Under The Radar's Scores

For 120 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 95 Hannibal: Season 3
Lowest review score: 10 Outsourced: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 64 out of 64
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 64
  3. Negative: 0 out of 64
64 tv reviews
  1. It sounds a tried and true setup, but Master of None immediately breaks the mold, infusing the struggling actor formula with a touching helping of both heart and humor.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's not going too far to say Eastbound and Down holds a magnifying glass up to sports and hero workship, it's just that the magnifying glass is outrageously outsized, Charlie Chaplin, silent-movie prop huge. Sadly, as far as McBride takes Powers, the satire may never go far enough, as LeBron James and Roger Clemens and Tiger Woods and a host of others have shown.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The real heart here is the Jennings family. It's what make The Americans a better show than most, and what keeps it a show to watch heading into its second season.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Writer Terence Winter (The Sopranos) delivers the most exciting new series in recent history with Boardwalk Empire, a sweeping Prohibition gangster saga that redefines the boundaries of television storytelling.
  2. With several seasons under their belt, they effortlessly inhabit the hundreds of characters that populate their vision of Portland. That vision is simultaneously expanding and tightening.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Roiland and Harmon have put together a finely balanced show, with infinite possibilities that leave the door open for an exciting future.
  3. It is hard to find a suitable middle ground, when neither protagonist wants to implicate him/herself. That--this puzzle of what really happened--might be the genius of the show, but it's also frequently its great frustration. If audiences aren't fully engaged while watching Noah's point of view, then having to rewatch everything a second time around from Alison's perspective will be painful.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    The series has also been acquainted with theologically bent ideas, but the trajectory points to the series' characters becoming manifestations of Biblical themes, concepts, and binaries. That they're able to get away with such hard to sell content and pull it off with such aplomb is proof yet that Hannibal, so often a cut above the rest, gets away with delicious murder.
  4. Every bit as gripping as this year's earlier docu-series hit, Making a Murderer is the anti-The Jinx.
  5. Season three makes no significant step forward, but improves by spreading its charm out to the supporting cast.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though Season 3's content remains iron-clad, the proliferation forces things closer to the territory of having "forgotten" episodes, watering down the power of Brooker and his team's vision. More is seductive, but beware dilution.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While it's a well-produced and entertaining series, it's disappointing to see writers and filmmakers heading back to the well to rehash lesser John le Carré works when current spy novelists like Olen Steinhauer, Charles Cumming, and Chris Pavone have modern novels that could easily be adapted--and likely with superior results.
  6. Hirst transports us to a fascinating and brutal world, combining fact with fast-paced fiction into a show, the likes of which come around all too infrequently. As Ragnar does, so too does Season Three of Vikings expand its worldview beyond the inlet at Kattegat and into Medieval Europe, promising battles, glory, and adventures not to be missed.
  7. The story serves as little more than set pieces to the real conflict here, which is Clara's relationship with The Doctor.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Overall, the show could have used a little tightening (it might be time to rethink the 13-episode model, which Daredevil's second season ought to have already proven), and episodes can lag a little bit in the middle, but it's an enjoyable ride.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A German-language spy thriller cut from the same cloth as The Americans.
  8. Even without Walter White or Jesse Pinkman, Saul--with his bizarre acquaintances, his oily courtroom performances, his willingness to throw people under the bus to save himself, his me-first attitude, and his incredible potential for bad situations--makes for some darn good television.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A series pilot has to walk a rather tricky line of setting up a series premise, giving a hint of things to come, and, you know, being entertaining. As far as pilots go, NBC's The Good Place (from Parks and Creation co-creator Michael Schur) hits it out of the park with all of the above-not to mention some honest to goodness earned laughter.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sharply written and delivered with an acute self-awareness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not only are the fake documentaries of Documentary Now! hilarious, but doc fans are sure to embrace (while laughing) these studiously crafted pieces from creators Fred Armisen, Bill Hader, and Seth Myers for their loving attention to detail.
  9. An Adventure in Space and Time is a surprisingly moving docudrama that recounts the creation of the iconic British television series Doctor Who.
  10. Under this gorgeous dressing, The Knick feels curiously hollow.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's dark and, yes, gritty, but the tone fits the character, and it's obvious the series' creators have a real familiarity and affection for their source material.
  11. Part of what makes Supergirl work is the tone. Those who found Man of Steel too dark won't find much traction leveling similar complaints here, as Supergirl is full of light and hope, but not so much so that it doesn't have weight and drama.
  12. The Rayburns are, to a tee, well-trod stereotypes. Their dialogue is often as two-dimensional as they are, and when it veers more toward the melo than the drama, Bloodline can get down right corny.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Ten minutes into Ash vs. Evil Dead it's clear that the show is pulling none of the maximum blood-and-scare punches of the movies, and their humor is thankfully intact.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    If their latest appearance on Late Night with Seth Meyers as the Talking Heads parody band "Test Pattern" is any indication, Season Two isn't purely a high concept exercise in direct imitation, there will also be plenty of LOLs.
  13. This may not be the strongest first showing, but if it finds its rhythm soon, playing off of its existing strengths and shedding its weaknesses, this will be a compelling hour.
  14. Those two alone [Raymond "Red" Reddington (James Spader) and Liz Keen (Megan Boone)] are worth watching Blacklist, but the drama's storytelling is powerful enough to make you commit to it from the very first episode.
  15. David Wain and Michael Showalter's quirky brand of comedy is still the heart of the series, and works because it is so youthfully rudimentary, playing up romantic comedy tropes with bratty sneers and whimsy. First Day at Camp is essential summer TV viewing nobody asked for, but nobody's complaining either.

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