Time Out New York's Scores

  • Movies
For 2,807 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 My Perestroika
Lowest review score: 0 Vampires Suck
Score distribution:
2807 movie reviews
  1. Working with uneven material, the illustrious cast is too often stranded in a realm of tony, high-art camp.
  2. Once this cultural exploration devolves into just a forum for grating geek griping and Jar-Jar Binks hatred, however, you'll wish you could escape to a galaxy far, far away.
  3. After the novelty of these backgrounds and comin'-at-ya bits wears off, Mars Needs Moms has to rely on Fogler's obnoxious Jack Black Jr. shtick, a weak subplot involving a '60s-obsessed Martian graffiti artist (Harnois) and rote video-game-y action sequences to carry it along-and that simply won't cut it.
  4. Despite toggling among the three characters' story lines, the film is barely concerned with the who, what or where of the incidents, much less a deeper why. It simply wants to milk this real-life example of courage (and chaos) under fire for multiplex thrills, reducing everything to a cheap adrenaline rush set to a pulsing soundtrack.
  5. 2 Guns quickly degenerates into boilerplate Hollywood sound and fury, complete with a climactic Mexican standoff that revolves around a massive, burning pile of money. Irony, thou art lost.
  6. The frustratingly artless He Named Me Malala is but the latest of Guggenheim’s paeans to the global need for education
  7. Just because you tart up a typical romantic comedy with trash talk doesn't make it edgy or real.
  8. There’s something admirable about the anything-goes energy that Van Peebles brings to this tall tale, but the amateurishness and Video Toaster–era technical tricks start to grate after a bit. It’s a funky, free-form fairy tale, but one that only a mutha could truly love.
  9. Filmmaker Gérald Hustache-Mathieu has fun recasting Monroevian moments and setting up parallels between the fromage-hawking hottie and the late silver-screen sex symbol - bring on the Miller, DiMaggio and JFK avatars.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Morgan and preteen dybbuk host Calis draw some pathos out of their father-daughter discord, but you can't have a possession without a soul.
  10. The doc’s most intriguing moment has Summers dropping into a Japanese karaoke bar and singing along to an in-progress Police hit, an affable man wandering through his own legacy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It's about as deep as an afternoon of people-watching.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The movie spends almost as much time allowing the filmmaker, playing a progressive-minded teacher, to push his students to be better citizens by interviewing homeless people on skid row (!) as it does watching the younger generation trying to get some. It's an uneasy mixture of crude yukking and mixed-message uplift that satisfies on neither level.
  11. Plays like a tiresomely extended evening of channel surfing.
  12. The D Train ultimately generates so few laughs from its thin “be yourself” message that a commendable refusal to gawk at the gay stuff is all that keeps it on track.
  13. Thor accomplishes its essential goal and little else, which is to introduce the mighty warrior to the Marvel screen universe.
  14. It’s too busy pleasing itself with lame references to (among others) Eddie Vedder and Hillary Clinton that suggest the film believes old stuff is funny because, you know, it’s old.
  15. The girls are worth rooting for, but their pursuit is secondary to one sorry-ass dude's redemption. That's a win?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In allowing Dreier to shape his own narrative, too many lame excuses are allowed to pass, as the financial schemer spins his own story dangerously close to self-pity.
  16. This 3-D cave-diving adventure plays on a lot of fears, so avoid it if you have an aversion to claustrophobia, drowning or really bad acting.
  17. It's another episodic, shaggy-dog parade of L.A. denizens caught in moderately compromised positions.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    What’s missing is the onstage archival footage that would show us why this humor mattered in the first place—there are only a handful of five-second snippets.
  18. Why introduce two female characters — played by Kate Bosworth and Winona Ryder, both excelling at trashy desperation — if the script’s ultimately going to forget them? The worst sin is visited upon Statham: Sure, those fists fly, but his poetry has become a chopped-up hash.
  19. The story — aside from a climax that plays like a too-knowing rebuke to Disney formula — goes tediously through the motions. It isn’t only Papa Walt’s head that’s been put on ice.
  20. The big absence here is the man himself; Gibney couldn’t get the jailed Abramoff on camera, either due to unwillingness or a Justice Department intervention. Whatever the reason, it’s crippling.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The Fast and the Furious movies haven't exactly gotten better as they've gone along.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    There's one crucial lesson that Baker hasn't absorbed, however: Don't get too caught up in plotting, especially when it involves a man warming to an unwanted child.
  21. Not since a Nam-scarred Sly Stallone asked, "Do we get to win this time?" in "Rambo: First Blood Part II" has an American action star been deployed to rewrite history so thoroughly.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    This rom-com certainly has something old, something borrowed and something blue-the something new, however, is MIA.
  22. Despite the subtitles, it's basically a slice of formulaic Hollywood-style mythmaking, writ large and woefully empty.

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