Farran Smith Nehme

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For 325 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Phoenix
Lowest review score: 0 No One Lives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 49 out of 325
325 movie reviews
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Despite Franco’s laudable desire to shake up a stodgy genre, his film could have done with more life, and less art.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 25 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie sneers at the journalists covering the trial, but for those of us who followed it at the time, the newspaper accounts were a lot more engrossing than this film.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Beat by beat, it’s exactly what you’d expect, right down to the camera’s prurient interest in the dewy flesh of Stefanie Scott as the 17-year-old daughter.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Archival footage is combined with somewhat affected-looking re-enactments, but the film achieves its purpose: to remind us that we still have thousands of bombs, and neither they — nor we — have gotten that much smarter.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The result — directed by Rufus Norris and setting words collected by Alecky Blythe against music by Adam Cork — is mesmerizing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film can be rough going for those who know little of Berger’s work. That’s especially true of the second part, a stupefying collage about Berger’s home in rural Quincy, France.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    While clearly on the side of the protesters, the filmmakers are still determined to explain every legal detail, and at times matters become bogged down in endless televised journalists and snappish legislators.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie’s strength is, surprisingly, the narration, spoken with gentle gravity by Moni Moshonov.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The first half has erratic pacing, but past the midpoint the film roars into action. Dornan is monotonous, but Murphy is intense enough for them both; side romances for the men feel phony but apparently are based in fact.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Making elegant use of the austere landscape and the rugged features of star Jérémie Renier, the film shows how these doggedly practical and nonspiritual men cope with the eerie events, the cause of which is hinted at but never fully explained.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Much time is spent on inter-museum wrangling, and the personalities aren’t vivid enough (as they were in “The New Rijksmuseum”) to build tension. The interest lies in the close look at the strange vision of this great artist.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It’s an ambitious, often arresting film, but it lacks cohesion, and the seesawing plot and motivations seem more indecisive than mysterious.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Frank’s work is phenomenal, but his longtime editor and collaborator Laura Israel seems determined during the course of her documentary never to give you a moment long enough to contemplate it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Hollywood has been yukking it up over North Korea and its comical-looking leader for some years now. There’s nothing funny about either, and Mansky shows why.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The actors bring emotional authenticity to the aftermath of trauma, but despite that and the handsome cinematography, there is also a persistent phoniness.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    You may or may not connect Brinkley to a certain presidential candidate, but, either way, this is one of the most entertaining documentaries to come along in some time.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    This loopy absurdist comedy is the final work of Andrzej Zulawski, the famed Polish filmmaker who died in February.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Pace and mood are equally glum, and so much information is withheld that the twisty relationship can’t build much tension.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Solomon and Genovese remind us that all witnesses can be unreliable, in one way or another. The emotional impact comes from the gentle way the film reveals Kitty Genovese as a loving, vibrant person, and not as a symbol.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is impeccably shot and paced, but the radical real-world implications of Wise’s agenda are never fully explored.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Kaili Blues has the kitchen-sink feel of a new director eager to try every art-film technique in the book, but the film’s beauty and inventiveness are riveting.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    It is engrossing, even funny at times, but it is a bit too jagged in execution to properly build to its tragic climax.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    The sharpest, least sentimental and possibly the best version of Austen yet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The remarkable performances from the central trio are what carries the film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Blair has a colorless, weirdly teenage delivery that doesn’t convey Hesse’s vivid, brilliant personality. It is odd to watch a documentary where the subject becomes more interesting when she is discussed by other people.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The movie was always going to be a record of another unique New York institution, making way for another glass box.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    French director Stéphane Brizé films in lingering takes, with Lindon in almost every shot, and the actor is wonderful, able to convey Thierry’s conflict even when his back is to the camera.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film works to rescue Arendt and her phrase “the banality of evil” from years of cliché, and largely succeeds.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Most of the film, while handsome to look at, doesn’t rise above this level of obviousness.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Swift, confident, and exceptionally nasty, this Argentine film bears roughly the same relationship to the Martin Scorsese of “Goodfellas” that Brian De Palma does to, well, all of Hitchcock.

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