Caroline Siede

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For 49 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 77% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Caroline Siede's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 91 Bringing Up Baby
Lowest review score: 33 Life Itself
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 31 out of 49
  2. Negative: 1 out of 49
49 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Caroline Siede
    It’s possible to imagine a much more risk-taking movie than the one DuVall has made. But before a film can break the queer holiday rom-com mold, someone has to set it up first. And Happiest Season is a welcome starting point.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    Like so much of Netflix’s quantity over quality output, Holidate is broad, unsubtle, and seemingly designed to be half-watched, phone in hand. Yet within that framework, it finds a unique comedic spark that keeps it zipping along.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 50 Caroline Siede
    After We Collided is too invested in its central couple to know what to do with its new romantic rival. Which is a shame because Sprouse turns in one of the film’s livelier performances.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Caroline Siede
    For a film about heartbreak, The Broken Hearts Gallery is a bit too glossy for its own good.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Caroline Siede
    Even for those outside of the Disney musical demographic, Howard is a moving portrait of an artist taken too soon during an era tragically marked by those kind of losses.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Caroline Siede
    In broadening the world of the first film without really deepening it, The Kissing Booth 2 often feels more like a spinoff TV series—although at an unconscionable 132 minutes long, it’s hardly a breezy watch.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    Like Miranda himself, We Are Freestyle Love Supreme has an exuberant theater-kid earnestness that will either prove endearing or grating depending on how you feel about backstage warm-up games and spontaneous sidewalk performances.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    Although The Half Of It mostly sticks to what’s swiftly becoming the Netflix teen rom-com house style (moody amber lighting, Wes Anderson-inspired framing, and nostalgia for John Hughes’ oeuvre), Wu creates several compellingly original images as well.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Caroline Siede
    The film’s desire to lampoon its rom-com cake and eat it too leaves it on an uncomfortable middle ground; a third act shift toward emotional earnestness doesn’t land, because the main players possess no depth.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    A debauched but heartfelt coming-of-age story about impressionable teenage boys and the imperfect male role models who influence them. Davidson’s most important skill is his ability to share the spotlight and create real chemistry with his co-stars.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Caroline Siede
    Anchoring it all is horror darling Anya Taylor-Joy, who makes for a particularly icy Emma.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    Across just a handful of scenes, [Rob] Morgan emerges as the soul of the film. It’s a testament to how much the right actor can do with even the briefest screentime—and a call to give Morgan a starring role worthy of him.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    A pleasant distraction without a lot of payoff. It doesn’t tarnish the original, but it never quite rises to its heights either.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 58 Caroline Siede
    While a lot of modern kids’ movies (especially those based on toys or apps) feel crass and cheap, Playmobil is heartfelt and earnest. It doesn’t have much to offer childfree moviegoers, and it does mostly feel like The Lego Movie with the serial numbers filed off. But it’s the sort of film that will keep kids entertained without driving their parents crazy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Caroline Siede
    Watching the remake over-explain every joke and dramatic beat only increases one’s appreciation for how the original trusted its young audience to understand subtext, satire, and emotional nuance.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 71 Caroline Siede
    Even if The Current War is soft around the edges and a little soggy in the middle, there’s still something appreciably sparky at its core. As overstuffed and frenetic as the film is, in its best moments, The Current War manages to make an everyday utility seem just as magical as it did 120 years ago.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 76 Caroline Siede
    After a run of live-action Disney remakes that mostly play things safe, Maleficent: Mistress of Evil is a much needed swing-for-the-fences dose of originality. It doesn’t always hit it out of the park, but it’s wickedly fun to watch it try.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    The big-screen version of Downton Abbey is still engaging, well-dressed comfort food. It just doesn’t quite feel like a full meal.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    It’s an intriguing idea that results in a painfully by-the-books biopic. That being said, a gusty, heartbreaking turn from Renée Zellweger makes the exercise worth sitting through.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 58 Caroline Siede
    Brittany Runs A Marathon winds up feeling like a story told by an outsider who’s empathetic toward, but not fully immersed in, a specific lived experience.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Caroline Siede
    A cheerful, cheesy coming-of-age story that evokes the earnest films of the era in which it’s set, Blinded By The Light is not one for the schmaltz-averse. Yet as with Chadha’s "Bend It Like Beckham" and "Bride & Prejudice," there’s some appreciably meaty stuff beneath its toe-tapping, crowd-pleasing surface.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Caroline Siede
    The Art Of Racing In The Rain will play well for those who consider their pets to be full-fledged family members, but otherwise this dog’s journey lacks a purpose or any sense of artistry.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Caroline Siede
    Aladdin could wind up working well for young audiences yet again. For everyone else, however, it’s a bland copy of a lush original. It has the same themes and characters, but without the heart or nuance, despite being 38 minutes longer.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Caroline Siede
    Although the big-screen adaptation of Nicola Yoon’s best-selling young adult novel finds welcome specificity in its world and character building, it never rises above the most generic of platitudes in its central teen love story.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Caroline Siede
    While The Hustle is more overt when it comes to discussing gender, including a monologue about why women are better suited to “the con” than men, it doesn’t really have all that much to say. Not about gender, not about con artistry, and definitely not about how to craft a satisfying studio comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    To make a great romantic comedy, you need a few key components. Stylish direction. Winning lead actors. Likable, lived-in characters. And some kind of unique angle on the well-trod genre at hand. Someone Great offers all of that and more, but it also proves that one of the most important and least appreciated aspects of a successful rom-com is a great script.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    In a film seemingly aimed more at teens than adults, Minghella effectively updates that familiar star-is-born template for an arthouse-minded Instagram generation.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 42 Caroline Siede
    The real problem with After is that it’s a lifeless slog of thinly written clichés, one that’s missing the charismatic spark of the actual One Direction boys.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Caroline Siede
    Its characters are thinly written, its antagonist is one-note, and its clumsy third-act action climax is wholly perfunctory. Yet despite all that, Dumbo still manages to offer the sweeping old-fashioned magic of an earnest family blockbuster.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Caroline Siede
    Unfortunately, welcome insight into the physical and emotional experience of living with cystic fibrosis eventually gives way to increasingly improbable romantic and dramatic scenarios...By its third act, the film almost starts to feel like a parody of the most maudlin conventions of the “sick teen romance” genre.

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