ones, begins somewhere near the intersection of romance and horror.
  19. Survivor’s Remorse is mordant and very funny, but there is a redeeming sweetness beneath the satire and b-ball swagger.
  20. An unpredictably enjoyable ride.
  21. The show’s premise could easily have made this a silly enterprise, but with Mr. Skarsgard’s tight performance anchoring things, it instead is a first-rate psychological study.
  22. The story so far is compelling, but, as with that true-crime podcast, our judgments will be heavily influenced by how the series plays out and what kind of resolution it provides (or doesn’t).
  23. Tony Shalhoub is not the only reason to watch Monk, a smart new detective series on USA, but the intriguing character he and the show's writers have created might have been enough.
  24. It doesn’t have the emotional or stylistic highs of those predecessors [“The Sopranos” and “The Godfather”], but it carries you along like one of the sleek Italian motorcycles preferred by its wealthier characters.
  25. This is a thoughtful series that lingers over death rather than using it for shock value; one that finds its story lines in small power struggles rather than gruesome palace coups.
  26. It’s a smart, imaginatively made and unusually sweeping look at what happened to the world from Sarajevo in 1914 to Hiroshima in 1945, or as Churchill put it, “one story of a 30 years’ war.”
  27. Top Chef promises more than a clash of personalities; it inspires patriotism.
  28. When was the last time a series started off with nine complicated, well-developed characters, not including the colorful faculty? [29 Sept 1999, p.E8]
    • The New York Times
  29. Grimm is not a profound show (what is?), but few are more purely entertaining--engaging, clever, tense, funny, well paced and featuring a remarkably appealing cast as the friends and colleagues who help Nick.
  30. In general, the program successfully walks a fine line between glorifying technology and treating it as a curiosity. No one knows where all this is headed, but Dark Net is at least peering into the possible futures with more sophistication than most.

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