Leslie Felperin

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For 582 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leslie Felperin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Sisters with Transistors
Lowest review score: 10 Hector and the Search for Happiness
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 582
582 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    While the ensuing sense of despair that overwhelms the drama is credible, it does bring with it a certain sense of torpor that makes the film a bit of a grind in the midsection.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Leslie Felperin
    Amid all this dross there is a charming scene in where a young couple, played by Natalie Burn and Michael Sirow, banter and giggle: their screen chemistry is like something out of a Richard Linklater movie. What a shame one of the characters gets murdered not long after.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Leslie Felperin
    It’s not so much the running time of 156 minutes that will tire you out as the incredible sonic, visual and emotional overload generated by the work itself; perhaps this is ideally seen first in a cinema for maximum impact and then again in small, digestible chunks at home.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Leslie Felperin
    Apart from the occasional bit of voiceover from Clean, our hero barely says much at all, leaving it to Brody to do a lot of acting with those big sad eyes. It makes the film feel a bit like a silent movie but not one of the good ones.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    The producers have clearly paid up for the extras, sets and visual effects making this a lavish work, never dull for a second of its ample running time – even if some viewers may find the sentimentality a little hard to digest.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Leslie Felperin
    The Sea Beast gets the balance just right between rollicking action scenes, the inevitable didactic anti-hunting message about respecting other species’ right to exist and family-friendly humour.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Leslie Felperin
    This is undoubtedly a work of historic significance, made by a master in his field – but beware that it often feels like a film-making notebook, full of doodles and ideas but not especially cohesive as a story.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Leslie Felperin
    Altogether it would be pretty bouncy and fun if it didn’t have the wretched Gibson in it. Isn’t the industry awash with ageing stars that could fill the role just as well?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    Sure, this is a talky movie, big on debates and low on action, and may feel somewhat theatrical – but that’s not necessarily a bad thing, especially when the performances are this subtle, expressive and electric.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Leslie Felperin
    Nasty, brutish and mercifully short, but occasionally mildly amusing, Dashcam represents another dollop of pandemic-themed shock schlock from writer-director Rob Savage, recently renowned for his lockdown-set horror pic Host.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    Ava
    Mysius loses control of the tone, and the wayward direction of the last half hour, which unfolds mostly at a gypsy wedding and goes on 15 minutes too long, suggests difficulty finding resolution, a common problem with first films.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    Quite watchable, even sort of plot-driven — for a Serra film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Leslie Felperin
    Dhont and his team know just how to turn up the emotional dials with stunning magic-hour lensing that gives golden-haired Dambrine a halo of backlit suffering as he stands in fields of nodding dahlias, that most gloriously domestic and benevolent flower.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Leslie Felperin
    This may be the Dardennes’ most emotionally engaging film in a while — a tragedy told with utter clarity, centered on protagonists entirely deserving of our sympathy, empathy, all the ‘pathies you’ve got.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Leslie Felperin
    A regular beat of tension and release plays out as people get saved only to face new dangers, following the template of disaster films since the beginning of cinema, but it’s done well here. The visual effects are impressive, especially the water, which is so notoriously hard to animate.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Leslie Felperin
    Corsage . . . although a late entry to the disaffected royalty subcategory, is arguably one of the most interesting so far, much closer to the ludic, imaginative queen of the genre, Sofia Coppola’s Marie Antoinette (2006).
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Leslie Felperin
    There are also good bits in this based-on-a-true-story drama, including the aforementioned performances and a commitment to theology so sincere it’s not afraid to bore an audience with lots of pin-head-fine debates about Godhood. If Gibson weren’t part of the package it might be possible to like it more.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    The film engages with Cave and Warren Ellis’ creative bond, one that’s produced some sublime work but also self-indulgent noodling (of which there’s a little too much here). Indeed, some might wish the spotlight was on Ellis more, a fascinating character who may be the more musically gifted of the pair, but not as capable of holding the spotlight like Cave – who has his suits, rumbly baritone and carefully coiffed too-black hair.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    It’s a very tolerable watch, if somewhat interminable and rather lacking in proper drama. But perhaps that’s just what an audience of hardened Dion fans would want from a viewing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    Most welcome of all is the generous sprinkling of good one-liners thanks to screenwriter Max Taxe’s witty script, solid direction from Christopher Winterbauer, and a cast with nippy comic timing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Leslie Felperin
    The lonely, uncanny and sometimes unthinkingly violent world of childhood is explored with chilling candor and exceptional skill in writer-director Eskil Vogt’s arthouse horror feature The Innocents.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Leslie Felperin
    Writer-director Brendan Muldowney is better at contriving striking images of horror, filmed with umbral gloom by cinematographer Tom Comerford, than at the character and story stuff.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    Smart, funny and endearingly sweary even when he loses the power to speak without computer assistance, Barkan is a charismatic character who’s easy to like, although one wonders how much the documentary crew resisted showing anything that might dent the halo the film sets round his head.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    In light of the strange, brutal ending that’s more foreshadowed than it seems, it’s hard to work out where Weisse wants to land on issues around the best way to coax talent, especially in fields such as music where you have to put in a relentless amount of hours to achieve the highest results.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    It takes proper acting talent, boosted by strong direction from Wladyka, to pull the film along the way Reis does. She’s vulnerable, frightening and relentlessly physical.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    It all sort of comes together in the end, but there’s no earthly reason that it should all have taken two hours. Maybe the spoiler is the unfeasible length of the running time.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    It’s best not to think too hard about it and just let the striking imagery and saturated colours wash over your retinas.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Leslie Felperin
    Although the focus is on one particular nightclub and its owner, the film acts as an accessible slice of jazz history that might usefully entice viewers to learn more.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    Although made on a tiny budget, this highly original exercise in folk horror punches well above its weight with snappy dialogue, trippy visual effects and impressive camerawork.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Leslie Felperin
    This stands as one of Austrian director Ulrich Seidl’s better but not quite best features in a pretty consistent career, not as scurrilously seedy as him at his worst, or as merciless, but not as ambitious or startlingly insightful as his best.

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