For 840 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 30% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 15.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Schager's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 49
Highest review score: 100 Days of Heaven
Lowest review score: 0 Brother's Justice
Score distribution:
840 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Feels Good Man offers an inside peek at the internet’s growing ability to affect and shape modern society, which often makes the film a nightmare about extremism and technology.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Schager
    Even though Chatwin is only seen in a handful of snapshots and one brief video snippet, Herzog brings him to vivid life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Nick Schager
    Spike Lee’s documentary on this formative period in Michael Jackson’s career derives its electric, enlivening energy from these fantastic clips. Alas, they’re not enough to alter the fact that this non-fiction effort . . . is merely a nostalgic promotional puff piece meant to look back fondly, and uncritically, at an artist transitioning from a youth-oriented pop fad to the biggest star in the world.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    More than the film’s activist message, however, it’s writer-director Tommy Avallone’s portrait of whatever-it-takes parental risk and sacrifice that will help it resonate with audiences no matter their views on marijuana.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    With vibrantly expressive aesthetics that match the energy of its defiant and distressed heroine, this impressive coming-of-age indie . . . heralds the arrival of both a distinctive new filmmaking voice and a leading lady with charisma to burn.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Schager
    No amount of marquee talent, however, can fully compensate for the inert melodrama peddled by this inspired-by-true-events film
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    “You think you’re in the movies or something?” crows Davi’s Genovese to an underling, but Mob Town’s wink-wink address of its own artificiality doesn’t excuse its inept execution, which extends to a stereotypical Italian score by Lionel Cohen.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    The film’s finely crafted serenity is in keeping with its main character’s secluded state of affairs, and mind.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    In “Feast of the Epiphany,” a narrative-documentary hybrid, the line between fiction and reality is demarcated quite clearly, even as those two modes remain in constant dialogue — and the conceit is entrancing precisely because of its elusiveness.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    Unfortunately, the invention on display is of a helter-skelter variety, as Samantha Buck and Marie Schlingmann’s film so madly lurches about in search of a tone that it feels like the first draft of a gonzo faux-biopic.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    A biographical portrait that doubles as an origin story for today’s amoral political landscape, its marriage of incisiveness and timeliness should make it an indie hit this fall.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    Waltrip’s earnest and forthright narration lends Blink of an Eye its intimacy and insight.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Schager
    Bolstered by the writer-director’s own journey, recounted via a collage-like aesthetic that eloquently conveys his circumscribed condition, it’s a nonfiction study of artistic creation and, also, of individual courage and perseverance.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    Laced with white-savior undertones this vaguely “The Blind Side”-esque sports drama doesn’t bother investigating (if it recognizes them at all), Overcomer offers nothing in the way of nuance — even its title is awkward — and, also, no respite from its religious propagandizing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Schager
    Angels Are Made of Light serves as a lament for a prosperous past that can’t be reclaimed, a volatile present that affords few prospects for joy or success, and a future that’s terrifyingly uncertain.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Mixing archival photos and TV footage with straightforward to-the-camera remembrances, Greenfield-Sanders’ deft structural approach isn’t as daring as those found in Morrison’s own work.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    As highlighted by its pitch-perfect finale, South Mountain demonstrates a realistically complex conception of stock ideas like “vengeance,” “moving on” and “healing,” and Ethan Mass’s cinematography echoes the material’s dualities in its delicate interplay of light and dark. Guiding the material from start to finish, however, is Balsam.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Schager
    Chuck Smith’s documentary is at once accessible and formally daring, echoing its subject’s style while simultaneously celebrating her radical achievements. It’s an enlightening nonfiction portrait of a feminist pioneer that, in this #MeToo era, should strike a timely chord.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Eden-Smith makes the film her own, right up to the surprising, challenging and altogether sharp final note.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    As a literal origin story about how we live today, it’s a captivating history lesson with global appeal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    [A] winning film ... Genre fans won’t want to miss it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Those familiar with this story won’t find any novel twists here, but Krauss astutely conveys the literal and moral quagmires produced by such military situations.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    The aesthetic devices used by the directors to embellish their material — including educational and archival videos, split-screens, slow-motion, time-lapse footage, and lingering close-ups of needles and money — are a bit too self-consciously stylish for their own good. Nonetheless, their film captures the recurring nightmare of substance abuse.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    dreary...Bright, crude and aggressively hackneyed, director Nacho G. Velilla’s follow-up prizes energy over originality. While its humor elicits far more eye-rolls than laughs — and will thus leave franchise newbies cold — its high-octane style should appeal to fans of the first film.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    The film moves along lackadaisically, without any knack for establishing scenarios, or setting up punchlines, that might lead to laughs — which, in turn, often makes it play like an enervating drama. Bruce!!!! makes a lot of verbal noise, but it says nothing worth remembering.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Monaghan radiates a winning measure of defiant resilience and dignity, even when she and her illustrious co-stars are reduced to mouthpieces for political sentiments (as in Common’s censure of ICE) — which is depressingly often.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    By consigning its most interesting character to a supporting role, this amiable slice of fictionalized history loses a good deal of its heft. Nonetheless, solid direction and a charming Berkeley turn help it stave off insubstantiality.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Schager
    A movie about cancer has no right to be as consistently amusing as Paddleton — a triumph for which credit should be spread around, even if it most deservedly goes to Ray Romano.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Schager
    Portraits of institutional dysfunction don’t come much more urgent, and quietly bleak, than this.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    A testament to its maker’s staunch belief in the cause of shark preservation, it’s a plea for transparency and conservation whose gorgeous 4K cinematography should make it an enticing proposition for nonfiction cinephiles and activists alike.

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