The New Yorker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,370 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Bloody Sunday
Lowest review score: 0 Bio-Dome
Score distribution:
1,370 movie reviews
  1. This square movie, at its best, is very powerful.
  2. The beautiful joke of Factotum is that Dillon is nobility itself.
  3. One of the year’s more luscious releases, offering not just the sleekest car chase but the most romantic of rainstorms.
  4. Not one of Scorsese's greatest films; it doesn't use the camera to reveal the psychological and aesthetic dimensions of an entire world, as "Mean Streets," "Taxi Driver," "Raging Bull," and "Goodfellas" did. But it's a viciously merry, violent, high-wattage entertainment, and speech is the most brazenly flamboyant element in it.
  5. Though Lee still can't resist a fancy visual trick from time to time, Clockers is, at its best—in its compound of the jaunty and the depressing—his ripest work to date.
  6. Flags of Our Fathers is an accomplished, stirring, but, all in all, rather strange movie
  7. It is equipped, like an F-15 Eagle, to engage multiple targets at once.
  8. Revved by the stage performances, the cast courses through the material with disciplined exuberance--especially the eight young actors at the center of the drama, many of whom have never appeared in a film before.
  9. That is the thing about Gibson, fool that he is in other ways: he has learned how to tell a tale, and to raise a pulse in the telling. You have to admire that basic gift, uncommon as it is in Hollywood these days.
  10. It's a film that you need to see, not a film that you especially want to.
  11. A wonderfully entertaining movie.
  12. Zodiac is superbly made, but it's also a strange piece of work.
  13. Burnett used many kinds of African-American music on the soundtrack, and the movie itself has the bedraggled eloquence of an old blues record. The amateur actors, who occasionally burst into fury, combined with the black-and-white cinematography, bring the poverty of Watts closer to us emotionally.
  14. The whole enterprise goes far beyond pastiche, wreathing its characters in a film-intoxicated world.
  15. On the surface, Apatow's films are about sex--obsessively, exclusively, and exhaustively. (This one lasts more than two hours.) But that is a clever feint, for their true subject is age.
  16. You come out of the movie both excited and soothed, as if your body had been worked on by felt-covered drumsticks.
  17. The movie is exhilarating in a way that only hard-won knowledge of the world can be.
  18. In this movie, Fonda really is iconic. 3:10 to Yuma may be familiar, but, at its best, it has a rapt quality, even an aura of wonder.
  19. Bean, a lovely guy with a touch of Mickey Rooney, is one of the stars of Sington’s rousing show. There was something unearthly, in every sense, about the astronauts in their prime.
  20. No one could mistake the movie for a documentary, but the picture has some of the rectitude of a good documentary--a tone of plainness without flatness.
  21. In truth, I’ve never seen so much lovemaking in an aboveground film, but the revelation, and great triumph, of Lou’s work is that these scenes are never pornographic--that is, never separated from emotion.
  22. It’s all fascinating. Gilroy is an entertainer.
  23. Those who worship Joy Division may bridle at Corbijn’s film for its reluctance to mythologize their hero. Speaking as someone so irretrievably square that I not only never listened to the band but didn’t even know anyone who liked it, I can’t imagine a tribute more fitting than this.
  24. Furious and entertaining little morality play.
  25. The pace of the movie is rapid, almost hectic, the touch glancing. Until the confrontation between Frank and Richie at the end, nothing stays on the screen for long, although Scott, working in the street, or in clubs and at parties, packs as much as he can into the corners of shots, and shapes even the most casual scenes decisively.
  26. Langella is superb, and Starting Out in the Evening is a classy film.
  27. Vital, honest, and engaging.
  28. The Spanish director Isabel Coixet works with candor, directness, and simplicity. She isn't afraid of lengthy scenes of the two actors just talking to each other, mixed with lavish but respectful attention to Cruz's body, especially her bare chest, which is treated as one of the wonders of all creation.
  29. You exit the cinema in a fever of melancholia, wondering how long it will take you to shed the sensation of alarm. The film is less of a shocker than an adventure in anxiety, testing and twisting some of the classic studies in infantile curiosity.
  30. Along with “No End in Sight,” this movie is one of the essential documentaries of the ongoing war.

Top Trailers