Wall Street Journal's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,190 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Sin Nombre
Lowest review score: 0 Pain & Gain
Score distribution:
2,190 movie reviews
  1. Meticulously crafted and beautifully performed.
    • Wall Street Journal
  2. This is a woman's work in the best sense -- empathetic, inferentially erotic and delicately intuitive, as well as fiercely intelligent.
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  3. (Morton's) character here is emotionally mute -- though Morvern speaks, she can't or won't reveal what's in her heart -- and her performance is brilliant from start to finish.
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  4. Mr. Tykwer's hands the movie changes almost magically from drama to chase to romance. As it does so its moral weight lessens; by the end there is less than what first engaged the mind. What meets the eye, though, is unforgettable.
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  5. Pulls you in with smooth assurance, then holds you hostage to extremely creepy developments in the most awesome haunted house since "The Shining."
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  6. The result is an enchanting story of love from an idealized past that endures in the mundane present.
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  7. The explosively combative young hero, Liam (a brilliant performance by Martin Compston), has only the illusion of a fighting chance. Yet Sweet Sixteen is powerful because of the searing honesty with which it strips Liam of his illusions.
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  8. Now the movie can be seen for what it was all along, remarkable by any standards.
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  9. Better than a feelgood movie, it's a feelgreat movie -- genuinely clever, affecting when you least expect it to be and funny from start to finish.
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  10. Persistently upends expectations without insult, as it pulls you into a netherworld filled with yearning, whimsy, and danger. [15 Dec 1992, p.A16(E)]
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  11. A wickedly astute and beautiful comedy of manners-cum-murder mystery, it's too dense, and occasionally confusing, to grasp fully the first time around. How lucky, then, that it's also too much fun to see just once.
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  12. Depends on comic timing so precise that it seems weightless and all but effortless. And it depends on performers, of course, who can do a comic turn just as readily as a deft writer can turn a phrase. In that department, Ocean's Eleven is at least 11 times blessed.
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  13. What it's about is also what it requires for proper appreciation -- the ability of the human mind to hold, and even cherish, diametrically opposite thoughts.
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  14. In the entertainment culture that surrounds us, words like "harrowing," "anguishing," "unfathomable" or "horrifying" don't sell movie tickets. Capturing the Friedmans is all of these things and more.
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  15. Shrewdly conceived, confidently executed and outrageously entertaining.
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  16. Ever since the movie made a brief appearance late last year to qualify for Oscar consideration, Mr. Caine's performance has been hailed as the best of his career, and surely that's true.
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  17. Since you can't read my lips, read my words: See this movie.
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  18. Ingeniously scary.
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  19. A film that is both touching and generous of spirit - and funny as well. [15 Dec 1988, p.A16(E)]
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  20. A romantic comedy of grace notes and mini-epiphanies -- mini, that is, except for Ms. McDormand's Jane, who is memorable to the max.
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  21. This beguiling fable, with its darkly distinctive look, does DreamWorks proud.
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  22. It's classic animation wedded to modern technology -- painted pictures that move in magical splendor.
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  23. Nair's movie, far from being paste, is a string of small, exquisite gems.
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  24. A glorious feature-length documentary -- This film will leave an indentment, and a deep one, on anyone who loves great, joyous music and cares about the people who make it.
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  25. Rarely has so scary a thriller been so well made, and never has digital video -- by the English cinematographer Anthony Dod Mantle -- been put to grittier use.
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  26. Everything and everyone is observed sharply, succinctly and indelibly.
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  27. Blissfully funny, terrifically intelligent and tender when you least expect it to be.
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  28. This screwball comedy about a scrappy Hawaiian kid and the rabidly destructive little alien she mistakes for a dog is powered by ferocious joy. And, remarkably, it manages to incorporate traditional Disney values, such as the sanctity of the family, in a visually bold, subversively witty package that's as far from corporate as mainstream movies get.
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  29. A movie of minimalist moments (Molly's tiniest gestures speak volumes) and lovely, almost holy tableaux.
    • Wall Street Journal
  30. Smart, surpassingly odd, extremely funny and mysteriously endearing at the same time.
    • Wall Street Journal

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