Wall Street Journal's Scores

For 664 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 The Night Of: Season 1
Lowest review score: 10 Graceland: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 470
  2. Negative: 0 out of 470
470 tv reviews
  1. Director Liz Garbus conveys much of the excitement and turmoil surrounding the subject of her documentary, Bobby Fischer Against the World.
  2. The arrival of one pure and unadulterated drama about a passion as old as man is something to celebrate. That's particularly true when that drama is as spellbinding in its satisfyingly gaudy way, as Revenge turns out to be.
  3. There's promise, plainly, of rich developments ahead.
  4. The lineup of episodes has been rich in their revelations, moving in their testaments to the lives of the employees and, especially, to the meaning to them of their daily labor. There is above all no simulated emotion in what those workers say, no artifice—a new and revolutionary turn for the genre.
  5. A wide-ranging work and a compelling one.
  6. Ms. Jones's president is compelling--a force to contend with. Much the same can be said of the new 24 itself--a force now returned in strength and, once again, highly addictive.
  7. Mr. Gervais has in no way lost his touch.
  8. How this works out over its many episodes isn't easy to predict, but we have, at minimum, a strong beginning--Zamani notwithstanding--one that reaches undeniably satisfying levels of menace.
  9. Season three's In Treatment [scripts are] entirely original. That may partly account for the so-far stagey quality of the episodes involving Jesse (Dane DeHaan), a 16-year-old gay male adoptee confronting a birth-mother problem....There is, otherwise, little that can detract from this series now roaring back with its old miraculous suspense and flinty intelligence.
  10. After the static and bloodless world of “The Girlfriend Experience,” the Showtime comedy Dice is like an explosion of heat and vigor and passion.
  11. [A] splendidly written work whose surprise ending is the kind worth waiting for.
  12. Matt Duffer and Ross Duffer, brothers and the show’s creators, have done their homework when it comes to ’80s cinema. Whether you’re a fan of John Carpenter’s “The Thing” or “The Goonies” is more your speed, there’s plenty to like in Stranger Things.
  13. Just two episodes of this 13-part series have been made available—enough to indicate the enormous care devoted to the look of the '40s, to the primitive living quarters. We get an immediate sense, as well, of the characters likely to command attention.
  14. It's a dramatic premise that should yield high rewards for Hostages, whose confident pilot episode ends with a cliffhanger worthy of the name--a kind that should bring audiences back lusting for more.
  15. There isn’t much that can pass for comedy here, but there’s plenty of compelling viciousness and two powerful performances.
  16. The story of rising (and falling) movie star Vince (Adrian Grenier) and his entourage of high-living pals is as amusing as ever; and as the show matures so, ever so slightly, do the characters.
  17. This workplace comedy comes out of the gate with instant appeal. Mr. Williams is never less than formidable in his delivery; the writing is never less than crisp and sometimes it's crisply hilarious.
  18. Most of the editors here have charm and pizazz that seem more appealing than the photographs they masterminded.
  19. A series about a high-school girl that's neither maudlin nor alarming nor conceived with intent to preach or to shock. It's further distinguished by its focus on entirely recognizable teenage pains, as endured by an entirely recognizable teenager, Jenna. Its other distinction: strong echoes of an older kind of storytelling, the sort whose characters grow and acquire depth.
  20. Despite some clumsy exposition by its creators, Jack Amiel and Michael Begler, it has a well-researched sense of place.
  21. Power is a frightening but easy-to-get-sucked-into fable about those last two paths to financial success [drug dealing and nightclubs].
  22. The truthful background of this high-stakes history makes it thrilling on a deeper level. Along with the battle scenes and other entertainments, the series reflects many challenges of today’s world.
  23. Who in this family has been plotting what against whom? That this quickly becomes, for the viewer, an urgent question says all that’s necessary about the story’s magnetic pull.
  24. It's an old story rolled out with all the power of the new--meticulously plotted, irresistibly suspenseful.
  25. Boss is not flawless. But buoyed by strong performances and a haunting score, the show makes for deeply affecting television nevertheless.
  26. For all its emotional agony and slow pacing at times, Happy Valley is always moving forward and the fifth episode explodes off the screen.
  27. The series is set in modern-day Rome, where the women wear tight skirts, the men are in sharp suits, and even the corruption is exquisite in its labyrinthine complexity.
  28. Judging from the premiere episode, Conviction is not just compelling and topical, it’s a master class in TV-series construction.
  29. It's all more like a steady burn--of talent, of smart writing, of chemical reactions--and it may take a few episodes to feel the heat.
  30. It is neither a cheap thrill or too painful to watch these lost souls being drilled in first impressions.

Top Trailers