• Network: FX
  • Series Premiere Date: Sep 8, 2010
  • Season #: 1
User Score
8.6

Universal acclaim- based on 105 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 99 out of 105
  2. Negative: 2 out of 105

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  1. Dec 28, 2010
    3
    Terriers begins a right ship that heads in the completely wrong direction. The two main stars have great chemistry outside of "Hank" being unrealistically altruistic at times. The episode by episode cases as well as multi-episode plots than transpire in the first half dozen episodes are well paced, however this is unfortunately a short lived peak for the show. We are then treated to soap opera like themes, endless cliffhanger sub-plots, uninspired cases and no overall direction related to the fact that they are two guys doing PI work. If you are looking for cases of romance and infidelity this is your show. If you are looking for a show mainly about two guys and their endeavors as PIs this is not a good place to look, Expand
Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 24 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 24
  2. Negative: 1 out of 24
  1. Reviewed by: Alan Sepinwall
    90
    It's not an ambitious show. It doesn't have the historical sweep and dazzling visuals of something like HBO's upcoming "Boardwalk Empire." Yet in trying to tell good old-fashioned detective stories featuring a pair of leads I kept wanting to spend time with, it quickly joined "Boardwalk" as one of my two favorite new shows of this fall.
  2. 100
    Here's one of the most offbeat new shows of the new season. Also one of the best. [13 Sep 2010, p.48]
  3. Reviewed by: Troy Patterson
    50
    A typical episode of Terriers jolts abruptly from cutesy escapades to head-cracking fights, from loud escapism to misty tenderness, from easygoing comedy to strained seriousness. The tonal unevenness feels less like the conscious product of an ambitious design than the unplanned consequence of an exceedingly ambitious one.