For 265 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kate Taylor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Silent Land
Lowest review score: 12 Joy
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 24 out of 265
265 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Kate Taylor
    With a plethora of archival material and strong interviews, this documentary argues that the exuberant Julia Child was a protofeminist who invented the profession of TV chef as she introduced the notion that food should taste good to the land of the Jell-O salad.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    Leong’s documentary realism is powerful – if tough on an audience – but his fiction skills are erratic in a film that relies too heavily on Sister Tse’s narration, much repeated flashbacks and heavy exposition of the characters’ motivations.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    If you can ignore an ending ripped straight from the AA playbook, there’s minor fun to be had along the way.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Kate Taylor
    A melodrama split, then cross-connecting, into three separate parts, Drunken Birds is a startling thing that just narrowly avoids whiffing the landing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    Sometimes, the animators find an expressive style to match difficult content – a suicide, a mercy killing and several sex scenes – and sometimes they just make the images of Salomon and the refugee with whom she falls in love seem leaden in comparison to the artist’s sprightly line.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    The story is running a bit thin by the end, yet the almost comic character of the investigative detective is underused. Still, the unlikely presence of Guangzhou, steamy by day, gritty by night, and the shifting viewpoints on the accident add an engaging originality.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    The dialogue is quietly scathing, and the production values are sumptuous. But Davies seems most interested in Sassoon as a symbol of hemmed-in Englishness. As a character, he remains poetically opaque.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    An icy Sarah Gadon can’t plumb it, offering a quietly mannered performance where a beautifully furrowed brow and occasional tear suggest the character cares more about looking elegant than dying. Thankfully, in the warmer roles of Yoli and her resilient Mennonite mother, Alison Pill and Mare Winningham do find the big broken heart at the core of this story.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Kate Taylor
    There is exquisite dramatic tension here, built partly by Campion’s deft storytelling and partly by her powerful cast.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Kate Taylor
    Billed by the director as his tribute to cinema, One Second is affectionate and sweet – perhaps a bit too sweet, considering this premiere was much delayed after the film was held back by the Chinese government for supposed technical reasons in 2019.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    Cumberbatch excels once again at breathing life into a sorrowful genius.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Kate Taylor
    The director’s larger point is deployed with such subtlety that it creeps up on the viewer with devastating force.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    The laughs and the wisdom creep up on you in this small and subtle comedy about male relationships.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    Today’s YA generation is unlikely to appreciate the monosyllabic performances and stately pace, but Pilote delivers a beautiful film in the tradition of the Quebec canon.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 82 Kate Taylor
    Based on the 2015 book of the same title, The Hidden Life of Trees is a documentary both simple and startling.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Kate Taylor
    Whatever the experts say, any viewer can observe the large gap between the damaged original and the perfect restoration. Perhaps the only definitive thing one can say about the most expensive painting in the world is that, regardless of who painted it in the 16th century, it is a creature of the 21st.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Kate Taylor
    Yes, The Father is a familiar story and a universal one. Yet Zeller has been uniquely inventive in the way he evokes the unreliability of memory and the subjectivity of experience in the senile – and the healthy.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    Mainly, it features dramatic footage of the protests, following the protestors’ logic as a leaderless movement coalesces on social media and crowd-sources strategies on the fly.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    The particularly imaginative handling of the shifts between the human and the more ethereal animal incarnations represent the film’s most rewarding aspect.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    The concept and the laughs hold strong amid all the craziness because Seligman has such affectionate sympathy for her mendacious protagonist.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Kate Taylor
    It’s a film that considers young heartbreak so earnestly, it risks taking itself too seriously, too.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Kate Taylor
    Today, homophobia may still blight many a queen’s family relations, but Stage Mother feels dated and formulaic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Kate Taylor
    To watch German documentarian Thomas Heise’s marathon family memoir Heimat is a Space in Time, the viewer has to continually analyze the relationship between text and image.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    Mainly, this movie chatters when it should sing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    Ambivalent and tepid as it attempts to fashion a tick-tock thriller from Ailes’s downfall.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Kate Taylor
    Both shocking and beautiful, the film impresses itself on the viewer with the awesome scale of the imagery – and with the urgency behind it. We have entered an epoch in which human activity is shaping the planet more than any natural force. Anthropocene bears witness that something’s got to give.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    Perhaps the bravest thing here is Banderas’ reserved performance: Selfish, hypochondriacal and sadly cocooned, his fictional film director is not a flattering portrait of an aging auteur.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Kate Taylor
    The culminative effect of the cinematography is inconclusive as the character remains trapped in grief.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    The restaurant story is wonderfully taut, with Egoyan in full control of his always extravagant imagery.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Kate Taylor
    It is extremely difficult to make something as invisible and ineffable as religious faith seem real, let alone touching, on film; doing that is only one of the achievements of Fernando Meirelles’ unusual look inside the papacy.

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