The Telegraph's Scores

  • Movies
For 558 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Play
Lowest review score: 0 May I Kill U?
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 39 out of 558
558 movie reviews
  1. The world of Mad Max has always been welded together from bits of whatever was lying around, and the films’ brilliance has always been in their welding – the ingenious ways in which their scrap-metal parts were combined to create something unthinkable, hilarious or obscene, and often all three.
  2. Interstellar is Nolan’s best and most brazenly ambitious film to date.
  3. Despite its well-worn ideas and themes, Gary Ross’s provocative, pulse-surgingly tense adaptation couldn’t feel fresher, or timelier.
  4. It’s extremely moving in the gentlest, most linear way, and the other performances are sterling, too.
  5. This is a masterpiece of serious cinema; long, slow and grave as the grave.
  6. If films were gestures, this one would be a perfectly timed shrug, with the smile to match.
  7. Kore-eda has crafted a piercing, tender poem about the bittersweet ebb and flow of paternal love, and his status as Ozu's heir becomes ever more assured.
  8. It’s an astonishing achievement. Linklater and his cast, who helped refine the director’s script, perfectly execute how long it takes us to become the lead characters in our own lives, and how fumblingly the role is first assumed.
  9. Strickland has made something uniquely sexy and strange, built on two tremendous central performances and a bone-deep understanding of cinema’s magic and mechanisms.
  10. A science-fiction thriller of rare and diamond-hard brilliance.
  11. It’s beautifully organised, and there’s no way you could possibly watch it without learning all kinds of stuff.
  12. Kaufman and Johnson tease out the possible causes and effects of Michael’s crisis with great imagination, tilting your sympathies so subtly as they do so that you don’t even feel it going on.
  13. Justin Kurzel’s blistering, blood-sticky new screen version of Macbeth unseams the famous Shakespearean tragedy open from the nave to the chops, letting its insides spill out across the rock underfoot.
  14. You just have to watch it, then grab a net and try to coax your soul back down from the ceiling.
  15. At first, watching Pacific Rim feels like rediscovering a favourite childhood cartoon – but del Toro has flooded the project with such affection and artistry that, rather than smiling nostalgically, you find yourself enchanted all over again.
  16. The film is stupendous: as antic as Boogie Nights and Punch-Drunk Love, but with The Master and There Will Be Blood’s uncanny feel for the swell and ebb of history.
  17. It radiates a candour, immediacy and tongue-scalding sex appeal that a bigger budget would have only smothered.
  18. The demented brilliance of Miike’s film lies in the director’s ability to craft ideas that are simultaneously sublime and ridiculous.
  19. It’s wonderful.
  20. Hyper-violent it may be but there is beauty in its brutality.
  21. Silk curtains flutter and fall, candles glow, fires crackle softly in the grate. Every scene, every shot, has been composed with total, Kubrickian precision, and calibrated for maximum, breath-quickening impact.
  22. Like Someone in Love, is another miracle at close quarters. Its subject is the impossibility of intimacy in the modern world: chewy stuff, to be sure, but Kiarostami explores it with a depth and delicacy that recalls the Japanese master Yasujiro Ozu.
  23. Every shot of Stray Dogs has been built with utter formal mastery; every sequence exerts an almost telepathic grip.
  24. Where we might have expected a gentle or rueful coda, we get a battle of the sexes as blistering as the best of Tracy/Hepburn, and infinitely more frank.
  25. Despite borrowing cleverly from the best, It Follows still manages to feel like no other example in recent years - tender, remarkably ingenious and scalp-pricklingly scary.
  26. Carol is gorgeous, gently groundbreaking, and might be the saddest thing you’ll ever see. More than hugely accomplished cinema, it’s an exquisite work of American art, rippling with a very specific mid-century melancholy, understanding love as the riskiest but most necessary gamble in anyone’s experience.
  27. As hot and wet as freshly butchered meat: every second, every frame of its three-hour running time is virile with a lifetime’s accumulated genius.
  28. A shimmering coup de cinema to make your heart burst, your mind swim and your soul roar.
  29. Elicits from McQueen a directing job that's compellingly humble but also majestic, because his radical showmanship is turned to such precise, human purposes.
  30. This is instant A-list Coens; enigmatic, exhilarating, irresistible.

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