Farran Smith Nehme

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For 325 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Farran Smith Nehme's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Caesar Must Die
Lowest review score: 0 Sirius
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 49 out of 325
325 movie reviews
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Hossein Amini’s script leaves good actors like John Cusack, Ken Watanabe and Chow Yun-Fat flailing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    The real thrills consist of one monologue brilliantly delivered by Manuel Tadros as a bar owner, and most of Gabriel Yared’s old-school orchestral score.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The result is quite a ramble: Leacock talks about how equipment influences filmmaking, the making of a custard and the wanderings of his cat. Through it all, happily, his company is a pleasure.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Gibran’s book was huge in the 1960s, and it feels fresher here than it has in ages, although the visuals are stronger than the music.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Israeli director Nadav Lapid uses a well-worn concept — a lonely little boy is taken under a teacher’s wing — to create a slow, creepy movie.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    More than a thriller, Phoenix is a ghost story, made plain in an extraordinary shot of Nelly’s terror at a passing train.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    “The past is past. I don’t want to remember . . . the wound is healed,” says Kemat, an Indonesian man who survived the massacre of more than 10,000 people at the Snake River in 1965. As this documentary shows, nothing could be further from the truth.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Tamhane’s quiet techniques build to pure, cold fury.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    There are no surprises, but for once there’s a set of artsy millennial characters who feel like real humans, and Berlin looks great.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    As lovely as Jimmy’s Hall is, Paul Laverty’s script is not so much talky as speech-y. Some conversations play like bullet points about Irish politics and the iron grip of the Catholic Church.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    What a trippy delight it is.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Sex comedies work best with light touch, and as the ponderous title (a literal translation of the French term for orgasm) indicates, Australian writer-director Josh Lawson mostly doesn’t have it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The swooping shots and the way the lack of dialogue amplifies ambient sounds are stunning. Story-wise, The Tribe is yet another art-film wallow in cruelty, not nearly as unique as its looks and its world.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    The seething passions of Flaubert’s characters are absent, except when Rhys Ifans (as a greedy merchant) or the splendidly ruthless Marshall-Green are in the room.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Pigeon, in its deadpan, hyper-composed way, is often paralyzingly funny, and there is compassion for the gray-faced souls wandering through it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    The wry situational humor leaves less of an impression than the near-perfect sense of the heat-drenched wistfulness of summer.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Agreeable this film certainly is, but the shagginess never seems to take shape.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The on-camera experts make intelligent, earnest points, but the Web means there’s no such thing as a real ban. Indeed the movies have always been available, as two former neo-Nazis point out.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    Hamer’s style is what might happen if Ulrich Seidl liked people, with immaculate balance in each shot, but the emotions in focus, as well. 1001 Grams is wise about both grief and the need for romance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    This is the penultimate film of Albert Maysles, who died on March 5, and Iris has a bit in common with “Grey Gardens,” his masterpiece. Apfel, unlike the Edies of that movie, is sane — so much so that the movie’s main flaw is lack of conflict. Iris’ marriage to Carl, who turned 100 during filming, is incredibly sweet.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 38 Farran Smith Nehme
    Despite the blazing guns, this script is not so tough.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    Ivo’s farmhouse looks leftover from another century, which gives a timeless feeling, as does the regal bearing of Ulfsak and the dry humor of the script. The film telegraphs its pacifist message early on, but it’s still deeply affecting.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    The heart of Dior and I is with these seamstresses and cutters, artists in their own right.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Farran Smith Nehme
    About Elly shows that the ethical dilemmas of ordinary adults can, with this level of talent, become as gripping as any thriller.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    Intrigue doesn’t begin until the last third of the movie, which is by far the best part. The Victorian melodrama in Effie Gray works better than the Victorian suffering.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    The film is hard on the eyes, having been shot in a low-budget style with the ubiquitous digital palette of gray-beige-taupe. Fortunately, it’s also hilarious, full of humor that is understated, wry and dependent on familiarity with interests as wide as Houellebecq’s own.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Farran Smith Nehme
    White God has been compared to “The Birds,” but there are also echoes of “Lassie Come Home” and even “Dirty Harry.” Director Kornél Mundruczó goes big with allegory, violence, drama and sentiment, and the results are riveting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Farran Smith Nehme
    With ravishing landscapes, violent political allegory and a glacial narrative that takes an abrupt left turn in the third act: Lisandro Alonso’s Jauja resolutely checks every 2015 art-film box.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Farran Smith Nehme
    Eva
    In the last half-hour, themes start to gel. The final scenes are so good, even moving, that they make the earlier stuff look better. But a film concerned with the nature of emotion needs human engagement throughout.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Farran Smith Nehme
    There’s a superficial resemblance to the Dardenne brothers’ “Two Days, One Night,” and like that film it has a strong lead; Gosheva’s Nade is prickly, and no suffering saint.

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