Diego Semerene

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For 253 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Diego Semerene's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Mr. Bachmann and His Class
Lowest review score: 0 A Warrior's Heart
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 93 out of 253
253 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    François Ozon’s paean to nostalgia wraps tragedy and obsession in a whimsical bow.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    The film’s tendency to over-explain, over-intellectualize, and over-script events leaves little room for spontaneity and doubt.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    While Ulrike Ottinger accesses the most consequential of decades through nostalgia, she does so with humility.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    The documentary exists within the very restricted pantheon of films that successfully reap the cinematic potential of pedagogy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    If the world outside the Supermercado Veran is rife with poverty and crime, we wouldn’t know it from inside this little cocoon.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Lili Horvát’s film delights in wallowing in ambiguity, contradiction, and doubt.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The film is at its most moving when it lingers on the face of children who are impotent to return to the world they used to call home.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    When the distance between uncle and niece shortens, Uncle Frank ceases to be a tender portrait of outsider kinship and transforms into a histrionic road movie with screwball intentions.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film reminds us that without investigative reporting there’s no democracy, and that traditional expectations around impartiality and objectivity may be untenable in the face of horror.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Dating Amber rather seamlessly strips itself of its hyperbolic affectations to reveal a heartbreaking story of emancipation through friendship.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Heidi Ewing’s tale of immigration and deportation afflicting the lives of a Mexican gay couple flashes its reason for being at every turn.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Reiner Holzemer’s adulation of his subject feels most credible because he spends a lot of time focusing on the clothes.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Redolent of Claude Lanzmann’s approach, Mehrdad Oskouei strips his images to their barest bones as his subjects openly speak about their traumas, as if trying to avoid aestheticizing their pain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Václav Marhoul’s film is at its most magnificent when it lingers on the poetry of its images.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    We are never quite sure of the extent to which situations and dialogues have been scripted and, as such, it’s as though Herzog were more witness than author, more passerby than gawker, simply registering Japan being Japan.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Throughout the film, it’s as if mundane objects hold the remedies for the wretchedness of everyday life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Christophe Honoré deposits all his chips on the comedic premise at the expense of character study and gravitas.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    David France’s most remarkable accomplishment emerges from an aesthetic commitment of a very particular kind.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film grapples with the various shapes that guilt and honor (or lack thereof) might take in a context of state-sanctioned death.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Reciprocity might be impossible in a world rigged against queerness, Tsai seems to say, which doesn’t mean that certain things can't still be shared.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Semerene
    The film is an unending source for the worst possible clichés and most overdone series of graphic matches in the history of film editing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Camera, character, and cameraperson are one throughout, and the effect is exquisitely suffocating.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Philippe Garrel illustrates the absurdity behind the myth of the complementary couple with the same cynicism that permeates his previous work but none of the humor or wit.
    • Slant Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    Li Cheng gets much closer to capturing his characters’ predicaments when he trusts the images alone.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    With Earth, Nikolaus Geyrhalter’s visual strategy is to wow us with tangibility and data, though he doesn’t give up aesthetic experimentation altogether in this survey of Anthropocene calamities.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Only rarely does Karim Aïnouz allow for loopholes to refreshingly emerge from the film’s stylistic deadlock.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The simplicity of bodies barely moving before a camera that brings their quotidian temporality into a halt is nothing short of a radical proposition in our digital era.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    It’s fascinating to see Benedetta Barzini in academic action, like an ethnographer of the patriarchy herself, bringing back news from its most glamourous yet rotten core.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    Only Marisa Tomei’s face can compete with Isabelle Huppert’s ability to turn even the sappiest of scenarios into a nuanced tour de force.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Erin Derham’s unadventurous aesthetic inoculates her from taxidermy’s subversive spirit.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    The film’s mid-act about-face lends a refreshing sense of complexity to an otherwise superficial depiction of Wrinkles.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The film is much more in synchrony with the haziness of its imagery when it preserves the awkwardness between characters, the impossibility for anything other than life’s basic staples to be exchanged.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Justine Triet is less committed to some make-believe realism than she is to the tricks that memory and language can play on us.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Hari Sama never quite manages to seamlessly sync the film’s anti-bourgeois political commitments to its soap-operatic register.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    It wouldn’t be fair to call the film hagiographic, but the director’s empathy, if not love, for her subject hinders her from examining Cassandro’s wounds with much depth.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    We never spend enough time with the characters to believe the urgency, and lushness, of their cravings.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Almudena Carracedo and Robert Bahar’s documentary is monumental for its clamorous sounding of an alarm.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    The film is a tale about how those who spiral so far out of control become blind, if not immune, to the severity of their symptoms.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Lila Avilés’s film reserves the possibility of flirtations with disaster to turn into acts of emancipation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Claire Simon knows that the best way to capture the anxiousness of a moment is to leave it unembellished.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Unlike My Life in Pink, Daughter of Mine sidesteps all ambiguity, as the film reveals everything about its characters straight away, leaving little room for unexpected complexities about their predicaments to develop.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Zain Al Rafeea's naturalness, however uncanny, only makes the film's maneuverings seem all the more obvious.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Director and co-writer Milad Alami's film feels like several fused-together trial drafts of the same narrative.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    El Angel‘s greatest accomplishment is in the way it charges the relationships between characters with so much eroticism but never grants us the right to watch desire — other than desire for violence — actually unfold.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film exposes the idea of places as metaphors, mirrors, and symptoms for the people who inhabit them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    Adrian is too flat as a character, his plight too generic, for his tears to count as something other than a sentimental ready-made.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    The Children Act stages the clumsiness of belated domestic confrontations with the very coldness that’s kept its characters from having discussed their emotions for decades and from having had sex for almost a year.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Despite the exuberance of the works featured, which are promptly flattened by the film's commitment to a traditional documentary blueprint, Yayoi Kusama's resilience still commands our attention.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Much more interesting than Jacques and Arthur's relationship is Christophe Honoré's subtle portrait of the early '90s as a time of accelerated mortality and mourning, but also of material encounters of all kinds.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Glenn Close's perennial look of astonishment and resilience commands the action to the point of turning every other screen element into a gratuitous prop.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    The film's refusal to produce a campy critique feels more like the product of lack of imagination than a purposeful repudiation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    The film is a rebellion of surfaces that never quite reaches, or emanates from, the underpinning roots of its fable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    The very act of having kids and demanding perfect conformity from them is never questioned by the film.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    As Ian Bonhôte's documentary reveals, Alexander McQueen's suicide was perhaps the all-too-predictable ending to a history of violence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    The sexual outbursts in the film are tempered with a tenderness that one hardly associates with Bruce LaBruce's career.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Rüdiger Suchsland’s film is a master class in the relationship between image production and ideology writ large.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    With a tender and respectful gaze, 12 DAYS (@distribfilmsus) sheds light on the relationship between the French state and the mentally ill.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Huppert is such a master of her craft that even the silliest sequences give way to tour-de-force moments.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Rainer Sarnet is as invested in telling a convoluted story that feels rooted in millennia-old folklore as he is in unabashedly experimenting with form and style for the sake of visual pleasure alone.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    The film is full of astute, and poetically staged, critiques of the parallel worlds resulting from Iran's police state.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Although João Moreira Salles tries to tap into the pleasurable elements inherent to the essayistic as a cinematic form, such as making the merging of intimate and social reality poetically visible, his storylines never quite gel.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    First the film inhabits the eye of a storm—which is to say, the storm of Italy’s wretched peripheries—before submitting to the more ersatz cinematic will of filling Pio’s life with beginnings, middles, and ends.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Writer-director Damon Cardasis follows a rather didactic approach to his 14-year-old's protagonist's plight in Saturday Church.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    Lost, or at least merely glossed over, throughout this hagiographic documentary portrait is the miraculous story of an effeminate Brazilian boy who was actually allowed to blossom through dance and who, because of such permission, has managed to survive his queer childhood a little more unscathed.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    Childhood in Peter Lataster and Petra Lataster-Czisch's documentary is the terrain of contradiction and ambiguity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Cross-dressing in the story is merely a tool for survival, but such border-crossing is inevitably rife with unintended consequences beyond narrative ones.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    The film is an interminable saga full of soap-operatic plot twists involving quickly broken marriages, sexual assault, a secret porn career, terminal illness, and a quasi lesbian love affair.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    If the global reunion that the cruise ship presents here is such a panacea, why is there so much moping?
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Writer-director Francis Lee captures not only what masculinity does and how it comes undone, but the complex apparatus that keeps it into place: the family’s surveillance, the silence, the shame.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    It begins as a clever pseudo-mumblecore provocation with shades of Bruce LaBruce only to quickly turn into indefensible nonsense.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    Michael Roberts's documentary is an unabashed exercise in deifying its subject matter with superlatives and hyperbole from the mouths of talking heads, which ultimately results in the cheapening of the artist.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    School Life is unfortunately committed to keeping its subjects, especially Headfort’s students, at arm’s length.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    There's a Tarkovskian layer of social despair in the web of corruption joining the child and the adult, the bedroom and the nation.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    Anita Rocha da Silveira’s slasher-film plot is simply a tease, as there are no scares here, and the filmmaker’s attempt at genre hybridization never coheres conceptually.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    The film too often puts too much trust in dialogue, as Marie and Boris's predicament is sometimes perfectly conveyed by the actors' facial expressions and body language.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    There’s something liberating about such a steady creative hand that rejects justifying the twists and turns of a storyline, which becomes in 4 Days in France something akin to cruising itself.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    The film eventually replaces the captivating smallness of everyday life with an inconsequential drama.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    If not for its performances, the film would belong in the category of Hallmark Channel tearjerkers.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Here the organic and the frivolously material aren't oppositions or rivals, but partners in a spectacle for men's eyes only.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 12 Diego Semerene
    If there’s anything worth mulling over about The Drowning, it's the way it proffers the East Coast couple as an inevitably miserable institution without really meaning to.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Semerene
    The film is essentially an exercise in forcing a female genius back into her proper place of dependence on both the father figure and the Prince Charming.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 12 Diego Semerene
    Ritesh Batra's film is a tale of white nostalgia that should have found its footing on dramatic grounds.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    When compared to the high-stakes dramas at the center of Paris Is Burning, where sex workers dreamed of becoming supermodels, Kiki feels rather tame.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Diego Semerene
    Like most great essay films, Paraguay Remembered is driven by associations not just with art works with which it shares a kinship, but a stream-of-conscious relationship between word and image.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Diego Semerene
    Agnieszka Smoczynska's film is most poignant when it simply stares at its own strangeness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 12 Diego Semerene
    Justin Kelly's film is more interested in rushing through the narrative's events than contemplating their environment.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Very few films accept the contradicting velocities of gay desire, and present them in such blunt yet graceful fashion, the way Paris 05:59 does.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Diego Semerene
    The filmmakers and performers show great maturity in refusing to settle scores or spill secrets.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe's documentary raises important questions about the limits of pedagogy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    At first, the film’s dark humor is amusing, only for it to wear off once an actual plot kicks into motion.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Diego Semerene
    What the film embodies, unfortunately, the listlessness of its slacker characters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Diego Semerene
    Its fatal mistake is to make up for blindness, instead of embracing it as something other than a liability.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Semerene
    Writer-director Tim Kirkman tries to peg depth of character on the character of Dean instead of having him earn it.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 0 Diego Semerene
    It’s difficult to find a reason for the film's existence beyond a spoiled platform for James Franco's ersatz boldness.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 12 Diego Semerene
    Glenn Close's face teems with a flawlessly controlled gravitas that’s completely at odds with the film’s ordinariness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    André Téchiné does justice to the closeness between repulsion and desire, difference and sameness, heterosexuality and homosexuality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Diego Semerene
    From the overtly vibrant colors to the caricaturesque dimensions of the performances, the film's aesthetic promises a great allegorical message that never arrives.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Diego Semerene
    In the logic of the film, for the camera to move at all would feel like a betrayal of its contemplative hunger.

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