TV Guide's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,167 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Away We Go
Lowest review score: 0 Strange Wilderness
Score distribution:
5,167 movie reviews
  1. Colossally entertaining.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The kind of brainy human comedy that only this formidable French auteur seems capable of making.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Without relying on dialogue, and once again making good but sparing use of Yo La Tengo's toasty guitar soundtrack, Reichardt proves herself a filmmaker with a masterful sense of the expressive purity of the passing moment.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Though the facts have been manipulated in the interests of drama--Gerry and Giuseppe were never imprisoned together, etc.--this has been done in a brave and responsible way, shedding light on an important episode in recent history.
  2. Crammed with outrageous turns of fortune and quicksilver shifts in tone, Almodovar's film is held together by performances so subtle and complex it's hard to single out only one as exceptional. But Cruz is astonishing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Love Story is actually better than Segal's previously released best-seller (written from his screenplay in order to promote the film). But then that's not saying much.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    An exciting dramatization of the strange events that marked the turning of the legal tide against Big Tobacco, and a particularly dark moment in the annals of CBS News.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Hopkins plays the cannibalistic doctor with a quiet, controlled erudition, lacing his performance with moments of black humor. His Lecter is a sort of satanic Sherlock Holmes whose spasms of violence are all the more terrifying because they erupt from beneath such an intelligent and refined mask.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Pure melodrama, but stylishly done, with finely tuned performances played out against meticulously realized settings.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The true star of this nerve-racking family crime drama, shot with a minimum of fuss by Ron Fortunato, is playwright and first-time screenwriter Kelly Masterson's deft script, which carefully develops each fatally flawed character and tells their stories in achronological flashbacks that seamlessly fit together like a jigsaw puzzle.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The picture as a whole benefits not merely from the excellent performances, but from its warm emotional core and its infectious love of people, topped off by a mature (though not jaded) sobriety about human limitations that thoroughly validates everything preceding it.
  3. The young actors are charming, O'Toole commands every scene he's in, the scenery is lush, and the animals are gorgeous.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    The film's highlights are far and away the musical performances.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A bold, vibrant piece of filmmaking.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Chilean filmmaker Patricio Guzman's powerful and sometimes triumphant documentary is not only an excellent overview of the affair, but serves as the perfect finale to his monumental trilogy about the coup and its aftermath, which began with "The Battle of Chile" (1978).
  4. The second version of Graham Greene's sad and prescient 1955 novel about American involvement in Vietnam hews far closer to the book than the first, preserving the sophisticated ambiguity of his depiction of a tangled struggle for power played out on both personal and political fronts.
  5. Though the specifics of the story may be unfamiliar to Western viewers, its broad outlines and underlying themes are universal, and Christopher Doyle's ravishing cinematography transcends language.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For once, Thompson turns in a gimmick-free performance, and the rest of the actors range from fine to fabulous. But the whole thing feels stolid and uninspired.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Tragically, the title of James Longley's beautifully shot 90-minute documentary refers to not only the state in which he found the Iraq during the two years he spent there shooting over 300 hours of footage, but the structure the violent factionalism that divides Iraqi Sunnis, Shiites and Kurds imposes on his film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A marvelous, deceptively simple accomplishment shot on grainy 16mm film and featuring a cast of mostly nonprofessional actors delivering loosely written dialogue.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Dracula fans will appreciate the witty ways in which Maddin has drawn Stoker's troubling racism and xenophobia to the fore, while making the most of the sexual ambivalence that helps make the story endlessly fascinating.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Moodysson puts it across with a sincerity that's genuinely heartwarming, and he sets it all to a surprisingly good soundtrack culled from the Swedish rock (who knew?) of the era.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    And though the new Little Princess is a far darker affair than the 1939 version, Mexican-born director Alfonso Cuaron doesn't make it anywhere near as drab and moody as Agnieszka Holland's more artistically and commercially successful The Secret Garden.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This exciting, ultimately bittersweet, film was shot cheaply on video, but is nevertheless filled with moments of artistry and invention.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    His (Finkiel) ability to control economical dialogue with subtle but unusually powerful images -- haunted faces peering out from behind foggy bus windows; train tracks that once carried other passengers to a death camp -- lend this quiet, unforgettable film an uncanny power.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    One of the best movies Hollywood has ever made about itself, a extraordinary meta-narrative that continually questions its own ability to capture human experience, disappointment and uneventful loneliness. It's hilariously funny.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Hilarious and stunningly frank, writer-director Todd Solondz's evocation of awkward adolescence is a bracing antidote to the counterfeit nostalgia of "The Wonder Years" or "My So-Called Life".
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Alternating between the sad facts of Nascimento life -- which included a stretch at one of Rio's notorious prisons -- with the events unfolding outside the botanical garden, the film is a pulse-pounding piece of documentary reportage, and a terribly important account of a social problem in developing countries that won't be going away anytime soon.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    It's a humbling way of life, and one that, as Varda discovers in this wonderful, 80-minute essay, has survived in surprising ways.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The action is lightning-fast and balletically staged, living up to the choreographic potential often claimed--but seldom truly realized--for martial arts pictures by their highbrow admirers.

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