Variety's Scores

For 2,119 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 The Leftovers: Season 3
Lowest review score: 10 I Survived a Japanese Game Show: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 864
  2. Negative: 0 out of 864
864 tv reviews
  1. Impeccably cast, extremely handsome, predictably soapy and a trifle slow moving, it’s another first-rate costume drama.
  2. Frankly, six hours is a whole lot of time for any documentary, but the treasure trove of Python material ensures that Almost the Truth goes down smoothly, or at least almost so.
  3. What a bracing thrill-ride it is. .... There are so many ideas bouncing off each other and colliding in the new season that viewers may occasionally long for a quiet moment or two, but presumably things will settle down a little once the setup is out of the way.
  4. A a behind-the-music celebrity miniseries with a surprising sense of humor and humility. ... It helps also that Carey--through sheer charm--makes what is essentially an eight-episode misdirect so delightfully human and engaging.
  5. If the premise sounds cheesy and busy, the execution is crisp and efficient--and manages to sell dialogue like, "Together, we can take this city back," which often sounds better in a word balloon.
  6. Sit back, relax and savor a genuine treat infused with Hollywood nostalgia, riotous storytelling and only a few easily forgiven drops of mutual admiration.
  7. Prone to slow starts and whiz-bang finishes, Justified opens its fifth year in midseason form.
  8. Having settled on a solid core of players after some casualties along the way, the show forges ahead with a strong sense of momentum and vision, as well as an intricate mythology that connects the ancient evil of the series’ vampire race, the strigoi, to the past.
  9. Jane and Adams' interplay, the willingness to let the story gradually unfold and the project's disarming sensitivity (exemplified via a splendid fourth-episode guest shot by Margo Martindale) helps elevate Hung well above its gimmicky title--and gives HBO another improbable series that actually looks well worth hanging onto.
  10. Anne, Emily and Charlotte come vividly to life as they decide on their pseudonyms, engage with publishers via correspondence, and diligently crank out some of the works that eventually made them famous.
  11. Crews quirky mannerisms don't overwhelm the plot, and the show does strikes a nice balance between whimsy and its much darker backstory.
  12. The plot is a trifle chaotic, but the action culminates in an impressive sequence of special-effects derring-do and whooshing bloodsuckers.
  13. Lights Out isn't an unqualified knockout, but in its milieu, leading man and rich supporting players, score the show a clear winner on points. And that's no bull.
  14. Shows great series potential.
  15. Developments are doled out at a measured clip, and the filmmakers seem less interested in sustaining forward momentum than in painting a vivid panorama of this broken community, a town cloaked in a dark and vaguely incestuous malaise.
  16. The lessons the new Roots teaches over the course of its eight hours, which air on four consecutive nights, are worth revisiting, and a number of outstanding performances enliven this retelling of the story of Kunta Kinte and his descendants.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The show's minscule budget has turned into one of its greatest assets, using real-life Austin locales and citizens to bring an authenticity that only adds to the drama.
  17. The statistics used are occasionally mind-boggling (enough forest lost every year to cover Germany), and the stars’ intense reactions at times perhaps a little too studied. Nevertheless, the producers build a compelling case, and keep the production moving by flitting among two or three separate celeb investigators in each hour.
  18. While the climax isn't entirely satisfying, Pillars does create strong roles for its female characters, Natalia Woerner's earthy Ellen and Atwell's determined ingenue balancing Parish's delicious wickedness. Frankly, the whole exercise would be worth the price of admission (or rather, subscription) simply for the cobra-eyed McShane.
  19. The pilot rumbles forward on crisp action and light-hearted humor, while hinting at higher stakes that offer room for narrative growth. While easily dismissed as another "Alias" (like Jennifer Garner, Perabo can do wonderful things to a simple skirt and heels), the show also makes clever use of Walker's newbie status.
  20. Nothing here is especially groundbreaking. But Bloodline smartly dives into its soapy doings with multiple plots, as well as an impressive acting roster.
  21. Mostly, Judge has an unerring ear for pop culture and outright stupidity.
  22. The pilot represents a polished product that neatly introduces an array of characters and establishes Eastwick as a project with no small measure of potential. As for how well that's realized, as they say, the devil is in the details.
  23. Inevitably, there’s some overlap (“The Mary Tyler Moore Show” is cited in both of these first two hours), but Makers offers an evenhanded look at the barriers women have faced, while celebrating the accomplishments of those pioneers who have overcome them.
  24. While In Treatment isn't perfect by any means, given its uneven start and improbable origins, it's as good as anything with two characters yammering probably has a right to be.
  25. Even with the occasional fits and starts, The Detour looks like one of those shows that’s worth going out of one’s way to find.
  26. In episodes that alternate percolating energy with quiet ruminations on loyalty, leadership and the ways in which people lie to themselves and others, the satisfying third season builds up an admirable head of steam and gives the core cast (including the wonderful and previously under-used Toby Huss) and guest star Annabeth Gish smart material to work with.
  27. Those who love it aren't likely to get that itch scratched anywhere else. Like jazz, though, that's a relatively narrow audience, one that Simon--perhaps even more so than in "The Wire" and "Generation Kill"--has chosen, for better and worse, to uncompromisingly serve.
  28. People of Earth is TV comfort food of the most enjoyable sort. It may not be out of this world, but it’s consistently and reliably good. We should thank our lucky stars.
  29. The semi-serialized six-episode run has a dark, bittersweet quality, but despite some clever moments, F generally merits no more than a “B.”

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