Matt Zoller Seitz

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For 456 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matt Zoller Seitz's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Meddler
Lowest review score: 0 Alice Through the Looking Glass
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 34 out of 456
456 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Zoller Seitz
    At times the movie feels like Hereditary without the supernatural elements and gore. It's a psychological horror movie about the ordinary miseries and compromises of family.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    There is, nevertheless, something to be said for a documentary that tries to do something different and perhaps impossible, even if it doesn't quite get there. And in the end, any flaws or missed opportunities are subsumed by the movie's sincerity and wealth of insight.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It seems more likely that this is a film about discoveries rather than statements, with the camera following people and then abandoning them to seek insight elsewhere, by looking into things rather than merely looking at them.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It draws together a first-rank cast of character actresses and actors, most of them over 50, then mostly fails to invest the material with the invention and snappiness needed to invigorate it and make it memorable, as opposed to merely agreeable.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This is an unrelentingly gripping and often disturbing film that dares to visualize (with taste and restraint) some of the vilest behavior the species is capable of, and take full measure of the psychic damage it inflicts on innocent victims.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It takes prodigious comic gifts to make a loathsome, pathetic character so mesmerizing that you enjoy watching him dig himself into a hole for 90-plus minutes. Jim Cummings, the star, editor, co-writer, and co-director of The Beta Test, has those gifts.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This one is a mostly likable effort, but it doesn't quite feel like a self-contained movie with a shape and a discernible point; it's more of a collection of material arranged in a way that more or less makes sense.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The Harder They Fall is a bloody pleasure: a revenge Western packed with memorable characters played by memorable actors, each scene and moment staged for voluptuous beauty and kinetic power.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This is a dazzling film—not just one of Haynes' best, but possibly the one that his whole career, with all of its self-aware formal and historical experiments, has been building toward.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This is a difficult movie to sit through, not just because of the subject matter, but because it's so honest in dramatizing how people process tragedy and carry it through life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Coming Home in the Dark settles into the memory as a mesmerizing missed opportunity at worst, a promise of future classics at best.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    This movie will be of particular interest to students who want a lively, thoughtful presentation of basic historical subjects but aren't going to get it in classrooms where the curriculum is approved by people who are mainly concerned with avoiding discomfort and preserving the status quo.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Set in Argentina in 1980, Azor is a quiet, unhurried, un-flashy film, and that's what makes it unnerving. You come away from it feeling that you've been given a greater understanding of how authoritarian power-grabs happen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Worth seems to get it, all of it, in a way that films of this type rarely do, which makes it all the more irritating when it appears to retreat from the implications of the way it's telling its complex narrative.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It seems clear that Corbine wanted to make a personal movie, not a history lesson or morality play aimed at hypothetical white viewers, and it's impossible to look at the finished product without feeling that he succeeded.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    As the pandemic is still raging at this moment, it's obviously too early to tell whether "Together" is one for the ages or another one from that time. It's alternately brilliant and amateurish—a four-star acting masterclass at its best and a two-star ripped-from-the-headlines botch at its worst. Split the difference and you'll arrive at something like a holistic consideration.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Sweet Girl is too long and disorganized, and often just too much, for its own good. It seems to want to be five, possibly six landmark 1990s and early aughts blockbusters at once.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It has solid performances by an eccentric ensemble cast, charming moments of banter, and sex scenes that seem shockingly frank by American standards (they still take their clothes off in France). But it's too slow, disorganized, and muddled to make coherent points, and it often has to remind itself that it's based on a fairy tale.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Change is about decisive shift in speed, emphasis, and norms over a period of time, as much as it's about the shock of any individual event. Homeroom is at its best when it's helping us see this.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    There's something off-kilter about it, in a good way. It has a confidence that might not be earned but is still enjoyable to see. It's tapping into something true and knows it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The film's tight construction and prolific action scenes carry it, and Blunt and Johnson do the irresistible force/immovable object dynamic well enough, swapping energies as the story demands.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Val
    The film is most satisfying when it's just giving us details of Kilmer's philosophy of acting, which is uncompromising to the point of being exasperating, but lively, and ultimately preferable to the default attitude of so many straight male actors who denigrate their profession as trivial, or somehow unbecoming of an adult.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It's frustrating to watch a movie that seems so unable to get out of its own way—all the more so because this is one of the last collaborations between the Oscar-winning screenwriting team of Diana Ossana and Larry McMurtry.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Pig
    It's attentive to regret and failure in ways that American films tend to avoid for fear of bumming viewers out and making them warn other people not to watch the movie. And it seems to understand the way people mythologize others and themselves, and the reasons it happens.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The uncanny confidence of Dick Gregory comes through from the opening minutes of The One and Only Dick Gregory, and he only becomes more formidable as the film unfolds.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The performances are better than the material deserves—particularly those of De la Reguera and Huerta, whose reactive closeups have a silent-movie expressiveness; and Lucas, who once again proves that he's willing to play deeply unlikable characters without signaling to the audience that he's a nice guy offscreen, actually.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    The action set-pieces are thrilling and intentionally hilarious, though the digital effects and compositing vary in quality.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Matt Zoller Seitz
    Nicole Riegel's debut feature Holler is a film to treasure—an intimate drama about family and work, steeped in details that can only have been captured by a storyteller who lived them.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Matt Zoller Seitz
    It's to the credit of Anthony, who wrote and edited as well as directed, and his cinematographer Corey Hughes, that you come away thinking about parts of the film that felt like cut-able digressions and undergraduate musings when you were watching them.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Matt Zoller Seitz
    There's no denying that Cruella is stylish and kinetic, with a nasty edge that's unusual for a recent Disney live-action feature. But it's also exhausting, disorganized, and frustratingly inert, considering how hard it works to assure you that it's thrilling and cheeky.

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