For 281 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Allen's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Cunningham
Lowest review score: 0 DriverX
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 68 out of 281
281 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    Though it starts with promise, Spiderhead is pseudo-heady sci-fi stuff that treats its most intriguing elements like an afterthought, and misses the opportunity to be a memorable oddity aside from its disappointments.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Allen
    Interceptor is about putting on a show, and Pataky has the muscular charisma to carry it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    Take away the cameos—in the recording booth, and animated on-screen—and you get something that's a little too close to the same old junk.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Nick Allen
    The Takedown works overtime to uphold the façade of heroic policing in the most generic way possible, for god knows what greater good.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 25 Nick Allen
    It's ambitious, but with such hand-holding dramatic direction and a dreary visual palette that never creates terror out of random corn stalks, it couldn’t be more dull.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Nick Allen
    It is too touch-and-go, too speculative about her life and mysterious death, to be of any genuine purpose.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    While this documentary from Alison Klayman can be insightful in taking us inside a phenomenon, its approach can be too broad, with filmmaking that relies on its own weaning sense of trendy.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Allen
    Even though it’s more of a vision board of what it could be, the film introduces a nifty premise that recalls not just “A Nightmare on Elm Street” but how that series was able to make multiple irresistible sequels. Choose or Die is also the rare mid-budget Netflix movie that gets better and better as it goes along, owning its weirdness and not playing it easy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    Tony Hawk: Until the Wheels Fall Off shines brightest when it resembles something like the Alex Honnold free-climbing documentary "Free Solo," honing in on Hawk's episodes of hard-earned failure, of slamming his body to the ground countless times and getting back on the board.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Nick Allen
    With fascinating confidence, “See You Then” honors the gradual evolution of a long talk, so much that their literal pacing reads as its only unnatural flourish—they take several minutes to walk about two blocks. But that rhythm, of one step at a time, nearly takes on a hypnotic effect.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    Moonshot is the kind of movie that’s frustrating because of what makes it endearing—there’s so much that makes you wish it were more original. No rom-com set in space should feel this ordinary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Allen
    7 Days has an overall sweetness that keeps it charismatic for its 85-minute runtime, with an agile directorial eye that makes sure the back-and-forth scenes of them talking have enough life in them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    They’ve shared home movies previously, but this documentary—meaningful in concept, but fleeting in its expression—puts them in close-up, with Gainsbourg behind the camera in her debut.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Allen
    When this time travel story is at its best, it gives Reynolds space to convey the frustration one can have about their past, including when facing their younger self. The movie doesn’t fill out this concept with too much imagination about time travel or villains, but it does wind up with a powerful parable about healing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 67 Nick Allen
    While its minimalism can make for a mixed bag of surprises, “Killing Ground” director Damien Power ensures that No Exit has enough of his own striking signature.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    Studio 666 is the kind of broad horror-comedy that could certainly stand to be a little scarier, a little funnier, and more clever overall. But then again, no other horror-comedy stars rock band the Foo Fighters as themselves, which is the main pull for this special Foovie event.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    There’s so much going on in Three Months, so many emotional pieces in motion, but very little of it is particularly moving.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    This movie has Jeunet doing “The Jetsons” while ruminating on what a robot uprising might inevitably look like, but that proves to be less exciting than one could ever imagine.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Nick Allen
    Jenny Slate and Charlie Day deserve better than “I Want You Back,” a leaden rom-com that gives them a shot at being funny, charming, and sweet, only to squander it scene by scene.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Nick Allen
    Co-written with Harald Kloser and Spencer Cohen, “Moonfall” is a lumbering, long locomotive of one cliche attached to another, making time pass slowly even though there is so much juggling of these different one-dimensional relationships.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    The Wasteland is the unique case of a horror movie with a more robust visual sense than a lot of its contemporaries, but that still doesn’t create a larger terror. It’s more the stuff of directors' reels, not nightmares.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    There’s incredible merit in the action seen in “The Matrix Resurrections,” but those aren’t the elements that free the mind of the medium like bold storytelling, like “The Matrix” preached and then became a game-changing classic, only to become a docket for satisfying shareholders. Blue pill or red pill? It doesn’t matter anymore; they’re both placebos.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 Nick Allen
    As the overly long movie becomes about 130 minutes of his own propaganda, Washington romanticizes an ideal of man that has never actually existed, instead of a human being who did.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Nick Allen
    A disastrous movie, Don’t Look Up shows McKay as the most out of touch he’s ever been with what is clever, or how to get his audience to care.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Nick Allen
    The extremes uncovered in this film become revealing of what we accept as necessary, in what we as a nation rationalize as justice even without procedure. It is eye-opening, and yet also like Gibney’s best work, affirming in the worst ways.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Nick Allen
    Try Harder! is a charming dark comedy with a light touch, with part of its self-deprecating humor right there in the title.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Nick Allen
    8-Bit Christmas may have a more grounded approach to gamer culture than you'd expect, but it’s constantly beat by its own limited imagination.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    There are endless horror movies out there in which a slow burn seems like it's just killing time before it's actually time to kill. But "The Feast" does well with that dread—it's the main course that proves to be the rip-off, however gory, indulgent, and horror-ready it is.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Nick Allen
    Mayor Pete has a compelling subject, but it's most gripping when it’s trying to secure your curiosity, not just your future vote.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Allen
    With its coming-of-age and its historical context, Beans concerns ideas of pain and conflict, but it’s too timid to really engage those ideas, to honor their discomfort aside from how horrific discrimination is (a few scenes of the family being ambushed by racist Canadian citizens are upsetting, but played too directly for tears).

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