G. Allen Johnson

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For 304 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

G. Allen Johnson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Usual Suspects
Lowest review score: 0 Anaconda
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 55 out of 304
304 movie reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 50 G. Allen Johnson
    Panah Panahi, making his feature debut with Hit the Road, definitely inherited his old man’s trouble-making genes. His eye for composition is accomplished, but the movie meanders and the pacing sometimes drags. The problem, of course, is the filmmaker holds back the relevant information that would keep a viewer engaged until the end.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 G. Allen Johnson
    [Apichatpong’s] films are well-thought-out experiences, unique, disciplined, gorgeously composed and irascibly moving to their own rhythm. What sets Memoria apart from his other work is a new setting: Colombia.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 G. Allen Johnson
    Polish director Malgorzata Szumowska (“The Other Lamb”) directs for the big screen, with eye-pleasing mountain visuals (the Slovenian Alps subs for Mount Washington) and a well-executed adventure. But when the setting is in civilization, the drama grinds to a halt.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 25 G. Allen Johnson
    With “After Yang,” the distinctive filmmaker Kogonada has made a movie that is at once ambitious yet timid, asking big questions but providing no answers, not even clues. It’s a thought experiment, but a thought that meanders.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 G. Allen Johnson
    Ellis’ story could have used a little fleshing out, no pun intended. Instead, a terrific cast is left floundering in the dark, searching for the film’s human dimension. Cursed, indeed.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 G. Allen Johnson
    Decker proudly revels in Lennie’s scattered uniqueness, even as Lennie navigates the minefield of her choices and says some truly kooky things (“I wish my shadow could get up and walk beside me”). YA movies might not be your bag, but if they are, perhaps the NorCal vibe of “The Sky Is Everywhere” will strike a weepy chord.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 25 G. Allen Johnson
    So it’s not my bag, but I went into Jackass Forever with the best intentions.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 25 G. Allen Johnson
    Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn is provocative and irritating — and intentionally so. That makes it particularly annoying, because even as you’re provoked and irritated, you are also aware that writer-director Radu Jude wanted you to feel that way.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 G. Allen Johnson
    It’s as if someone made a backstage musical without any musical numbers, just the backstage part.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 G. Allen Johnson
    Swan Song, of course, belongs to Ali. He conveys Cameron’s vise grip of moral dilemma, fear of dying and concern for his family visually, often wordlessly, and it is a complex, layered performance. Let’s just say this is an unusual way to confront your inner demons.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 G. Allen Johnson
    Like Yûsuke’s beloved classic Saab 9000 that Misaki drives ever so carefully, Drive My Car moves ahead with smooth confidence and a fine-tuned reliability.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 G. Allen Johnson
    Writing With Fire, directed by Sushmit Ghosh and Rintu Thomas, tags along with these remarkable women as they go about their work. Viewers sit in on editorial meetings and training sessions, and go out in the field...It’s well worth seeking out.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 G. Allen Johnson
    To imagine the future, one must consider the past and be active in the present. C’mon C’mon is about the present, and how precious it truly is.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 G. Allen Johnson
    Every character, even minor ones, is well thought out and cast; the eye-popping visual design is not only inspired and mesmerizing but also functional; and memorable songs by Lin-Manuel Miranda and others complement the story perfectly.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 50 G. Allen Johnson
    The first film seemed a fully formed, lived-in world. The sequel leaves Julie on her own; an interior monologue that Hogg, and Swinton Byrne, can’t quite externalize.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 25 G. Allen Johnson
    The “Paranormal Activity” films, to their credit, build slowly, backloading the chills in the second half. That means, to get through that first hour, the characters have to be interesting, but these self-absorbed Gen Z wannabe filmmakers are anything but.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 75 G. Allen Johnson
    This is the kind of made-for-cable-level movie where a pedestrian script (by Richard D’Ovidio) with the usual horror cliches is elevated by strong acting, no-nonsense direction and a couple of neat twists.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 G. Allen Johnson
    As the documentary was produced by National Geographic with the cooperation of the Cousteau Society, Garbus has access to some fabulous, colorfully restored footage, some of it never before seen, that makes this an eye-popping experience — in theaters especially.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 G. Allen Johnson
    One of the most playful films about cinema in recent memory, and even with its angst, is more joyful than any film Bergman made on the island.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 G. Allen Johnson
    So while Fuqua’s The Guilty is not much different from the original, his direction is crisp, Gyllenhaal’s performance grows on you and Riley Keough (Zola), as the voice of the woman who is abducted, is terrific.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 G. Allen Johnson
    The absorbing rags-to-riches-to-rags story — a must for any classic film fan — is told in The Most Beautiful Boy in the World, directed by Kristina Lindström and Kristian Petri.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 G. Allen Johnson
    Showalter’s The Eyes of Tammy Faye, which credits the documentary as its inspiration, recreates some of the doc’s scenes almost verbatim. But while imitation might be the sincerest form of flattery, Abe Sylvia’s ambitious but shallow script has something spiritually missing — namely, a point to it all.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 G. Allen Johnson
    But Eastwood is undercut by the unbearably weak screenplay by Nick Schenk, who adapts a 1975 novel by N. Richard Nash. Schenk has turned in good work for Eastwood before, including “Gran Torino” and “The Mule,” but here his strategy seems to be having his characters explain everything that they’re doing and feeling, much of which should be delivered visually. Action is character, after all.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 G. Allen Johnson
    One wonders how a master of truly twisted movies — say, a David Lynch or a Brian De Palma — would have approached “The Voyeurs.” One suspects they would have a bit more fun and taken us further down the moral rabbit hole. And the sex would have been better too.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 G. Allen Johnson
    The strength of Fauci is its underlying theme, which is really not about Fauci at all. Hoffman and Tobias jump back and forth in time, from the AIDS to Ebola to the COVID years, and surreptitiously a portrait emerges of the uneasy relationship between the scientific community, the general public and the political establishment.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 G. Allen Johnson
    Reminiscence is never not interesting, but Joy leaves a lot of the intriguing issues unsatisfactorily explored.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 G. Allen Johnson
    Aided by the star magnetism of Yen and Tse, and back in his element on the colorful streets of Hong Kong, Chan goes out with both guns blazing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 G. Allen Johnson
    Like practically every other animated movie meant for mass consumption, the movie gets lost in the chase — the point where story flow is interrupted so that characters get lost as they try to achieve their objective and a manufactured villain is trying to keep them from their goal.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 G. Allen Johnson
    The film’s writer-director is British-born Sabrina Doyle, who is making her feature debut after spending the past decade in Los Angeles making short films. Her touch is nearly perfect: authentic, patient, guiding — giving her actors plenty of space. And they respond.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 25 G. Allen Johnson
    There’s one big problem about No Ordinary Man: The Billy Tipton Documentary: It’s not really about Billy Tipton. Instead, it’s about how transgender representation is perceived in the media, chiefly between 1989, when Tipton died, and current times.

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