For 302 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

David Sims' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 First Cow
Lowest review score: 10 Dolittle
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 32 out of 302
302 movie reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 95 David Sims
    The film’s long running time doesn’t feel indulgent at all, but electrifyingly necessary, the only way to draw out the restrained sorrows of its insular ensemble. Few filmmakers can make simple conversation a blockbuster moment, but in Hamaguchi’s hands, the audience is hanging on every character’s next word.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    As a jolting piece of entertainment, Scream absolutely succeeds. It can’t reach the terrifying heights of Craven’s original, but none of the sequels could; each one always leaned a little more on meta-humor as the series went along.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    The sparseness of the script matches the modesty of the staging. Because the film lacks lush period detail, or really any specific background visuals at all, the audience’s attention is thrown onto the performances, and the cast rises to the occasion magnificently.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 55 David Sims
    The acting is good, while the story fails to really hang together. The same is true for a lot of Clooney projects—perhaps unsurprisingly, he’s attentive to the subtleties of an actor’s performance, but the scripts he’s chosen of late have been short on narrative propulsion.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    The satire of Don’t Look Up is anguished and clear to the point of feeling bludgeoning.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 65 David Sims
    Nightmare Alley is quite handsomely mounted and thematically resonant material for del Toro, but for a thriller to connect, it needs to deliver some real thrills along the way.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 95 David Sims
    Wachowski’s gamble is that viewers will enjoy a film that’s heavy on philosophizing and introspection as long as it retains the emotional, romantic hook that powered the first movie. Reeves and Moss sell their reunion as Neo and Trinity persuasively, glowing with the overwhelming chemistry and affection that Wachowski needed to push the film beyond cynicism.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 95 David Sims
    Spielberg’s West Side Story is a charismatic showcase for everything he does best on the big screen, and a genuinely thoughtful update, making gentle and incisive rearrangements to justify its brassy sashay back into cinemas.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 55 David Sims
    Spider-Man: No Way Home unfolds as though it were written by a room full of children who had just eaten a whole bag of sugar; it’s a hectic series of plot twists and deus ex machinas that overturns an entire bucket of action figures and smashes them all together with delight. The film might be a new nadir of cinema—but it’s also an undeniably watchable good time.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 David Sims
    Mikey is one of Baker’s most thought-through creations, and Rex brings him to life with terrifying honesty.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 95 David Sims
    Campion never takes a side in the ongoing conflict between George and Phil, instead brilliantly capturing the purpose, and the futility, in each brother’s approach, making The Power of the Dog an inimitable viewing experience.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 95 David Sims
    Licorice Pizza is an antic comedy about Alana and Gary tooling around the Valley, but it’s also a bittersweet reminiscence about how difficult embracing adulthood can be.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 David Sims
    With Tick, Tick … Boom, Miranda celebrates the power and the pressure of the world he loves most, and he’s picked a subject who encapsulates those warring dynamics perfectly.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    Despite the over-the-top performances and plot twists he juggles, Scott drives his ultimate message home—that wealth is tempting yet poisonous.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    It’s a sweet and engaging movie, but one that sacrifices some profundity in order to faithfully capture the world through a boy’s eyes.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 15 David Sims
    Ghostbusters: Afterlife is derivative but not unwatchable—until the horrible last act.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 65 David Sims
    Anytime King Richard threatens to follow an anodyne sports-movie arc, Williams’s forceful personality rears its head again.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 10 David Sims
    Red Notice is a glossy but empty product that indicates the extent of the genre’s current crisis.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    It’s a specific character study told with the ambition that small, arty projects are rarely afforded—a complex and deeply realized story that not only demanded a second film but actually got one.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 David Sims
    Coupled with Stewart’s exposed nerve of a performance, the suffocating intensity of Larraín’s filmmaking, and Jonny Greenwood’s droning score, the movie brings a fresh sense of tragedy and loss to a tale that might otherwise feel familiar.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    It moves quickly but exhaustingly; if you’re tired of one trope, there’s always a new one waiting excitedly around the corner.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    While Wright remains exceptionally gifted at mashing up genres to create moments of real cinematic lightning, by and large, Last Night in Soho is all flash, no impact.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 David Sims
    Ferguson is the star of the show, imperious one moment and fragile the next, torn between nurturing her son’s purpose and protecting him from becoming a monster.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    Scott has long made movies about how systems of power exist to serve only the powerful, from the faceless corporations of Alien to the indifferent cops of Thelma and Louise. As The Last Duel rumbles to its bloody conclusion and its two leading men clash, it’s clear that the filmmaker’s allegiance lies elsewhere.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 David Sims
    Ducournau challenges viewers to find the humanity in a character who seems intent on rejecting her own, all while provoking as many laughs as gasps.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 David Sims
    It’s ambitious, sprawling, and sometimes shockingly counter to tradition for the series. But it’s also hugely effective: In offering real closure for the first time, No Time to Die sheds Bond’s mystique. It cements Craig’s legacy of playing Bond not just as a reliable institution, but also as a flawed human.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 David Sims
    A number of the observations about the strictures of gangland life that The Many Saints of Newark bumps up against are compelling, but the film is a victim of its own compression, telling a season’s worth of stories in two hours.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 45 David Sims
    Venom may not have realized it was a so-bad-it’s-good cult classic, but Let There Be Carnage is striving to maintain that status from minute one.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 David Sims
    Almost everything imaginable has gone wrong on the journey from stage to screen, and the result is a film that isn’t even “so bad it’s good,” like some other recent musical movies; mostly, it’s just painful to watch.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 David Sims
    Watching the bureaucracy shift from a source of frustration to comfort gives the film its arresting tension.

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