Daphne Howland

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For 88 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Daphne Howland's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 90 Small Small Thing
Lowest review score: 20 Love is Tolerance - Tolerance is Love
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 55 out of 88
  2. Negative: 5 out of 88
88 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Daphne Howland
    Director Derek Doneen opens hearts wide with his documentary The Price of Free, his tale of enslaved children working in factories in India. But he’ll also crush many of those hearts with the revelation that viewers are among the villains activist Kailash Satyarthi is fighting.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Daphne Howland
    There’s still charm in Charm City, despite it all.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Daphne Howland
    We’re privy to the students’ backgrounds and get a tiny glimpse into their futures, but the film skims a lot in favor of showcasing the ISEF gathering. Still, as in the spelling-bee doc, these are moving stories of nerdy children, kids who are pragmatic about the forward march of industry yet believe societies can, and must, find cleaner ways to advance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Daphne Howland
    The doc never goes much deeper than the information and arguments on AI that can currently be found in the Sunday papers.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Daphne Howland
    Love and tolerance are difficult to argue with, yet this effort seems pointless — not just because it will change few minds, but also because it’s a mess.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Daphne Howland
    It’s a painstaking inspection of parenthood, which is fraught even in less formidable circumstances than what these families face, and often harrowing. But it’s also a contemplation of what it means to be human and, ultimately, optimistic.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Daphne Howland
    Sometimes a filmmaker is so taken with a subject that a documentary fizzles into hagiography, a problem of Jeremy Frindel’s The Doctor From India, a film about Vasant Lad, who brought the ancient Indian healing practice of Ayurveda to the U.S. in the late 1970s.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Daphne Howland
    Much of the film is beautiful — hot springs, the ocean’s depths, and deep space are photogenic — although Cheney preserves a few too many mundane “hello, how do you do”s, and the science isn’t deeply explained.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Daphne Howland
    Full of such bon mots, the documentary is the epitome of positive thinking, perhaps the closest thing America has to a state religion. Still, like social worker Wendy Lustbader’s book What’s Worth Knowing, which took a similar tack years ago, it’s an opportunity to connect with souls who’ve been around more than a few blocks.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Daphne Howland
    It’s a painfully familiar story in the era of #MeToo and the Catholic Church’s abuse scandal, with the added agony that parents, teachers, and school officials were, to varying degrees, complicit.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Daphne Howland
    Pilgrimages have potential: Geoffrey Chaucer gave us 24 good yarns in his Canterbury Tales. But there isn’t even one in the otherwise gorgeous documentary Strangers on the Earth.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Daphne Howland
    It’s a brutal takedown of a practice now warping K-12 education and should embarrass every school that still requires them.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Daphne Howland
    The Judge is packed tight; it’s enlightening and suspenseful and paced for maximum enjoyment. In the end, it’s not just about Kholoud Al-Faqih, but you’ll be very glad to have met her.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Daphne Howland
    If Catena has flaws, filmmaker Kenneth Carlson declines to feature them, perhaps because they’ve been friends since their Brown University days thirty years ago. Still, the doctor has earned the adulation, and a visit to a leper colony shows why.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Daphne Howland
    It’s quite a story, one that, like all good stories, turns out to have meaning for anyone.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Daphne Howland
    Directors Harris and Sanin provide clear historical and present-day context and furnish alarming proof of Vladimir Putin’s multilayered deceptions.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Daphne Howland
    In an era when the propaganda machines of conflicts like Syria are imperiling photojournalists’ work all the more, Campbell’s homage to his friend is a thorough look at a straight shooter.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Daphne Howland
    James Demo’s The Peacemaker is an intense, intimate portrait of a visionary capable of sophisticated analysis, abrupt anger, self-deprecating wit, and profound insights — all while existing at considerable remove from his fellow man.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Daphne Howland
    The film is a jumble, with no sense of meaningful interaction.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Daphne Howland
    The film is a haunting, damning unpacking of history that also reminds us how little progress we’ve made.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Daphne Howland
    Denison keeps up the pace — those television skills coming in handy — and unpacks a lot. But he also allows in some light. There are plenty of Las Vegas police officers who want things to change, and Denison gives them, and the victims’ families, a voice.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Daphne Howland
    It’s hard to know whether it’s intentional that The New Radical, Adam Bhala Lough’s slick documentary about “techno-anarchist” Cody Wilson, famous for developing a 3-D-printable plastic gun, presents its subject as a shallow pseudo-intellectual man-child.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Daphne Howland
    Cristina Herrera Borquez’s elegant documentary No Dresscode Required is a masterful, layered story of commissar-crossed lovers.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Daphne Howland
    Take My Nose…Please! rescues plastic surgery from Hollywood’s “did they or didn’t they?” gossip and reality television’s odious voyeurism with a nuanced, empathetic (and often funny) introduction to a few women, mostly comedians, who’ve had work done or are considering it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Daphne Howland
    Boston, Jon Dunham’s film about that city’s marathon, is a contender — an emotional comeback story, interspersed with thrilling moments in its history, without gloss, cliche or even nostalgia.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Daphne Howland
    The short-subject treatment serves as a challenge that, in eighty minutes, writer-director Matthew Weiss doesn’t meet.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Daphne Howland
    It’s a compelling look at a valuable contraption that’s slipping through our grasp, and will send many viewers to flea markets and eBay for one of their own.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Daphne Howland
    Shen overplays his hand.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Daphne Howland
    Celebrity testimonials drown out the scientists, and Galinsky’s haphazard exploration of his own back pain is a major distraction.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Daphne Howland
    The doc is thorough.

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