For 230 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kate Taylor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Salesman
Lowest review score: 12 Joy
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 22 out of 230
230 movie reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Kate Taylor
    This film, about a French war correspondent and the Kurdish Amazon with whom she is embedded, has the worthy intention of telling the story of the women’s battalions in Kurdistan, but it’s formulaic and melodramatic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    Ruben’s story may be as oddly illogical as any of his nightmares, but the animation here is a dreamy delight.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    With strong performances in a scheme of both sensible updates and clever revivals, Mary Poppins Returns is as impressive as the 1964 version it joyfully recalls – except in one key area.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    Perhaps you can accuse all historical fiction of presentism, the sin of applying contemporary values to historical events. Why does the past interest us if not for the comparisons it provides with the present? But with the example of "The Favourite’s" wittily anachronistic romp through the 18th-century court of Queen Anne so fresh at hand, it is hard not to judge the earnest Mary Queen of Scots for its ignorance of the problem.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    As Kurt finds his true art in the West, thanks to the help of a fictional version of Joseph Beuys, the film turns gripping, but it ultimately reduces art appreciation to the autobiographical.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    The results are highly affecting – so much so, that viewers who suffer from motion sickness may find the film hard to watch. If the approach feels empathetic rather than pretentious, it’s thanks to a crucial anchor: Willem Dafoe’s subtle and humble performance conjures a pitiable van Gogh, shredded by doubt and estranged from people, yet urgently aware of his painterly vision.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    For all its successful debunking of the market, there isn’t enough of this prickly love in The Price of Everything.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    A critic needs only two words to dispense with The Grinch; the first one is bah.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Kate Taylor
    Both leads fit their performances seamlessly into this destabilizing scheme, providing a provocative timelessness to the characters.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    So, the safely scary and often amusing formula holds. Meanwhile, the movie’s conclusion includes enough plot about Stine’s fate to suggest Goosebumps 3 will feature more of the elusive Black and that can only be a good thing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    There are only two erotic scenes between the two women, and Macneill, Sevigny and Stewart handle them with conviction: For all the horror of her situation, Lizzie needed some larger motivation to wield her axe. Lizzie dramatically provides it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Kate Taylor
    Love, Gilda reveals this but does not probe it. With various soft and admiring interviews, it relies mainly on Radner’s own words to hint at how dark things got.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    Hansen-Love’s ability to evoke the unspoken remains in full play as she returns to themes of young love and emotional crisis, but much of the film is in English and both dialogue and delivery feel stilted. Meanwhile, it’s never clear why being the object of a youthful crush might be a good cure for PTSD.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Kate Taylor
    The core trio are smooth and amusing in their roles, but the larger plot is filled with painful stereotypes, from a tough female cop to various black gangsters. Meanwhile, as the sympathetic criminals try to outwit police, the social theme remains unfocused – despite heartfelt pleas for street people, especially the homeless Inuit of Montreal.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    Part police procedural, part supernatural thriller, part lesson in metaphysics and all neo-noir, Carol Morley’s Out of Blue never gels into a convincing whole.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    The apocalyptic vision of the heartland created by Sutton and his cast (based on the novel by Frank Bill) is impressively convincing, even if the themes are often overstated and the film itself is very hard to watch.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    [A] bafflingly unbalanced film by American auteur director Alex Ross Perry.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 25 Kate Taylor
    Perhaps explanations for all these improbable scenarios were lost on the cutting-room floor during Dolan’s notoriously prolonged editing process.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    Colette is a satisfyingly conventional biopic about a highly unconventional woman.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    Jenkins creates many remarkable scenes, particularly as the male characters discuss the racist realities with which they live.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    The naively amenable character is wonderfully observed by Fonte, and early scenes show delicious whimsy and black comedy...but as the film’s numbing brutality takes hold the character’s passivity makes the action drag in places.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 63 Kate Taylor
    Form and content seem oddly divorced, but music – the Polish folk tunes, communist-propaganda anthems and Parisian torch songs – sets the mood and saves the day.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Kate Taylor
    It’s a film full of delicate metaphors and gentle humour – the locals have elaborate rules for giving a warning honk of the horn on their one-track road but refuse a simple suggestion to widen it – and meanders, sometimes a bit elliptically, to its conclusion.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Kate Taylor
    It rejoices in a classic structure in which one upward trajectory and one downward meet for a shining moment in the middle. Under Cooper’s direction – and thanks to his chemistry with his co-star – the movie throbs with the excitement of that meeting, while the downfall of his alcoholic rocker achieves an almost tragic catharsis.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    As he transfers his talents to a European setting and Spanish-speaking cast, Farhadi loses none of his remarkable ability to observe close relationships collapsing under stress.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    Director Karyn Kusama shifts dexterously between the present and the past, unspooling a satisfyingly twisted piece of storytelling by writers Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi, who succeed in making both plots gripping. Kudos to Kidman for taking on an ugly role (both physically and morally) and for giving both versions of the character a convincing hardness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    The film will make highly informative viewing both for those who get it – and for those who don’t.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Kate Taylor
    As director Michael Noer struggles to tease a theme out of a string of exploits, Papillon remains as entertaining as ever.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Kate Taylor
    Coixet occasionally overplays her hand – a dropped headscarf, a sudden death – as does a constipated Bill Nighy in the role of the reclusive widower who is Florence’s one ally, but overall, the film is stealthily impressive.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kate Taylor
    As the obscenities of wealth accumulate while a large cast of Asian and Eurasian actors render their many silly characters, the source of the laughter becomes troubling.

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