For 246 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Feeney's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Hermia & Helena
Lowest review score: 12 Last Ounce of Courage
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 27 out of 246
246 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    John Lewis: Good Trouble isn’t a great film, but it has a great subject — and excellent timing.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    One wonders if a director more playful than Kenneth Branagh might have come up with something less hectic and more fun — or even just as hectic and more fun. Taika Waititi, anyone? Jojo Rabbit is almost as odd a name as Artemis Fowl.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    This extremely dry film mixes humor and melancholy to distinctive, if muffled, effect. Take away the muffled part, and that’s very Nighy, too. In being winningly understated and sometimes maddeningly stylized, Sometimes Always Never is a bit like Alan.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    It’s a strange thing when a movie is at its most dynamic when it’s at its most didactic. But that’s the case with Da 5 Bloods. Lee is consciously juggling a lot of balls: not just fact and fiction, past and present, but also humor, action, family drama, and tragedy. The balls don’t stay in the air. The movie has the bumpety-bump pacing of a mini-series forced into a single overlong episode.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Everyone in the documentary agrees that the undertaking was truly terrible and misconceived. The extensive footage here does nothing to contradict such a view.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    What makes Steve and Rob so funny is that they’re so human: petty, insecure, rivalrous, as well as charming and hilarious. Nothing’s more human than sadness, not even laughter, and laughter The Trip to Greece has to offer in plenty. What’s their next destination? Wherever it is, the important thing is that there be one.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    If anything, the film does a bit too much, going for variety and breadth sometimes at the expense of depth. There are a lot of bases to touch here, and touching pretty much all of them means several get touched too lightly. Jazz trumpeter and New Orleans native Terence Blanchard serves as a passionate, highly informed guide.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    So it’s no small tribute to Feldstein — who really is something — to say that she’s the very best thing in How to Build a Girl despite being so wildly miscast. Her performance is a tour de force, even if it’s too forceful for either its own good or that of the movie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Even when events get intense, even violent, and they do, there’s nothing abrupt. Corpus Christi never erupts. It unfolds.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Balloon manages to combine slickness and sentimentality, predictability and implausibility. The fact that it’s based on a true story — the closing credits include photographs of the actual families — does not make up for the amassing of red herrings, close calls, and occasions for head-scratching.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Fatiguing for grown-ups, “TWT” may well scare, or at least unsettle, kids under 6. And kids much over 6 are likely to tire of the unrelenting cutesiness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The best thing about Akin’s film is the dance stuff. The movie begins with arresting black-and-white archival footage of Georgian dancing. The rehearsals in the dance studio come alive, thanks in no small part to the drum-and-accordion accompaniment. Kinetically, the style of dance is percussive and assertive. It doesn’t so much flow as boil.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Robertson’s ex-wife, Dominique. Her thoughtful presence is a very welcome departure from the standard rock-doc formula. She provides the kind of reality check — an under-the-influence Manuel almost got her killed when he totaled her Mustang, with her in the passenger seat — rarely found in such films. In that sense, it isn’t just the Band that was different but “Once Were Brothers” is, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    The documentary loses a bit when Dagg returns home, and an alarmingly perky score doesn’t help. Late in life, after her tenure struggles, she published a new edition of her dissertation and found herself rediscovered.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    When the best thing about a movie is the title, that’s never a good sign. It’s all downhill from there? Exactly, and that’s the case with Downhill.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Both Pryce and Hopkins are fine. But on the basis of the rest of the movie they shouldn’t have a prayer.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Wolf relies on the videos far too much. That over-reliance makes Recorder feel padded, as does his frequent use of reenactments.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    With so much going on, it’s easy to overlook that the most profound and moving relationship in either film is the bond between Elsa and Anna. It’s the most human and least-calculated thing in “Frozen” or Frozen II. Their love is the ultimate special effect. Ice is nice. But sisterhood is what’s really powerful.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The Cotton Club does look terrific and has its moments. It’s certainly not an embarrassment. It’s just not . . . very good.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    It’s McKellen’s and Mirren’s. Their back-and-forth provides a satisfaction akin to watching two masters volley at Wimbledon. Unfortunately, the ball these masters are playing with manages the perplexing trick of being worn and waterlogged while also far too bouncy: stodginess and over-plotting is not a good combination.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    It’s never a good sign when the most dramatic scene in a movie owes its power to C-SPAN footage. That’s the case with The Report.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    What’s best about the movie is mood and texture, and the ensemble cast (the second best thing about the movie) mostly defers to those qualities. In that sense, Motherless Brooklyn might be described as novelistic, and in a good way.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Just to remind us that he’s Almodóvar — and to make it up to us that Serrano looks so implausibly different from Cruz — the movie ends with a bravura, meta-movie flourish that’s at once dazzling and matter of fact. It’s one more example here of Almodóvar’s ability to take pairs — not just people, but concepts (like, say, present and past, or pain and glory) — and happily join them.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The biggest problem with Where’s My Roy Cohn? is the documentary’s attitude toward its subject: not that it’s critical (an uncritical approach to Cohn would be about as interesting as a daytime visit to Studio 54), but that it so thoroughly accepts his view of himself.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    So expect the upending of expectations: visual, emotional, tonal, generic. Especially generic. Is First Love a comedy? A crime thriller? A love story? An advertorial for subscriptions to Guns and Ammo?...Yes.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Ad Astra is moody, meditative, and slow (though not the knife fight or rover demolition derby).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    What’s stimulating and fun about “Raise Hell” is quite stimulating and fun. But the more smitten you become with its subject — and it’s hard not to be — the more you feel there’s something missing or that what isn’t missing is yet too thin.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    A lot of jazz labels have mattered, but none has mattered the way Blue Note did — and, thanks to a proudly hip-hop-inflected present, still does. It’s the gold standard of recorded improvisational music. Sophie Huber’s briskly reverential documentary, Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes, lets us see and hear why.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Belkin’s smart, dynamic documentary shares its subject’s slam-bang style. That’s good. Watching it is exhilarating. It also shares Wallace’s aversion to nuance. That’s less good. Belkin has a weakness for split screens and rapid-fire editing. In fairness, that’s one way to cram in more material, and Belkin has lots (and lots) of material to cram in.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Sword of Trust has a dogged weirdness all its own, a singularity that extends to Maron having written the excellently jangly score. When was the last time you saw — or heard — a movie where the star composed the music? It’s just part of the its-own-world quality of Sword of Trust.

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