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  • Series Premiere Date: Sep 26, 2001
  • Season #: 1 , 2 , 3 , 4
Star Trek: Enterprise Image
Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 18 Critics What's this?

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7.0

Generally favorable reviews- based on 34 Ratings

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  • Starring: Scott Bakula, Anthony Montgomery, Dominic Keating
  • Summary: "It's Good to be Home."Star Trek: Enterprise is the latest entry in the Star Trek saga and takes place during the mid-22nd century. Under the command of Captain Jonathan Archer, the crew of the first warp five starship (the Enterprise NX-01) begin to explore the galaxy. As their mission progresses, the crew encounter familiar races like the Klingons and Andorians as well as some new ones.Starting in the first episode, the Enterprise crew discover their time has become a front in the mysterious Temporal Cold War. They sometimes find themselves up against the Suliban, an aggressive race that is apart of a faction of the war and given orders by an unknown being from the future. In the second season finale, things take a deadly turn when an alien race named the Xindi attack Earth. With the Xindi preparing another attack and humanity facing destruction, the Enterprise crew have only one option. The third season sees the crew searching the mysterious Delphic Expanse for the Xindi and trying to stop them before their next attack. The fourth season has the crew back home and opening up brand new adventures, one with special guest Brent Spiner. As of season four, T'Pol has officially left the Vulcan High Command and joined Starfleet Command, she has been promoted to Commander.The theme tune for Enterprise is titled "Faith of the Heart", performed by Russell Watson and written by Diane Warren. Expand
  • Genre(s): Drama, Action & Adventure, Science Fiction
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 18
  2. Negative: 2 out of 18
  1. Reviewed by: David Bianculli
    Jun 25, 2013
    90
    The two-hour pilot is a wonderful show - the best start for a "Star Trek" series in its long and amazing history - and Bakula's instantly likable characterization is no small part of it. [24 Sep 2001]
  2. Reviewed by: Scott D. Pierce
    Jun 25, 2013
    80
    The two-hour pilot is very good and sets up what would appear to be a good premise for what will inevitably be a long-running series. The show looks good, the supporting cast is attractive and the characters are interesting, and "Enterprise" really does manage to spin what has become a science-fiction staple over the past 35 years in a new, exciting way. [25 Sep 2001]
  3. Reviewed by: Ed Bark
    Jun 25, 2013
    75
    It all comes together in impressive fashion, with Mr. Bakula primed and ready to take command and keep the faith. [23 Sep 2001]
  4. It's this sense of wonder that sets "Enterprise" apart from the more stodgy Star Trek offerings and injects some much-needed fresh energy into the 35-year-old franchise. [26 Sep 2001]
  5. Reviewed by: John Levesque
    Jun 25, 2013
    70
    It seems a little bolder than its most recent predecessors. [26 Sep 2001]
  6. Reviewed by: Joanne Ostrow
    Jun 25, 2013
    70
    Scott Bakula as Capt. Jonathan Archer is not as commanding a figure as some past captains. But his inexperience suits the prequel's tone. [26 Sep 2001]
  7. Reviewed by: David Segal
    Jun 25, 2013
    20
    Bakula gives the Capt. Kirk thing his best shot, but the script is riddled with clunkers and jargon. Worse, "Enterprise" has a bargain-basement feel that lands just this side of camp; the space fights aren't much more convincing than PlayStation offerings. And everything is wrapped in a trite message about unity and the importance of getting along. [26 Sep 2001]

See all 18 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 2
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 2
  3. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Jun 15, 2014
    9
    The most underrated of all the Trek shows, and not just in my exclusive opinion. It's abrupt cancellation suggests to me the fickle nature of the entertainment industry in the internet age. Neither Deep Space Nine, nor Voyage had strong starts, or consistently entertaining seasons. But they existed prior to the days the heavily critical and meme driven era of the internet took hold. I've suggested before, that if there had been a form of internet when the original Star Wars trilogy had premiered, they'd be as heavily derided as the prequels are online. There's a measure of peer pressure involved when discussing any type of genre series, and being for something that's normally mocked (just tell someone you liked Jar Jar), or weren't necessarily found of something with generally universal critical acclaim (maybe you weren't the greatest fan of Keaton's Batman), and you'll find yourself at the bottom of the cyber pile. And most people probably would rather just join in on the jokes, then have to defend their opinion at every turn. To the point where they think that was their opinion all along. Enterprise seems to fall victim to that way of thinking.

    Like some of it's predecessors, Enterprise didn't have the strongest start, nor the most interesting characters out the gate. The later is still not evidence of a bad, or poorly casted series, as a series normally needs to build characterization and interest in the cast before you'll ever start caring about them. Where it did fail, at first, was some of the preliminary stories weren't necessarily interesting. On Netflix, that's much easier to forgive. But if you've waited a whole week for a show that might not have captured your interest last episode, it was going to be harder to want to make the hour commitment again seven days later. Additionally, previous and current sci fi series, not just Star Treks, had set a considerably high bar for your average episode. Farscape and Babylon 5 had introduced us to the sweeping season/series long story arcs, and the self contained one-offs were not as compelling as the once were. And, let's face it, the modern-era Star Treks were found of taking risks with the more subdued, cerebral storylines that were often hit or miss. Sometimes they made you think. Sometimes they left you wondering "Wait, the episode is over already?".

    Given the chance, though, while ignoring any preconceived ideas, and the show had it's decided shining moments, and strong story arcs. Complaints that the show messed with Star Trek's timeline might be forgetting that almost every series retconned Star Trek history in small ways. And closer inspection of some of those complaints often reveals a lack of understanding, or a lack of having viewed the series in it's entirety. Character development happened early on, in spite of some of the less compelling early stories. But the introduction of the Xindi in Season 3, and Archer's struggles with the realization that Starfleet can't just be about exploration, but also defense, and sometimes offense (a Navy/NASA hybrid), give us some of the most thoughtful, and downright exciting episodes in the whole series. The show also throws us some out right fan appreciation in the form of filling in some details in specific Trek history, such as Data's ancestry, the consequences of a previous series crew's time travel adventures, why Klingons looked so different in the original series, and how we could have an century long rivalry with the Romulans without ever knowing what they looked like.
    Expand
  2. Dec 29, 2012
    7
    This is the Star Trek series which deviated most from the standard Star Trek formula. It was a very interesting premise to see the Federation forming from the start through the voyages of the first Starship Enterprise. Unfortunately, this show did not live up to what it could have been. Right away when we see the opening credits and hear the cheesy pop-music song being played we know this is not your standard Star Trek spin-off (I would have preferred an instrumental with the same footage personally). Once again Star Trek writers are trying to target non-Star Trek fans in vain... In my life I have learned, there are two types of people, those who love Star Trek and those who don't, you're never going to bring Star Trek to the people who don't. This is the one series where people that love Star Trek often say they don't like this series. The first season has some weak episodes, but so did TNG and Voyager so I can't really hold that against it. The thing I disliked the most about this series was the season-long story arcs. I am not fond of story arcs because I have a busy life and can't always be home at a certain time of the week to watch a show. Also, the story arcs were drawn out way longer then they needed to be drawn out. 2-3 episodes max is what I can tolerate. The original premise of them being out in space without The Federation, without shields or tractor beams, no prime directive, etc. was a great idea that could have lead to many exciting episodes. However, in no time at all there are other Federation ships around, they start thinking of a future rule set that should govern their ethics (ie: The Prime Directive), they invent force-fields, etc.. They even encounter The Borg on one occasion (although they do not actually see or figure out who The Borg are for consistency with the future series) . With all that being said it is not that bad a series to watch, and it did improve, especially in Season 4. But by that point it was already scheduled to be cancelled. But if you do watch this series you might want to skip the final episode, "These are the Voyages", it is the absolute worst Star Trek episode of any of the Star Trek series, here's why: SPOILER ALERT: instead of being just a regular episode TATV is a TNG holodeck episode -- LITERALLY!!! What I mean is they have Deanna Troy and William Riker (no joke!) on The Enterprise from TNG running a holodeck program of what happened on a historical day on the original Enterprise, sound cheesy? it is! But wait, it gets worse! We get to see cheesy, poorly produced scenes of lame flirting between Troy and Riker inbetween plays of the Holodeck program, one of the main Enterprise characters dies in a really forced, badly-directed and pointless way (the character deserved a much more meaningful and dramatic death than that at least). And all so Archer can get to Earth on time to give his speech which we wait in anticipation to hear the entire episode because it's all he's talking about! Of course we suspect it's the "To boldly go..." speech. So he finally gets to Earth at the end after he's finished saving the day in another solar system, and so now we get to see Archer read the Speech during that historical moment on the podium... OR NOT! ...Okay episodes over. NO SPEECH FROM ARCHER SHOWN AT ALL! Just a couple of 2 second shots of Star Ships from all of the series flying by in the future and... Credits 10 seconds later! I mean come on! Why were TNG characters showing up in this series? Why was it a stupid holodeck episode when you know most people even hate TNG holodeck episodes, and why? I mean WHY??? would you not show Archer starting to say his famous speech "Space, the final frontier..." I mean even if you cut to having Kirk, Picard, etc. saying portions of it afterwards it would still make sense, but nooooo we never hear it lol. The cast of Enterprise did not react well when they were presented with the script of the final episode, Jolene Blalock (T'Pol) is quoted as calling the episode "appalling". The final episode is an insult to the cast of Enterprise. Do yourself a favour if you watch this series just assume that the second last episode of season 4 is the final episode, it has a better conclusion and none of the BS of the actual final episode. But other than the final episode which is -5/10 (yes negative 5), the rest of the series was about a 7/10, worthwhile to watch but kind of disappointing. Expand

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