Time's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 1,656 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Kill Bill: Vol. 1
Lowest review score: 0 Untraceable
Score distribution:
1,656 movie reviews
  1. Yet how can one possibly recommend The Salton Sea? If it could, this nasty film would make you smell the disgusting food on the table. And that says nothing about its casual sadism.
  2. Braveheart is too much, too late.
  3. It's great to have the Moose back, but it would be greater still to see him in a humorous context fully worth of him.
  4. As rigged as a casino slot machine, preying on people's hopes but paying off only for the house.
  5. It's a brilliant idea, for about 10 minutes. Then the bare set is elbowed out of a viewer's mind by the threadbare plot and characterizations.
  6. It's pretty awful.
  7. An uninvolving muddle.
  8. Crude and inept.
  9. Pretty lame. Sharkboy has an especially frantic, amateur atmosphere, with a mostly maladroit cast.
  10. It could be a distillation of some unaired black soap opera, so predictable are the plot contrivances--adultery, pregnancy, illness, missing money--and so cartoonishly are the characters drawn.
  11. The screenwriters, Randall McCormick and Jeff Nathanson, and the director, Jan de Bont, have no interest in providing their actors with stuff to act.
  12. There's evocative atmosphere in the period detail and perky faux-'60s tunes. A pity these are wasted in a movie that, like many a pop tune, has a cute idea but a simpleminded lyric.
  13. Jennifer Jason Leigh's draggy performance as Parker is all studied accent (something vaguely mid- Atlantic but never before heard on Earth) and equally studied self-pity and it cannot sustain our sympathy, or our interest in this inept film.
  14. This is, or was, a true story, but invested as it is with relentlessly cliched emotions, it plays like cheap fiction.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    In his first big Hollywood film, French superstar Gerard Depardieu cheerfully goes slumming with sex, lies, and videotape's Andie MacDowell. Peter Weir's comedy offers a little charm, less story and virtually no movie.
  15. His is a dispassionate sensibility, and he is not a strong enough actor - nor has he a strong enough intelligence - to fight his way out of the false analogy he has drawn between moviemaking and tragic history in the making.
  16. The Coens have deliberately cut themselves off from their best subject. Try as they will to create a vision of corporate (and urban) hellishness through sheer stylishness, theirs is a truly abstract expressionism, at once heavy, lifeless and dry.
  17. Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's screenplay is less a response to its source than a careful college outline of it.
  18. Like Saturday Night Fever and, for that matter, the Rocky films, Flashdance has made it big by taking experiences of black youths and playing them in whiteface. But unlike its grittily romantic predecessors, Flashdance is pure glitz.
  19. The problem is that the high-pitched whine of Allie's character finally vitiates not merely the viewer's sympathy for him, but sympathy for the movie he dominates, despite the care and courage that went into its making.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Director Adrian Lyne has encapsulated the cliches of three decades in a single dreadful and hysterical movie.
  20. It's a startling, exhausting spectacle - and, like the rest of Leigh's performance, very, very bad.
  21. The canniest moments in the three-plus hours of Nixon, Oliver Stone's dense, ultimately disappointing biopic, capture Nixon at his most pathetically endearing--the Commander in Chief as klutz.
  22. Alas, The Outsiders is not quite a good one. Because it falls in with the undulating rhythm of the life of its heroes, for whom a fatal fight and a quiet night have almost equal importance, the picture never manages to reach the peaks of satisfying Hollywood melodrama.
  23. The film is basically a drag, and not helped by Christopher Cain's stand- around direction. And one's thirst for the clear, cool taste of traditional narrative -- motivated movement, defined antagonists, building suspense -- soon reaches maddening levels. A grownup could die in this wasteland. [5 Sept 1988, p.63]
  24. There are, of course, low cunning, high explosives and much running around without a shirt, punctuated with other familiar gambits: torture scenes; the self-cauterization of, and instant recovery from, a wound large enough to stop an elephant; and a grimly preposterous two-man stand against a tank-led army. What few are likely to find amusing is Rambo III's story line. [30 May 1988, p.64]
    • 79 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Though the freckle-faced Reno and Mickey Rooney (as the horse's crafty old trainer) are well cast, then-scenes together are perfunctory and impersonal. Emotions are provided in stead by a busy and overbearing musical score. The film's story begins to move in fits and starts.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    By the time Scenarist Allen and Director Fosse have wrung them out, what's left - with one exception - is mostly slack and sour.
  25. Rarely have so many gifted women labored so tastefully to bring forth such a wee, lockjawed mouse.
  26. If you consider what the exalted quartet of Branagh, Pinter, Caine and Law might have done with the project, and what they did to it, Sleuth has to be the worst prestige movie of the year.

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