For 90 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Jake Coyle's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 88 Burning
Lowest review score: 25 The Happytime Murders
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 61 out of 90
  2. Negative: 3 out of 90
90 movie reviews
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Coyle
    It’s starting to seem like every franchise film, when in search of a story, throws a battle against the wall and hopes something sticks. Not only has this gotten tiresome, but it also sacrifices what we came here for in the first place: Jolie and Pfeiffer glowering at each other.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Coyle
    It’s a movie best seen less as a historical epic and more as a metaphor for a rising young movie star coming up in a culture he aims to subvert.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Coyle
    A calculatedly combustible concoction, designed, like its chaos-creating character, to cause a stir. To provoke and distort. I wish it was as radical as it thinks it is.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Coyle
    Abominable is sweet and simple enough, but its emotionality always feels thin and, like much of the film, paint by numbers.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Coyle
    Aside from verging on the one-note, that focus constricts the very linear, very self-contained Ad Astra, a taut but inflexible chamber piece in a genre given to symphony.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Coyle
    Taking each storyline at a time, all accompanied by flashbacks, gives each character some depth, even as the crowded film — at nearly three-hours long — verges on turning into a clown car. That sheer much-ness is in the spirit of King’s massive book. “Chapter Two” is, for better or worse, a horror carnival.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Coyle
    Brittany Runs a Marathon starts comically; its first moments, with Brittany working as an usher at an off-Broadway theater are its funniest. But it grows increasingly earnest. That’s part of the movie’s charm but also what leads it a little off track.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Coyle
    Blinded by the Light isn’t a new tune, but it’s sung with an infectious passion and it captures something sincere about the globe-spanning, life-changing influence of great pop music.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Coyle
    Good Boys mines that gulf between childhood and adolescence like few films have before.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Coyle
    Even if the material — a haunted scarecrow, a young woman’s vengeful ghost — can feel stale off the page, Øvredal’s filmmaking is fresh and vibrant.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Coyle
    Usually, it’s pleasingly aware of its own silliness. But there are blind spots.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Coyle
    Pitt, in particular, appears so utterly self-possessed. It’s a swaggering grade-A movie star performance in a movie that celebrates all that movie stars can accomplish — which, for Tarantino, is anything.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Coyle
    Jon Favreau’s The Lion King, so abundant with realistic simulations of the natural world, is curiously lifeless.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Coyle
    The movie’s premise is one long Uber ad, but it’s a clever enough buddy comedy setup, and both Nanjiani and Bautista are good comic performers. So what’s missing here?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Coyle
    What makes Annabelle Comes Home rise above its well-trod narrative are the actresses and Dauberman’s sensitive attention to each of them.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Coyle
    The plotting is clunky and haphazard. But when together, Thompson, Hemsworth and Nanjiani turn Men In Black: International into something funny and silly: a pleasant enough lark in formal wear.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Coyle
    It’s all so handsomely shot and deliberately staged that you might at times worry that The Last Black Man in San Francisco is leaning more toward picturesque than profound. But when Talbot’s film rises to its rousing and sensitive climax, the fairy tale falls away and something authentically soulful emerges.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Coyle
    It’s an admirably fun and light movie about more serious issues of representation and equality.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Coyle
    The insanely winning Booksmart boasts too many breakthroughs to count. There are the two leads, Kaitlyn Dever and Beanie Feldstein, both of whom we’ve seen before but not like this. There is the director, Olivia Wilde, whose debut behind the camera is remarkably assured. And then there is the teen comedy genre, itself, which Booksmart has blown wide open.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Coyle
    Rocketman is happiest with its feet far off the ground in a dreamy pop splendor, with headlights all along the highway.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Coyle
    There is no doubt that these sequences are quite easily, in form and execution, a cut above what most any other action film is currently doing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Coyle
    The Biggest Little Farm can at times feel like a larger, better-produced version of the kind of viral video that spreads on Facebook, equal parts uplifting and self-congratulating. It’s a self-contained film about a self-contained paradise.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Coyle
    Generous in humor, spirit and sentimentality, Anthony and Joe Russo's Endgame is a surprisingly full feast of blockbuster-making that, through some time-traveling magic, looks back nostalgically at Marvel's decade of world domination. This is the Marvel machine working at high gear, in full control of its myth-making powers and uncovering more emotion in its fictional cosmos than ever before.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Coyle
    Someone Great has not exactly rewritten the rom-com rule book. Where it distinguishes itself is in the fresh faces of it cast (the rom-com is not known as the most diverse of genres) and in focusing on the hard realities of breakup rather than the fairytale of falling in love.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Coyle
    The pacing is sluggish when it should be quickening, and nothing in how Little turns out will surprise anyone. Yet the trio of Hall, Rae and Martin makes Little a consistently pleasant experience.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Jake Coyle
    It’s not plot deviations from King’s novel that hamper Pet Sematary. It’s that, from early on, Kölsch and Widmyer, rely less on the detailed accumulation of atmosphere that King built his tale on, than jump cuts and music cues to build suspense. It puts Pet Sematary on a more familiar genre track.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Jake Coyle
    Part of the fun of Amazing Grace is watching not just those in the thrall of Franklin (Mick Jagger can be seen bopping in the back of the church) but witnessing the awe Franklin evokes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Coyle
    Burton’s Dumbo, while inevitably lacking much of the magic of the original, has charms and melancholies of its own, starting, naturally, with the elephant in the room. Of all the CGI make-overs, this Dumbo is the most textured, sweetest and most soulful of creatures.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Jake Coyle
    Us
    In Us, Peele has produced a terrifying artifact: a sinister ballet of doppelgangers and inversions that makes flesh the unseen underbelly lurking beneath every sunny American dream and behind every contented nuclear family. It’s a scissor-sharp rebuke to anyone who’s ever held hands and sang “Kumbaya.”
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Jake Coyle
    Triple Frontier has the good sense to take a macho, Expendables-like set-up and turn it inward. It just doesn’t go far enough.

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