Total Film's Scores

  • Movies
For 798 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Blue Is the Warmest Color
Lowest review score: 20 Free Birds
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 17 out of 798
798 movie reviews
  1. The sci-fi premise seems preposterous, but get beyond that and Gedeck’s predicament absorbs.
  2. Tamer than the book and not as funny, this is Salmon filleted. But McGregor and Blunt make fetching lovebirds, while Kristin Scott Thomas is off the scale in a rare comic outing.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ocean’s Eleven meets The Prestige? Not quite. Starts well, ends in a heap, but in between there’s just enough splash and flash to distract from the lack of substance
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A mixed return for Stillman, Damsels is so whimsically out of step it's like a time-travel comedy without the time travel. Fortunately, Gerwig and some dazzling dialogue save his blushes.
  3. Depending on taste, you’ll be left either barfing or laughing.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Vaughn and Wilson. eight years on from "Wedding Crashers," the pair successfully rekindle their irascible shtick.
  4. With Hill on co-scripting duties with Scott Pilgrim scribe Michael Bacall, 21 Jump Street was always going to live or die by its gags. Fortunately, it boasts that sweet-yet-dirty comedy that Hill revels in.
  5. Closer to Eli Roth than Sam Raimi, this brutal retread combines J-horror atmospherics with torture-porn kills. It’s more evisceration than invention but at least has the courage of its bloody-minded convictions.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    By the time it’s over, you’ll either be heading for the beach or vowing never to go in the water again.
  6. Lawrence’s mechanised menagerie and the directors’ stereoscopic smarts entertain most.
  7. Shame that the plotting favours narrative intrigue over character depth, creating a film whose message is witnessed rather than felt.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ashley Bell’s nuanced performance and a surprisingly pyrotechnic finale liven up a gloomy sequel. Title’s still nonsense, mind.
  8. The vagueness won't win Dumont new fans, but his enigmatic allegory of intertwined good and evil does linger in the mind.
  9. Massively unlikely, but compelling to the last, it makes a decent fist of conveying the strength of internet attachments, even if filtering the unfolding drama through endless computer screens becomes a well-worn device.
  10. The scuzz-chic visuals, sleaze-synth score and deep-cutting gore are effective, and shooting from the killer’s POV proves a valid USP. But Wood, despite giving his all, cannot match Joe Spinell’s unhinged turn in the original: nightmares in a damaged brain indeed.
  11. The thematic weight drags down the tension, yet just when it seems Janiak has forgotten the scares she pulls off a creepy finale.
  12. It ebbs away at the climax, but there’s 45 minutes where it sings loud and strange.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Without much in the way of nudge-wink Pixar-style humour and pathos, mums and dads are less likely to be quite so enthralled.
  13. It might look as though Hallmark, Benetton and Richard Curtis have collaborated on a movie, but Chelsom’s lightly subversive, self-aware tone bolsters Pegg’s best shot yet at a mass-appeal crowd-pleaser.
  14. It’s hard not to be moved by the story, but it’s only a handful of great performances that save it from underwhelming. Steal the book instead.
  15. Mostly, it’s a study of an analogue ghost turned digital star; yet because Maloof is vested in building Maier’s reputation, the film leaves some uncomfortable questions about the ethics of posthumous fame.
  16. It's a must see for fans of roar footage.
  17. [A] memorable, conventional account of a true maverick.
  18. Francesca Gregorini’s film stands or falls on a central mystery as silly as it is surreal. Fair play to Gregorini, though, for avoiding the temptation to deliver an outré slice of suburban Gothic; by framing events as melodrama, she can better examine themes of grief and motherhood.
  19. The film’s cryptic style obscures insight; just as the condition provides a scapegoat for neglecting Abby’s motives, so it prevents Passon from developing a sustained dramatic network. Satisfaction is fleeting.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Jalil Lespert’s film treats its hero with a high seriousness that not even Niney’s uncanny portrayal of YSL’s artistry and mental fragility can justify.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It isn’t a reboot or reimagining, refreshingly, but Oblivion plays like a stylised remix of superior sci-fi ground-breakers. Cruise and Kosinski: they might be an effective team, but pioneers they’re not.
  20. It's slight, sure, and there's a better, less-glossy film buried in the material, but warm performances redeem Crowe's agreeable return.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Logan Lerman delivers a career-making turn in this sweet, sincere film. It might not be a massive hit, but it will certainly ease a few paths through the awkwardness of adolescence.
  21. A brutal fusion of angst and action, this mini-epic gives the sword-and-sorcery genre a bleak, brusque new life. Watch it for some terrific limbchopping and a mighty turn by James Purefoy.
  22. Washington and Wahlberg are an effective double act in an intermittently exciting thriller with more twists than it needs. We’d love to see them partnered again, though perhaps as characters.
  23. Full of fizz, filth and fun, I’m So Excited! is like an ’80s retro-blast. Its scattershot comedy may not impress latecomers to Almodóvar’s career, but old-school fans will love it.
  24. Like all of Bay’s work, it’s over-the-top, brash and exhausting to watch. But like the lifestyle its characters aspire to, there’s an allure too.
  25. Despite some striking imagery and sterling FX work, Welsh writer/director Caradog W James’ expert use of limited resources doesn’t stretch as far as the subtlety-averse script.
  26. Christian Bale’s earnest, emotional turn sustains a thriller that throws a few mean jabs but staggers towards a punch-drunk resolution.
  27. The direction pummels and the cast impress, yet Berg’s war movie promises more than it delivers. Memories of Battleship are sunk, but that Oscar buzz may be a bit premature.
  28. A competent rather than classic follow-up. If the action feels generic at times, the addition of Watts, more Winslet and the strength of Woodley are worth watching.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's not quite "Before Sunrise" with mud and portaloos then, but warm vibes, buzzy crowd scenes and the two leads' enthusiasm will pull you through to the morning after.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A visually inventive, deliciously dark fairytale reheat. The story's far from the stuff of legend, but Theron makes for a ferocious meanie, helping to flush away "Mirror Mirror's" sugary aftertaste.
  29. The Expendables 3 marks a sizeable improvement on the first two outings.
  30. The 3D is completely redundant and the action sporadic but unexpected gearshifts provide plenty of narrative meat.
  31. It’s absorbing to a point, but adds little to what’s gone before.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The ghost of Tex Avery is alive and well in a frenetic sequel that does more than reheat and serve. Madagascar 4? Don't bet against it.
  32. An amusing, thoughtful romcom about love, literature and coming of age. Whatever age.
  33. Believably charts a girl’s coming of age but is eventually capsized by lurid melodrama.
  34. Engagingly off-centre, like Charlie Kaufman taking down Quentin Tarantino, this sunbaked shaggy-dog story is a place-holder film for McDonagh, and often closer to chaos than it is to genius.
  35. The restlessness of the camerawork may drive you to distraction, but director/co-writer Calin Peter Netzer’s film is held steady by Gheorghiu’s staunch performance.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Viewed as a Brit answer to ’70s and ’80s exploitation flicks, endless Seagal movies and First Blood (Dyer is rogue SAS; his colonel issues Trautman-esque warnings), it’s surprisingly decent.
  36. Despite the all-star talent, an overload of sight gags and an always-amiable vibe, Genndy Tartakovsky's monster house is a bit too loony for its own good.
  37. Next to message-laden, CG-soaked kids’ animations, SpongeBob stands alone. His return is a skittish but winning splash of nonsense: dip in.
  38. James DeMonaco’s blood-splattered thriller begins well before expiring slowly from multiple improbabilities.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s handsomely lensed, and when Cage and Cusack finally go nose-to-nose, the fur does fly.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Richard Laxton’s painterly film combines the gothic shadows of Hitchcock’s Rebecca with the gut-wrenching romance of A Royal Affair. The result is dark and offbeat, but as a murky anti-romance, Gray is undeniably effective.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If you can ignore the disturbing parallels with recent events, this middle-aged, Middle-American "Attack The Block" raises a laugh.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The kills are inventive but Noble’s baggy trousered butcher is too sympathetic, and his teenage victims too generic for this to be in anyway scary.
  39. Daniel Craig makes a decent fist of the narration. But you could also do without its gush about the “incredible journey” all beings on the planet share.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Mud
    More accessible than "Take Shelter" but not as powerful, Mud boasts stunning photography, a mesmerising lead and a strong evocation of Americana. McConaughey’s gold run continues…
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A fun if sporadically schizoid return to one of the brighter, brasher comic-bookers of recent years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though set in a divided country, it’s an effervescent period piece, edited with verve: Persiel combines recreations with archive footage, animation and home videos.
  40. Although a bit over-neat in its contrasts between the respective families, Like Father, Like Son remains an affecting film, thanks to Fukuyama’s understated turn and Koreeda’s typically graceful visual storytelling.
  41. Everybody does indeed have a plan in Ana Piterbarg’s ponderous Argentine noir – problem is, they’re all terrible.
  42. Exciting, in places, though a stranger to subtlety, it ticks all the genre boxes, but there’s something about its knowing noirisms that feels superficial rather than soaked-in.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Kirk, who wed Fischer in 2010, perfectly captures her all-thumbs charm, and ubiquitous character actor Messina steps into the lead with ease, showing off some impressive mime skills to boot.
  43. A solid outing for a re-Bourne hero that could, with a few key tweaks, generate another round of vehicles for the Clancy cash cow.
  44. Adams is as watchable as ever as Margaret, backed by fine support, but the problem lies with Waltz. He’s more caricature than character, and Burton proves unable to harness his energy as well as Tarantino did.
  45. Harper’s well-appointed sequel has strong performances even if the Woman becomes a supporting character in her own tale.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A classy cast and Frears' light touch can't help this innocent abroad dramedy into the winner's enclosure. More jeopardy, less laboured larking, and it could've romped home.
  46. It’s not groundbreaking, but the impressionistic approach at least strives for more than your standard-issue bio.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As a shocker, Scott Stewart’s (Priest) film is solid, but it’s the thoroughly depressing backdrop that you’ll take away.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A taut, tense yet hugely indebted debut, Ruairí Robinson’s survival horror manages to break free from its low-budget limitations but is hamstrung by its own love of the genre.
  47. As much as Nicholas Jarecki’s debut feature simmers, it never quite boils.
  48. Jordan’s apparent resolve to make an anti-Twilight unfortunately results in a movie that, if not for a fistful of moments of shock, style and excess, would be as drained of colour and tension as Ronan’s victims are of hemoglobin.
  49. Choosing quantity over quality, intensity over tension and big-screen thrills over low-fi shocks – this is probably what the zombie apocalypse will actually look like.
  50. There’s creepy dolls, cameras tipped on their side, blasts of white noise and a horny teenage Scooby gang helping Jared Harris’ Oxford prof stir up a poltergeist in the mind of a moody emo girl (Olivia Cooke).
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Looser, more conventional, and highly dependent on the enjoyably rambling bro-banter of NickKurtDale Inc, Horrible Bosses 2 is a mostly-cosy caper that gives off rather less blackly comic energy than its predecessor.
  51. Sagnier is appealing in her first real romantic role and there’s Gallic charm galore.
  52. The result is a love letter to the giallo genre spelled out in cut-up ransom-note writing – striking, but impossible to read.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Binoche is, as always, superb, but Malgorzata Szumowska's film won't tell you much about the oldest profession that you didn't already know – and Binoche's marital clashes feel like a standard feminist tract circa 1975.
  53. First-time writer/director Ritesh Batra deserves credit for mining gently captivating drama from a pitch that could have just ended with passive-aggressive Post-its left on the office fridge.
  54. Drags in places and not always certain of its tone but with a sprinkling of eye-bulging visuals that wink to Spielberg’s heyday. Give it a shot.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A solid enough war flick, but Spielberg doesn’t have too much to worry about yet.
  55. If you loved Pitch Perfect you’ll find plenty to enjoy here because it’s pretty much exactly the same film, but there’s enough wit and warmth that it feels like a worthwhile sequel.
  56. Assured if not inspired, Legacy keeps the Bourne engine ticking over without reaching top gear. The action's accomplished and Renner's fine. Without Matt Damon, however, it feels like a placeholder.
  57. Bright, punchy and earnest, Webb’s affable sequel is tough to dislike despite its tonal whiplash and clumsy script, which is redeemed by Garfield, Stone and DeHaan’s powerhouse trio.
  58. Loyal to the novel, but welcoming enough for newbies, Divergent does a decent if not jawdropping job of bringing its dystopian world to life.
  59. Hits all the routine beats but is plenty entertaining, with Pacino rediscovering his enviable pizazz to headline a quality ensemble.
  60. Thoughtfully shot by first-time director Karl Markovics, the only warmth comes from the stiffening cadavers.
  61. Fun when Jones is around, dull when he's not, it's all just a little bit of history repeating.
  62. Not the promised insider’s peek but Assayas and Binoche are still a potent combo, nailing the fragility of an actress facing the ageing process.
  63. Familiar territory, especially if you've seen "Hoop Dreams" and "Friday Night Lights," but the intimate style offers its own rewards.
  64. Childminders rejoice: the formulaic but family-friendly series is back and it's business as usual.
  65. Despite being as garish and manufactured as Perry's multi-coloured hair-don'ts, Part Of Me deserves kudos for allowing an element of unpredictability to intrude upon its tween exploitation and sugary vulgarity.
  66. Thorough if workmanlike documentary.
  67. Less about the thousands who died in the Nanking massacre than about how stunning it all looked, Zhang Yimou's epic puts Bale in the midst of a lavish nightmare.
  68. Curveballs are rare in this pop-umentary on Earth’s biggest boyband; but with lengthy gig clips, lots of cute mucking-about (segways, disguises, hiding in wheelie bins) and Harry’s shirt off within the first 10 minutes, Directioners won’t be disappointed.
  69. His state of mind goes some way to explaining the something-missing air of his last film, but it inspires to see how deeply he cares about his craft.
  70. Weighed down with daft new characters and an overstretched story, the prehistoric saga is looking a bit old. On the other hand, it still has Scrat –which is all any movie really needs…
  71. Pixar falls back on the tried and tested in an entertaining caper that will be a surefire kid pleaser this summer. Old favourites are always welcome, but it would have been nice to see some more new ideas too.
  72. Pioneer features underwater sequences so breathless they’ll thrill even James Cameron (director Erik Skjoldbjærg made the original Insomnia) but Petter’s truth-chasing is at times too frantic and melodramatic.
  73. It’s predictable, politically incorrect and too long – but a handful of really big chuckles excuse most of the cop-outs. There’s a much edgier film in here somewhere, but this one will definitely do.

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