Christopher Machell

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For 128 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Christopher Machell's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 The Grand Bizarre
Lowest review score: 20 Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 78 out of 128
  2. Negative: 2 out of 128
128 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Christopher Machell
    A stylish and fitfully engaging crime thriller with a great concept, let down by incoherent plotting and impenetrable characterisation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    Quietly raging, The Assistant is a bleakly precise study of complicity in workplace abuse.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Christopher Machell
    While Binoche is reliably magnetic and the fitfully pretty visuals match a ripped-from-the-headlines script, Who You Think I Am’s pot never quite comes to the boil.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Christopher Machell
    For fans of Mack’s juxtapositions of natural and synthetic imagery and of her fascination with repetition and patterns, The Grand Bizarre is surely the artist’s most accomplished work.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Christopher Machell
    Aside from the film’s more immediate pleasures, what is perhaps most intriguing about Why Don’t You Just Die! is Sokolov’s almost visible attempt to find his own voice: among this melange of film-school influences, it’s undoubtedly there, though perhaps it hasn’t quite formed yet.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Christopher Machell
    Sea Fever proves better in concept than in execution, let down by a second act of fumbled editing and slackened tension.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    A visceral, Atwoodian journey, The Other Lamb is as much an examination of narcissism and the existing structures of gendered power as it is of the limits of faith.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Christopher Machell
    Fire Will Come is of an enigmatic and poetic cinema, borne of fierce, barely-contained vision.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Christopher Machell
    A work of astonishing aesthetic beauty, made up of static compositions and use of chiaroscuro that recalls the Dutch masters.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    By situating the film in the context of domestic abuse, Whannel avoids cliché by evoking the way that distressed women are routinely treated as irrational and disreputable – a theme carried through to the film’s inspired conclusion.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    Read as a loose adaptation of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Little Joe is a gripping and visually striking satire of essentialist maternal instinct and the contemporary anxiety of wellbeing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Christopher Machell
    This version of Emma. is unlikely to win any accolades for invention. Indeed the 1996 film Clueless arguably remains the most exciting version of Austen’s novel. Nevertheless, de Wilde’s version is a confident and lively translation of Austen’s wit on to the screen.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    One of Birds of Prey’s great pleasures is that it tells a Gotham story without having to tell the Gotham story: the adventures of Harley Quinn and associates are not at the centre of some grand narrative, and they are all the better for it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    Queen & Slim is consciously political – powerfully so – but it is simple human survival that drives the two protagonists.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    To the Ends of the Earth is a light, airy and fun journey with flashes of poetry.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 Christopher Machell
    The Rise of Skywalker offers us nothing but toadying supplication to the worst aspects of fan culture. There is no story to tell here, no characters to care about, no ideas to explore. The film is pure construct, a box built for its own sake, at long last opened with excruciating listlessness, revealing nothing but its own vapid emptiness.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    In all this, there is an implicit if undeveloped criticism of the way that power and capital are so often the spoils of posturing masculine insecurity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    The Cave is a raw, urgent film about one of the great humanitarian crimes of our times, made all the starker for the utter lack of a global response.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Christopher Machell
    With The Irishman, Scorsese offers us his first truly autumnal film – a picture about age’s slow, inevitable decline. There are the signature dolly shots, the period pop music, the bursts of brutality, but there is also a frail melancholy we have rarely glimpsed in even his statelier films.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Christopher Machell
    In giving rope to Bannon and hoping that he’ll hang himself, we’re instead forced to watch him fashion a lasso and play at being John Wayne, with Morris seemingly powerless to stop him.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Christopher Machell
    Memory certainly makes a good go of it, weaving together industrial production history with its mythic, pulp and artistic inspirations. The disparate strands of Alien’s origins have never quite been connected like this in a popular documentary, but billing this as the “untold story” of Scott’s film is a bit of a stretch.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Christopher Machell
    Subsumed by the bigger picture, the plot resurfaces at the end to utterly devastating effect. Only a film with the epic sweep of So Long, My Son could pull off such a narrative feat so beautifully.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    Saint Maud is the dive into obsession, isolation and urban deprivation that you need right now.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Christopher Machell
    From five years-worth of footage, al-Kateab constructs a narrative of astonishing humanity, clarity and urgency, capturing a global outrage from the perspective of the human and individual.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    As both director and performer, Waititi is on top form.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Christopher Machell
    This is pop-punk filmmaking – vibrant, disposable, and shallow. Still, it’s difficult to care about the nutritional content of your confectionary when it tastes this sweet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    The Temple’s antics are a hilarious middle finger to the establishment, while, their stand against hypocrisy and the Evangelical Right’s blatantly theocratic mission to take control of the levers of power feels vital.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Christopher Machell
    If there is any real complaint to be levelled at Color Out of Space, it’s that it has more ideas than it knows what to do with.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Christopher Machell
    Despite its lunkish, ludicrous – and frankly cynical – qualities, this entry retains much of the appeal of previous entries.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Christopher Machell
    A Jarmusch joint through and through, The Dead Don’t Die is as charming, affected and perplexing as we’ve come to expect from the long-time darling of US indie cinema.

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