Village Voice's Scores

For 10,487 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The Triplets of Belleville
Lowest review score: 0 My Father Die
Score distribution:
10487 movie reviews
  1. The story's outline may be familiar, but its emphasis and quality are not.
  2. Patient, observational film demands you surrender to it, that you keep your phone in your pocket, which means that movie theaters now sometimes offer a more unmediated look at the world than modern life itself.
  3. The year's most ingenious and original animated feature.
  4. This wondrous, absorbing little picture covers a great deal of winding meta-territory, reflecting on the ways in which a single family's story can be told—or maybe, more accurately, examining the idea that there's no such thing as a "single story."
  5. Laughton understood Agee's proximity to Grimm vaudeville, and fashioned the most intensely expressionistic movie of its day.
  6. The fights Virunga documents couldn't feel more urgent. This is one of the year's most compelling and important films.
  7. Raw and insistent, bold and brawling, Girlhood throbs with the global now, illustrating the ways an indifferent society boxes in the people who grow up in project-style boxes.
  8. To my mind, the greatest film by Iranian master Abbas Kiarostami.
  9. Voiceovers build on top of voiceovers, and we feel as if we’re simply getting to know these people a little better, even while Rees is gesturing toward things to come. The result is a deeply engrossing film — its two-plus hours whiz by — about stumbling one step forward and two steps back toward a more enlightened existence.
  10. Unclassifiable, expansive, and breathtaking.
  11. Nonchalantly freaky and uncommonly pleasurable, Warm Water may well be the year's best and most unpredictable comedy.
  12. Most docs are lucky to have one wild character. The phenomenal Finders Keepers has two.
  13. A crash course in history, politics, and social science, Valentino's Ghost is both sobering and illuminating, and its execution is thrilling.
  14. The film is consistently visually stunning in a way that's ever more rare, and Sissako's bravura moment of filmmaking is embedded in a scene on a river that seals the Tuareg patriarch's fate.
  15. This film, a great one, demands a follow-up.
  16. It might be the most lonesome film about a tropical vacation we've seen, and the greatest film ever made about the weird socioeconomics of tourism.
  17. This is a haunting puzzle of a movie, one to pick at, to unpeel, to see a second time through eyes that have adjusted to it. It's also alive with tender, tremulous feeling.
  18. In every respect, this unclassifiable movie is an amazing accomplishment.
  19. For passion, originality, and sustained chutzpah, this austere allegory of failed Christian charity and Old Testament payback is von Trier's strongest movie--a masterpiece, in fact.
  20. Yudin pulls lovely philosophical grace notes from his subjects as they illuminate some universal truths from their very specific world.
  21. With each step, the film gains depth. Small variations in routine start to feel monumental, and the briefest encounter can seem like a sign of something great.
  22. A perfectly paced and performed character study of a woman raising a child on her own who must contend with a heinous act of violence.
  23. Ultimately, what makes Knocked Up a terrific film--one of the year's best, easily--is its relaxed, shaggy vibe; if it feels improvised in places, that's because Apatow trusts his actors enough to let them make it up as they go, like the people they're playing.
  24. The movie, wry and melancholy, doesn't linger over its artistry.
  25. This is a film to see and then see again, to soak in and marvel at and -- like its director -- try to keep up with.
  26. Ernest & Celestine -- a contender for this year's best animated film Oscar -- is pure delight.
  27. Very little in Under the Skin is clear at all. Its secrets unspool in mysterious, supple ribbons, but that's part of its allure, and its great beauty.
  28. Thanks to Lynch's expert pacing and modulation of narrative tension, even viewers who already know the outcome of the film's central incident will likely be pulled to the edges of their seats.
  29. The film is restful and exhausting, inviting us into contemplation: of Tibet's epic-scale natural beauty, which has rarely been filmed with such you-are-there patience and intimacy, each new horizon these pilgrims reach a reward for their perseverance — and yours.
  30. Vera Drake puts the passion in compassion. Building up to a shattering conclusion, Leigh's movie is both outrageously schematic and powerfully humanist.

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