The Telegraph (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 454 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Natalie Merchant
Lowest review score: 20 Killer Sounds
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 454
454 music reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Kiss Each Other Clean recalls Scritti Politti, or Sufjan Stevens--perhaps not what his folky fans were hoping for, but it's an impressive makeover.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Although some of his anecdotes could drag on repeated listening, he is an engaging raconteur.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Although something of a melting pot, this is an original and accessible album, blending world influences with old time American music.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The son of Richard Thompson is capable of writing his own striking lyrics but sometimes they are straining a little too hard.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Their second album combines ballistic rave pop with tougher bass-laden sounds and is an effectively youthful update on the Prodigy's formula.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Given that it's for dancing, Butler's production tends toward the cool--even plodding--but his polishing up of 20-year-old stylistic tics still entertains.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It could have been mawkish but it's a simple, affecting and lovely tribute.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    All in all, another real treat from the 63-year-old queen of English folk.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The good news is that, from its amusingly headlong title down, Different Gear, Still Speeding feels a good deal less lumpy than the last few Oasis albums.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The result is never maudlin, but big, bouncy and entertaining.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Not as cohesive as their very best work, R.E.M.'s 15th album is still as smart, sonically rich and emotionally resonant as a guitar band can ever hope to be.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Buddy Miller organised a Grade A country guitarist convention, threw in some wonderful guest vocalists and then recorded, as if live, an impressive album.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's all an interesting time capsule and what makes it worthwhile for Cash fans is that there are 26 previously unreleased tracks. Disc 2 sounds a tad more produced but a song about dismissing a former lover--Wide Open Road--and the jaunty Five Minutes To Live are treats.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is an album you admire rather than love.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are still a little too many US FM radio pop-metal vocals, but happily there's also plenty of fierce, melody-laced drum & bass action that will please festivals and dancefloors the world over.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    She attacks old soul numbers with gusto, turning them into cheery Stones-ish romps, but is at her best on pared-back material heavy with world-weary pathos.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    To have four songs over 10 minutes on your debut is brave; when the record recalls Neil Young's sadder moments and explores the anguish of a break-up, it is foolhardy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album is the second in the four-volume Nomad series and the Cowboy Junkies said they felt they owed Chesnutt something. They have paid their debt in handsome fashion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    I worry about where they can go next with such a restrictive musical template, but here they have managed subtle refinement without sacrificing the essence of their primitive appeal.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Together they make efficient, likeable, club-friendly pop, with the house numbers less memorable than her drum and bass leanings.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Her soprano singing is a little derivative of Krauss's but is still sweet and clear and is surely a work in progress given her youthfulness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's an album marinated in sadness, so much so that in places it veers into the maudlin, but Harris's poetic steel usually saves the day.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Fairport Convention are like the Stanley Matthews of folk music--age does nothing to erode essential quality.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Full of groove and grit, it's raw and enjoyable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The production doesn't always give Nicks's gothic imagery enough waft, but fans will love puzzling over which of her paramours she's recalling on Secret Love.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sparsely arranged around piano, guitar and his gruff vocals, it's sombre, but affecting.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A flat-out belter of the Adele/Florence school, surrounded variously by daft orchestral sturm-und-drang and flimsy ProTools disco/house. Better may come.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Blending hi-tech and lo-fi, modern synthesised sound and old-fashioned song writing, her work plumbs torrid emotional depths, similar to alt-rock stars such as Lou Barlow.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Pitched somewhere between his two most famous albums, Play and 18, it's hardly groundbreaking but is enjoyable none the less.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's something of a connoisseur's collection (steering clear of some of the big hits such as Release Me) but has treasures such as Making Believe.