Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 473 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Sherlock: Season 3
Lowest review score: 10 Prime Suspect: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 341
  2. Negative: 0 out of 341
341 tv reviews
  1. A situation brimming with the potential for suspense, and irony. Those may yet emerge, if only someone produces a script to make it possible. For the moment, all that is brimming here is the evidence of an ill-advised faith in the drawing power of depressive police dramas.
  2. There is no edge to Dancing on Edge, a drama sunk by its pretensions--one, to be sure, that does come clanking to life somewhat in a madly melodramatic final episode. A long wait, for little.
  3. That no one acts in a manner remotely plausible during Murder in the First, regarding either the law or human life, will have viewers feeling like they're just being moved through the system.
  4. Judging from the first episode, "Emily" needs not only a new boyfriend, but also some more grownup material.
  5. The grotesqueries of "Dexter" are not something that can easily be dismissed with the old "you don't have to watch" line. We don't have to watch. We do have to live among the viewers who will be desensitized, or aroused, by this show.
  6. "The State Within" has so many inauthentic touches, that-would-never-happen moments, and is so often off in the details, that it's difficult to take seriously.
  7. We're left with a heap of hocus-pocus that will offend some viewers and seem pretentious or silly to others.
  8. Perhaps Tara will, over time, find something interesting to say. Perhaps it will be about the trauma that presumably led to the split in Tara's personality. Right now, however, what makes the show so painful is the abuse of her children, inflicted by Tara both in and out of split mode, and abetted by her pathologically laid-back husband.
  9. Suffice it to say that Bravo has found yet another group of not-very-appealing women to represent their gender and, more broadly speaking, the lifestyle of the heterosexual cheeseball.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    An early scene from this Tuesday’s premier of the new Fox series Mental, a drama about a psychiatric ward in a fictional Los Angeles hospital, is representative of the larger problems that plague this ill-conceived show.
  10. It was nothing short of painful recently to watch the first episode of NBC's "Who Do You Think You Are?"--one of the more interestingly focused reality shows--about efforts, by a handful of celebrities, to trace their ancestors
  11. Jules will search for self-esteem in frequent sex and the proof that she is still "hot." Such a quest could be made funny, but here it mostly isn't. Ms. Cox is struggling with some ugly material and often seems desperate.
  12. Gold Rush is jaw-dropping television. Not only are most of these men total boobs and incompetents, but their stupidity borders on criminal at times.
  13. Over five-plus hours, the miniseries would have had time to explore every nuance. But there are so few that rise above artifice, and so little dramatic action driving the plot, that even an actor as talented as Ms. Winslet can hardly fill the dead spaces.
  14. Some shading aside, some occasional twinges of remorse, nothing can hide the fact that these people have no souls to lose, no character to develop. Apart from looking for "Godfather" homage moments, there isn't more to root for here than there is at a cage fight.
  15. The real deficiency, the one that matters, that's evident in all of them is in the writing of comedy, the capacity to imagine characters--a lack impossible to overcome, and this case is no exception.
  16. House of Lies about the thievery of management consultants, manages to turn a theme with reasonable comedic potential into a vehicle for 16-year-old males, though dressed up as satire for sophisticates.
  17. It's clear that Mr. Sorkin's main interest in The Newsroom runs to concerns other than characters and storytelling.
  18. The problem is--as is ever the case in sitcoms with no future, and this is one of them--vapid writing and characters drawn according to formula.
  19. The greatest problem for Ms. Gummer, and everyone else in the cast, has to do with the script, a terminal case of the well-known vacant mind disorder, to which large quarters of the TV writing world are, it would seem, particularly susceptible.
  20. Start-Ups: Silicon Valley may be set in the Bay Area, but its heart beats on the Jersey Shore.
  21. Spontaneity is scripted; hopes and dreams are meant to be crushed; the woeful are exalted; characters are unsympathetic.
  22. Everyone seems to be imitating someone they saw in another gangster movie. It would be funny, if it weren't quite so tedious.
  23. Lots of hearts are likely to harden in resistance to the calculated grimness, the nightmarish images. Not to mention the preening incoherence that pervades this script based on a novel by Tom Perrotta, a work whose measured tone bears no resemblance whatever to the goings on here.
  24. Stalker won't get the kind of respect "Dexter" did, in part because it is more overtly cheezy in the generic showbiz way.
  25. Though Ms. Heigl does throw herself into those life-or-death presidential briefing decisions of hers--powers that could have been conceived only in the fantasies of desperate scriptwriters. They have much to be desperate about.
  26. In the three episodes HBO made available to reviewers, however, the only moment of transcendence for the viewer occurs when some of the characters take to the sea on their boards and ride the waves in an "Endless Summer" moment that comes as a blessed relief after the inexplicable chaos of what precedes it -- and is over too soon.
  27. Nonorganic dialogue quickly becomes boring for viewers. The directors seem to have lavished so much energy on the choreography of the sex scenes that they have nothing left for verbal expression.
  28. The main deadly force in Eli Stone is its scripts, which are ever so spritely in tone, ever so dumb in essence.
  29. The creators can be held responsible for enlarging the quantity of execrably written works on this theme [gay-themed sitcoms].

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