For 863 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 30% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 15.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Nick Schager's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 49
Highest review score: 100 Days of Heaven
Lowest review score: 0 I Send You This Place
Score distribution:
863 movie reviews
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    Everything and everyone lurches about in a desperate bid to be hilariously weird, and the effect is to make the proceedings feel hopelessly strained, as if they know that there’s nothing funny going on and thus must compensate via out-there quirkiness and constant mugging.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    The Sky Is Everywhere finds director Josephine Decker indulging in affectation overload in an effort to imbue her adaptation of Jandy Nelson’s young-adult novel with uplifting magic. Whereas individual moments might work on their own, however, the “Madeline’s Madeline” auteur’s latest never provides its romantic tale with room to breathe, so intent is it about operating with maximum whimsicality.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    Designed for maximum corniness, The Tiger Rising peppers its action with enough references to God, upturned-to-the-heavens gazes and warm enveloping light to make clear its function as a homily.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Handsomely mounted and deftly dramatized, it’s an agonized study of suffering and treachery, and no less valuable — or powerful — for being regrettably familiar.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    In any decade, the film’s bevy of unexplained details, dropped subplots, paper-thin characterizations and fright-free mayhem would disappoint.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    While following a typical rom-com pattern isn’t inherently unpleasant, the movie’s wink-wink insinuations that it’s going to take things in a novel direction, followed by its embrace of the very clichés it’s poked fun at, makes it feel disingenuous and stale.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Nick Schager
    Writer-director Michael Mohan’s film plays like rehashed leftovers cooked up for young viewers who’ve never seen any of its superior inspirations.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Rosenfield and Law are such a likable duo — he clownish and earnest in equally uninhibited fashion, she brazen and fierce with an underlying sweetness — that the film remains amusing and spry even as it coasts along a path that will feel familiar to most rom-com fans.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    Obvious and derivative in borderline-shameless fashion, it’s a B-movie knock-off with little originality and even less flair.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Aided by Steven Price’s enthusiastic score, Mendoza’s vigorous direction keeps things speeding along, and Momoa is such a charismatic presence — whether sensitively interacting with Rachel (skillfully embodied by Merced) or inventively snapping an adversary’s neck — that the proceedings’ lack of realism works to its advantage.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    The film is formally beautiful almost to a fault, giving it a schematic quality that’s at odds with its roiling emotions.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    Fully Realized Humans solidifies its central dynamic through alternately jokey and heartfelt dialogue that rings true, and via its leads’ sure-footed performances as committed partners grappling with a crazed stew of issues involving control, doubt and masculinity.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Nick Schager
    It strikes not a single authentic chord, and that also goes for the lead performance of Ben Platt, whose overdone theater-kid turn further dooms the material’s stabs at humor and pathos.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    With low stakes and even lower energy, writer-director Maria Bissell’s feature debut isn’t sure if it’s a thriller with amusing elements or a comedy of criminal absurdity. What it winds up being, therefore, is neither, stuck in a dull middle ground that will please no one.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    While The God Committee routinely resides on the precipice of preachiness, Stark’s script (via St. Germain’s source material) avoids one-note sermonizing and characterizations at most turns, instead maturely investigating the messy intersection of medicine, morality and commerce.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Nick Schager
    A lively saga about a young coding wizard who’s charged with saving his family’s gaming business, this celebration of old- and new-school creativity doesn’t break novel ground in any respect. Fortunately, though, its good humor, spry pacing and likable performances should appeal to its pre-high-school target audience.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Nick Schager
    Despite having characters incessantly explain key plot points, Separation lacks basic logic.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    Aiming for a darkly humorous portrait of marital bliss — and the difficulties of maintaining it — the film comes off as a half-formed “Twilight Zone” joke minus the punchline.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    With sterling command of its malevolently dreamy tone, it casts a disquieting spell.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Schager
    Boogie is most assured when focusing on specific Chinese American routines, rituals and mindsets, yet it falters when crafting its larger portrait of Boogie’s predicament. Huang’s script routinely indulges in leaden exposition to get its message, as well as character details and dynamics, across.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    A portrait of life’s impermanence, it’s a bittersweet small-scale saga whose occasional sluggishness is offset by its sensitivity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    Feels Good Man offers an inside peek at the internet’s growing ability to affect and shape modern society, which often makes the film a nightmare about extremism and technology.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Nick Schager
    Even though Chatwin is only seen in a handful of snapshots and one brief video snippet, Herzog brings him to vivid life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Nick Schager
    Spike Lee’s documentary on this formative period in Michael Jackson’s career derives its electric, enlivening energy from these fantastic clips. Alas, they’re not enough to alter the fact that this non-fiction effort . . . is merely a nostalgic promotional puff piece meant to look back fondly, and uncritically, at an artist transitioning from a youth-oriented pop fad to the biggest star in the world.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    More than the film’s activist message, however, it’s writer-director Tommy Avallone’s portrait of whatever-it-takes parental risk and sacrifice that will help it resonate with audiences no matter their views on marijuana.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    With vibrantly expressive aesthetics that match the energy of its defiant and distressed heroine, this impressive coming-of-age indie . . . heralds the arrival of both a distinctive new filmmaking voice and a leading lady with charisma to burn.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Nick Schager
    No amount of marquee talent, however, can fully compensate for the inert melodrama peddled by this inspired-by-true-events film
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Nick Schager
    “You think you’re in the movies or something?” crows Davi’s Genovese to an underling, but Mob Town’s wink-wink address of its own artificiality doesn’t excuse its inept execution, which extends to a stereotypical Italian score by Lionel Cohen.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Nick Schager
    The film’s finely crafted serenity is in keeping with its main character’s secluded state of affairs, and mind.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Nick Schager
    In “Feast of the Epiphany,” a narrative-documentary hybrid, the line between fiction and reality is demarcated quite clearly, even as those two modes remain in constant dialogue — and the conceit is entrancing precisely because of its elusiveness.

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