Alison Willmore

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For 139 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alison Willmore's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Little Women
Lowest review score: 10 Tom Clancy’s Without Remorse
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 72 out of 139
  2. Negative: 15 out of 139
139 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    What it is, really, is a showbiz satire about media ownership and our nostalgia fixation, though it muddles its message before the tone gets too scathing. It is, after all, still a Disney movie, even if it takes a perverse pleasure in playing around with Disney’s vast catalogue of characters.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    All of the miseries that are revealed as the two men go about their day may be bleak, but the humor comes from the small indignities inflicted on them even as they try to go out with a bang.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Alison Willmore
    The mechanics of Sciamma’s film are simple, but they’re realized so delicately, and with the help of such unaffected child performances, that they feel miraculous.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    The Northman doesn’t invite its viewers into its world, but instead dares them to try to catch up.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    More than anything, Aline feels like a kamikaze act of wish fulfillment, wildly indulgent but so deeply committed to what it’s doing that it can’t help but be compelling.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    Everything Everywhere All at Once may be a kaleidoscopic fantasy battle across space, time, genres, and emotions, but it’s an incredibly moving family drama first.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    X
    Like most of West’s films, X is not particularly ambitious in its psychology or storytelling. It’s his technique that makes his work feel like it has one foot in the arthouse, with its elegant compositions and the way the camera moves as though daring us to see something the characters have yet to spot.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    Effervescent and ridiculous and grounded in a pastel-shaded Toronto and the nearby throwback details of 2002, it has texture and specificity to spare, and the only person it cares to speak on behalf of is its 13-year-old heroine, Meilin Lee (Rosalie Chiang).
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Alison Willmore
    After Yang has the structure of a subdued mystery, though at its core it has no answers to these, or any, questions. Instead, it provides a slowly dawning and utterly devastating understanding of the hidden richness of its title character’s existence.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Kimi threads its increasingly tense interactions with a modern melancholy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    It’s so unapologetically absurd and so very fun.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    As is often the case with Hosoda, it’s the extracurricular details that make his work so moving, the textures of the everyday lives of his characters that become something larger and more profound when placed in contrast to the genre elements at the center of his story.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    It plays like a movie-length bout of aversion therapy aimed at our instinctive fondness for motor-mouthed strivers with Mikey’s every small victory creating more dread.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    Licorice Pizza — a movie as exasperating as it is delightful — could be described as an exploration of the unstable ground where Alana’s arrested development and Gary’s precociousness meet.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    There’s a sealed-off quality to The Souvenir Part II that the first installment doesn’t have, a sense of surrendering to the idea that it’s possible to authentically portray only oneself — which may be true and may be a creative dead end. But even that turns out to be by design, something both the film and its protagonist can acknowledge and then escape.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    It’s a romp, full of touches that go by almost too quickly to pick up on — I was partial to the strongman who plays a small but key role — but the lingering mood is unmistakably sad.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    In its glimpse into the lives of partnered-up fictional directors, Bergman Island invites its viewer to guess how much it’s a reflection of Hansen-Løve’s actual relationship, while also acknowledging the gap between the art someone makes and the person they are.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Washington manages the near-impossible feat of delivering his lines as though he’s putting the words together in the moment, speaking some of the most famous sentences in the English language as though they’re actually being dredged up out of Macbeth’s roiling consciousness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    Diana, with her glamorous gowns and her taste for fast food, may be forever too much and not enough, but Spencer is just right.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    Being the hero of the story has never looked so poisoned, and that alone is thrilling enough to hope Villeneuve gets to make part two of this impressively batshit venture.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    What makes The Card Counter so delicious, aside from the Mad Libs quality of the way it connects card playing and government-sanctioned torture, is that the movie undermines the Spartan swagger of William’s half-existence as often as it basks in it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    While a little sentimentality never hurt anyone, what stands out when revisiting CODA outside the festival bubble are the parts that feel unguided by formula, all of which have to do with the dynamics of the Rossi family.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Swan Song is a tremendously tender love letter to someone who survived so many of the slings and arrows that accompanied being an openly gay man in a small, conservative area.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Stillwater is the new movie from director Tom McCarthy, and it feels like one he’s spent his career preparing for — an enthralling, exasperating, and, above all else, ambitious affair that doesn’t soften or demand sympathy for its difficult main character but does insist on according him his full humanity.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Alison Willmore
    The Green Knight is about someone who keeps waiting for external forces to turn him into the gallant, heroic figure he believes he should be. But at the film’s heart is a lesson that’s as timeless as any legend — travel as far as you like, but you’ll never be able to leave yourself behind.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    Roadrunner may have been made too soon, and made with a misguided approach in mind, but in its closing moments, it manages a sudden magnificence in affirming that there’s no right way to mourn. Grief, in all of its ugly reality, is a part of life too, and there’s no tidying it up for the camera.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    Fear Street Part 1: 1994 is a nasty, effective slasher.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Alison Willmore
    The film is about the power of storytelling, and not in the cornball, self-congratulatory sense in which that phrase is normally deployed.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    To watch director Justin Lin, who returned for F9 and the two subsequent films that will close the series out, wind things back to the start is to feel blessed relief that this improbably good gearhead daddy-issues opera may very well stick its landing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Alison Willmore
    It feels like a fist that won’t close, its elements never intentionally coming together.

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