TV Guide's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,169 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Deep Water
Lowest review score: 0 The Hottie & the Nottie
Score distribution:
5,169 movie reviews
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Much imitated, still unsurpassed. By critical consensus one of the best movies ever made, The Seven Samurai covers so much emotional, historical, and cinematic ground that that it demands to be viewed over and over again.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A searing example of writer-director Billy Wilder at his most brilliantly misanthropic. An uncompromising portrait of human nature at its worst, the film was so far ahead of its time in its depiction of a media circus and the public's appetite for tragedy that it was a commercial disaster when first released, but now stands as one of the great American films of the 1950s.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Captures the sleazy allure of Manhattan like no other film.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The one and only; an unqualified masterpiece and milestone.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    David Lean's splendid biography of the enigmatic T.E. Lawrence paints a complex portrait of the desert-loving Englishman who united Arab tribes in battle against the Ottoman Turks during WWI.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Only a spirited and extravagant production could do justice to the Robin Hood legend; this film is more than equal to the task. Korngold's score won a well-deserved Oscar, as did the editing and art direction.
  1. Stands separate from the rest, in a pantheon, a true cinematic masterwork of sight, sound, intelligence, and most importantly--passion.
  2. Manages to inject more than a little humor into this tension-filled genre classic.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Godfather is a generational saga; it's also an action film; but above all, it catches the imagination of audiences because it suggests that the career of a gangster is not so very different from the career of a businessman or a politician.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the greatest films of all time and one of the handful of masterpieces to emerge from the Italian neo-realist period, Umberto D is as cerebral as it is emotional, as bleak as it is warm.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Kubrick's liberal, anti-authoritarian reading of Anthony Burgess's very Catholic allegorical novel is morally confused but tremendously powerful... No serious moviegoer can afford to ignore it.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Steven Spielberg has achieved something close to the impossible--a morally serious, aesthetically stunning historical epic that is nonetheless readily accessible to a mass audience.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The film is a model of barely controlled hysteria in which the absurdity of hypermasculine Cold War posturing becomes devastatingly funny--and at the same time nightmarishly frightening in its accuracy.
  3. Serenely stunning.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    No other motion picture about Hollywood comes near Billy Wilder's searing, uncompromising and utterly fascinating portrait of the film community.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A wonderfully brooding, suspenseful revisitation of the land of film noir, Chinatown is not only one of the greatest detective films, but one of the most perfectly constructed of all films.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This great film, made with uncompromising honesty and devastating reality, is, according to Jean-Luc Godard, "the world in an hour and a half."
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Cinematographer Willis superbly captures the turn-of-the-century period, applying a seriographic tint to flashback scenes for a softer, richer look than the sharp image of the ongoing contemporary story.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the most powerful boxing films ever made.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Not a frame is wasted in this taut, superbly directed, masterfully acted film, the first so-called "adult Western." (Review of Original Release)
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A masterpiece. It is a credit to Cocteau's genius (and to that of his collaborators) that he has taken the unreal world of a fairy tale and made it as real as the world around us.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An undeniably brilliant, nightmarish portrait of one man's personal hell. (Review of original release)
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    If one masterpiece were to emerge from the recent glut of generally good quality Japanese horror movie, this chilling apocalyptic ghost story from Kyroshi Kurosawa is it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Cheung gives a revelatory performance.
  4. But the real marvel is that beneath the ghoulish in-jokes and horror-geek allusions, there's a core of the same bittersweet truth that makes the best fairy tales resonate from one generation to the next.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    There are moments of such breathtaking grace and artistry that you'd be forgiven for thinking you're watching the most beautiful movie ever made.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Actor-turned-writer Dan Futterman's smart, subtle screenplay, which explores both Capote's determination to turn murder into literature and the deeply troubling questions he raised in the process.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Of all the feature films and documentaries to emerge since 9/11, few have been as bold, perceptive or as downright chilling as this thriller.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sergio Leone's masterpiece. In Once Upon a Time in the West, Leone pulls together all the themes, characterizations, visuals, humor, and musical experiments of the three "Dollars" films and comes up with a true epic western. It is a stunning, operatic film of breadth, detail, and stature that deserves to be considered among the greatest westerns ever made. (Review of Original Release)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Beautifully acted, structurally sophisticated heart-tugger.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Hadzihalilovic succeeds brilliantly at crafting a meaningful enigma that somehow grasps the essence of adolescence, but only grows more mysterious with each revelation.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Visually stunning adventure. (Review of Original Release)
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A slow-paced but hypnotically absorbing movie, it's buoyed by Jarmusch's trademark off-key humor and embellished throughout by an electrifying instrumental score, courtesy of Neil Young.
  5. The appealing Knightley goes in a promising young actress and comes out a star, but the faultless cast of veterans and fresh-faced newcomers imbues every character with flawed and immensely appealing humanity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Jordan and McCabe's real triumph here, however, is the tenderness with which they imbues "Kitten," and the astonishing grace with which the extraordinary Murphy pulls it off.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of Bertolucci's best films, The Conformist makes a provocative connection between repressed sexual desires and fascist politics. It's an intriguing, elegantly photographed study of the twisted Italian character of the 1930s. (Review of Original Release)
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Warmly funny and very moving.
  6. But overall, Jackson goes for the magic by sidestepping every error of judgment and failure of imagination that brought the ponderous 1976 remake thudding to Earth before Kong ever did. He delivers three solid hours of breathless, enchanting entertainment.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This exceptional film features some of the most beautiful cinematography ever seen on film, in service of some of the most horrible images imaginable.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Rather than adapt the novel per se, Winterbottom has adapted Sterne's hilarious attempts to make the mess of life fit the neat contours of the novel by making a movie about an attempt to make Sterne's chaotic and confusing novel fit the contours of a film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    First-time feature director Sanaa Hamri's virtually perfect romantic comedy is a marvelous mix of brains and heart that confronts serious questions about race and dating with sensitivity, humor and enormous sex appeal.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Powerful crime drama does more than just expose the criminal underbelly of South African township life.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Shakespeare himself couldn't have written better or more complex characters, and far from strange, by the end of this extraordinary film you couldn't imagine Shakespeare performed anywhere else.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Even Wong's detractors, who consider him more stylist than auteur, will have a tough time dismissing the extraordinary emotional depth he achieves here.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Basilio narrates his tale with such wit and wisdom that one comes away from the film wondering how much youthful potential is slowly being choked to death deep within the bowels of the earth.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Throughout this raw, often brilliant drama, the Dardennes refuse to judge these deeply flawed characters. They instead maintain a moral objectivity that ultimately leaves room for the possibility of redemption, no matter how dire the sins committed.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Malick endows this simple, timeless story with the enormous scope and resonance of myth through a clear vision unclouded by sentimentality and by a deft juxtaposition of image, music, and character.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Zieger's thoroughly researched film is a vital reminder that beginning in the mid-'60s, a few conscience-stricken military individuals -- including dermatologist Dr. Howard Levy, sickened by cynical attempts to win Vietnamese "hearts and minds" through medical treatment, and Navy nurse Susan Schnall, who wore her uniform to a civilian antiwar demonstration -- actively and openly voiced peace sentiments.
  7. Cornish's raw, nuanced performance and Shortland's sympathetic but unsentimental portrayal of Heidi's fumbling steps toward maturity are underscored by Sydney-based band Decoder Ring's catchy, angst-ridden score.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Repulsion has often been compared to "Psycho," but Polanski's film, rather than presenting a portrait of a psychotic killer from outside, pulls the audience into the crazed individual's mind. (Review of Original Release)
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    One of the most harrowing, viscerally upsetting films ever made.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    It's full of humor, pathos and a deep humanism that comes as a warm blast in this age of lifeless, cinematic junk.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    It's simply one of the most beautiful films he's (Hou Hsiao Hsien) made to date.
  8. It concludes Park's trilogy on a dual note of circular tragedy and fragile hope, while working equally well as an introduction to his universe of retribution and repentance or as a stand-alone thriller with a darkly feminist twist.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    What makes husband-and-wife directing team Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris' hilarious debut such a great family film isn't that it's suitable for the whole family (it's not), but that it speaks a simple truth about what it means to be part of one.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    One of the most perceptive movies about the gentrification of Los Angeles.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Superb drama from New York-based filmmakers Ryan Flek and Anna Boden.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A marvelous, deceptively simple accomplishment shot on grainy 16mm film and featuring a cast of mostly nonprofessional actors delivering loosely written dialogue.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Once again, Field has crafted and grown-up movie that grabs you by the throat, drags you in and doesn't let you go until the very bitter end.
  9. A thrilling return to form.
  10. Despite the absence of dialogue -- the mice squeak and the oak creatures caw like ravens -- Cegavske imbues her scrappy little creatures with disturbingly complex personalities. And if the tale's moral is less than clear, its haunting images speak directly to some dark, preverbal corner of the heart.
  11. Director Carl Franklin, who also adapted the screenplay from Walter Mosley's prize-winning novel, isn't particularly concerned with the machinations of mystery plots. Nor is he seduced by the temptations of noir visual style (although Tak Fujimoto's camera work is plenty stylish).
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    This is a powerful, important and, in the end, profoundly poignant movie dedicated to the lives of men and women who fight wars and shoulder the burden of becoming "heroes" to help the rest of us make sense of what remains incomprehensible.
  12. Crammed with outrageous turns of fortune and quicksilver shifts in tone, Almodovar's film is held together by performances so subtle and complex it's hard to single out only one as exceptional. But Cruz is astonishing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Tragically, the title of James Longley's beautifully shot 90-minute documentary refers to not only the state in which he found the Iraq during the two years he spent there shooting over 300 hours of footage, but the structure the violent factionalism that divides Iraqi Sunnis, Shiites and Kurds imposes on his film.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    After reminding us that the AIDS crisis in the West is far from over in "The Event," Fitzgerald widened his scope with this much-needed perspective on the global dimensions the disease has achieved. Despite the importance and seriousness of the subject, there's plenty of Fitzgerald's brand of sly humor on hand, particularly in the scenes involving the Quebecoise porn industry.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A tense and tightly plotted fictional thriller is based on real tactics used by the Stasi -- East Germany's secret police force -- to spy on and interrogate their own citizens.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    On the list of WWII stories criminally ignored by six decades of combat movies in the past 60 years, the heroics of French colonial soldiers ranks pretty high. But Rachid Bouchareb's powerful drama -- which won the 2006 Cannes Film Festival's best-actors award for its superb ensemble cast and was nominated for a best foreign-language-film Oscar, went a long way toward rectifying the situation, both on screen and in real life.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    In the end, it's best to make peace with the film's essential and deliberate inscrutability -- something Lynch fans have learned to do since Twin Peaks -- and to simply marvel at Dern's astonishing performance, which few actresses are likely to top anytime soon.
  13. Del Toro's film ranks with the best examinations of children's inner lives, but be warned: Its haunting insights are best left to adults.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    All behave in ways that may at first seem incomprehensible, but through Moncrieff's expert storytelling, each woman is finally rendered merely human.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    A small comic masterpiece that dares to deal with that of which many Sicilians dare not speak: the Mafia.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    German filmmaker Malte Ludin's gripping documentary about the father he barely knew is both an extraordinary exercise in family history and an example of what Germans call Vergangenheitsbewaeltigung: "facing the past," particularly the years of Hitler's Third Reich.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Released simultaneously in the U.S. with Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's Oscar-nominated fictional thriller "The Lives of Others," this chilling 82-minute documentary about three souls destroyed by the Stasi, the notorious secret police of East Germany, puts a cold, factual gloss on what might otherwise be taken for fiction.
  14. Fincher gets it all right, and Donovan's hippie-dippy "Hurdy Gurdy Man," which bookends the story, has never sounded so hauntingly menacing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Bright cunningly translates the story of Little Red Riding Hood into the trashy vernacular of tabloid TV and reality-based cop shows.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Caton-Jones' refusal to pull back on showing exactly what happened to the 800,000 Rwandans who were murdered that spring means that strong stomachs and even stronger nerves are required, but the film demands to be seen by anyone attempting to grasp how -- and just how quickly -- genocide can occur.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This grand and powerful biography begins in 1908 when, at the age of three, Pu Yi was named emperor of China and follows him through a tumultuous life inextricably intertwined with the history of modern-day China, one that that ended with the once-coddled emperor working quietly as a gardener at Peking's Botanical Gardens.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Brilliantly conceived, imaginatively structured, superbly written, stylishly composed and photographed, and very often wryly funny, Killer of Sheep lives up to its official designation as a national treasure.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A remarkably revealing documentary.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    n a remarkable directorial effort, Eastwood shows a great flair for atmosphere and composition and presents a nuanced, complex, humane portrait of Parker's talents, obstacles, virtues and failings. Whitaker gives a towering performance as the tortured musical genius, and Venora is equally impressive as the independent, compassionate Chan.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There is much to recommend in this film, and sheer energy pours off the screen in every frame.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    By common consensus, Stop Making Sense is the best concert film ever made.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A gorgeous, fluid, wonderfully exhilarating movie.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Deliriously expressionistic visually and aurally.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of Coppola's very best.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Shattering social and sexual conventions, Last Tango in Paris stands as one of Bernardo Bertolucci's finer achievements.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Deft comedy set in a neurotic town. People may argue about the relative merits of Annie Hall vis-a-vis Manhattan, which is a better and more fully realized film. By this time Allen had forsworn the glib one-liner and spent more time developing well-rounded characters.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As a remake, The Fly transcends the original, taking it in new directions and exploring its underutilized potential.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The film is flushed with bright light and cartoon hues, nicely accenting the fast-paced stew of incidents.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Gus Van Sant's direction here is supremely confident, fusing witty camerawork, neat editing, and a jazz-oriented score to make Drugstore Cowboy an exhilaratingly bumpy ride.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sure-footed thriller, beautifully photographed, with Ford's best performance thus far.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    Zoo
    Bold and unforgettable meditation on a truly bizarre incident that pokes at the very heart of one of our culture's biggest taboos.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Director Weir and cinematographer Russell Boyd's re-creation of the invasion and battle action is stunning, but what makes Gallipoli such an affecting film is its intimate presentation of the friendship between Archy and Frank (wonderfully essayed by Lee and Gibson).
  15. Kramer vs. Kramer is, essentially, a television movie that was raised into the feature category by the excellence of the execution.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A beautiful, at times poetic exercise in excess from Brian De Palma.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Diner is an often hilarious, frequently touching film.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Powerful, haunting, and at times very moving, The Last Temptation of Christ presents its account of the events and conflicts of Christ's life with a depth of dramatized feeling and motivation that renders them freshly compelling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Mike Nichols, in his first venture into movies since "The Fortune," elicited superlative performances from the actors, particularly Streep and stage veteran Sudi Bond.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ken Fox
    In the end, Haar's powerful and terribly sad film speaks volumes, not just about life in contemporary Israel, but in the U.S. as well.

Top Trailers