Time Out London's Scores

  • Movies
For 375 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Dark Days
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 15 out of 375
375 movie reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At one point a character even ponders aloud that it’s probably best not to think too hard about how this ecology might work or whether it makes sense. Amen to that.
  1. It falters once the actual war begins: Ben Kingsley shows up as a Maori warrior with the weirdest imaginable accent, the final battle is uninvolving, and there’s an unconvincing upbeat coda. Ender’s Game ends up being fitfully engaging and endearingly odd.
  2. This is a deeply silly, extremely noisy and sometimes impenetrable action movie that’s drowning in CGI, wild overacting and mullets. And it’s enormously entertaining.
  3. For all its humanistic warmth and undoubted charm, Short Term 12 just never quite rings true.
  4. Child’s Pose plays its thematic cards far too early, but it’s sustained by Gheorghiu’s compelling central turn as the endlessly self-deluding grande dame.
  5. It’s a touching film and a fascinating glimpse into one of those couples you can’t quite believe are still together.
  6. It has a rigorous, even unrelenting, grey, green and brown palette and, narratively, it’s tough to penetrate.
  7. The film does approach Milius with a certain reverence, but it can’t disguise the fact that he’s a troubling, divisive figure: bull-headed, almost cartoonishly macho, staunchly right-wing and dangerously self-obsessed.
  8. There’s a pleasing no-frills tone to the whole enterprise as well as a convincing grasp of the rituals and beliefs of the age.
  9. Seidl gestures towards understanding rather than confrontation – turning in a slighter, softer-grained film than its predecessors, but no worse for it.
  10. The result isn’t as powerful as it should be. But it’s still cheering to see a film whose moral journey has little to do with the usual Hollywood chestnut of white middle-class consciousness-raising.
  11. The unusually extended shooting period and Winterbottom’s decision to cast siblings as the kids make for a strangely intimate and powerful depiction of time passing and the peaks and troughs of childhood.
  12. Moretz is unnervingly talented, but Carrie is not a role she was born to play. She hasn’t a victim’s bone in her body and fluffs the early scenes when the mean girls pick on her.
  13. There are no interviews, characters nor narration, and after an hour it can feel like a chore. Yet the images are staggering.
  14. Softley negotiates layers of deceit with skill, but an uncharacteristic visual and narrative tightness leaves one wondering what might have been.
  15. Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues is not the disaster some feared it might be, but neither is it the endlessly quotable, deliciously idiotic follow-on so many of us were optimistically anticipating.
  16. Cloying at times – but always good-natured.
  17. In Firth’s every grimace and flinch you feel the torment of Lomax’s private world, but emotionally ‘The Railway Man’ feels trimmed and tidied up.
  18. If you’ve never been to a burlesque show, now you know what you’re missing. The dedication and warmth of the performers are infectious.
  19. If you enjoy improbable plot twists, overcooked dialogue and Hollywood legends champing on scenery, this adaptation is a highly entertaining slice of American Gothic.
  20. It’s all rather charming, though, since leading man Schilling remains affable while never underselling this kindly yet feckless dropout’s sheer spinelessness.
  21. A little too rough around the edges to fully engage.
  22. Bale is as good as it gets, Harrelson shows us why he is Hollywood’s favourite psycho and Willem Dafoe is terrific as a sleazy drug dealer. The rest of the film is without a bat squeak of authenticity.
  23. Neither an anti-war tract nor a jingoistic rallying cry, the brutal but humane Lone Survivor instead registers as a howl of despair for so many young men and women lost in war.
  24. [An] amiable but flat-footed debut feature.
  25. Not exactly arthouse, but as subtitled fluff goes, we’re talking première classe.
  26. This is a slicker, shinier, admittedly inferior affair. But with a strong cast, a roaring pace and at least one genuinely unforgettable scene, it’s by no means a write-off.
  27. There are some gorgeous Disney touches, rabble-rousing songs on the pirate ship and the usual ‘best friends for ever’ message.
  28. Only Lovers Left Alive drags its feet and shows serious signs of anaemia as a story.
  29. In this heartfelt film, Fleifel shows us the human cost of the conflict.

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