For 440 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The Salesman
Lowest review score: 12 The Man on Her Mind
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 57 out of 440
440 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Drawing on the memories of family members, friends, and collaborators, and tapping into a trove of archival material, including tapes of James’s raucous, raunchy live shows, Jenkins keeps pace with his subject’s breakneck progress. Along the way James encounters opportunities that are missed or exploited and tragedies that are averted or courted. He transforms hard times into artistic success, and squanders success in debauchery.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    White Noise is an expertly edited, four-year immersion into a phenomenon that has shaped the volatile politics of our time. It’s an auspicious debut for both Lombroso and The Atlantic, and its intimate and empathetic approach might be a more potent way of countering those who promote such toxic ideas than blunting confrontation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The lawyers in the film are compared to superheroes, to David and Goliath. But they know their efforts are not enough.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Will print books ultimately disappear, replaced by digital versions? The ever-entertaining and insightful Fran Lebowitz offers anecdotal evidence to the contrary. She notes that on the subway she sees many people in their 20s reading actual books. So perhaps there is hope a new generation will revive the bound medium.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The experience of watching Crip Camp might inspire you to reexamine your attitudes about disabled people and how society treats them. Though occasionally sentimental and preachy, it is an essential reminder of a civil-rights struggle that many have forgotten and a cause that has yet to be fully achieved.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    “[Dance] gives you nothing back,” says Cage. “No manuscripts to store away, no paintings to show on walls and maybe hang in museums, no poems to be printed and sold, nothing but that single fleeting moment when you feel alive.” Kovgan’s film comes close to capturing that moment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Anchoring this diverting, disparate collage are interviews with those who still believe in Van Tassel’s faith and message.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    After watching the movie, its relentlessly catchy numbers might keep playing for you; as one of the interviewees says, “You’ll be singing these songs for the rest of your life, whether you like it or not.”
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Similar to Joshua Oppenheimer’s “The Look of Silence” (2014) in its confrontation with those implicated in past crimes, Wang’s film differs in that many of her subjects are both victims and perpetrators.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Argott and Joyce subordinate these more pressing political questions to a mirror-box exploration of the nature of truth and the unfathomable secrets of the soul. As such it is thoughtful, sometimes ingenious, but you can’t help thinking that they missed the real story.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    The best part of Ron Howard’s long-winded and fitfully moving Pavarotti occurs at the beginning with footage from 1995 of the world-famous tenor — who died in 2007, at 71 — visiting an opera house built in the middle of the Amazon jungle. The legend has it that Enrico Caruso had performed there 100 years before.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    [A] peripatetic and ultimately poignant documentary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Never has space travel looked so sordid, debased, mean-spirited, or crummy, qualities intensified by the (intentionally) ugliest cinematography ever — except for the close-ups of faces — from the great Agnès Godard, Denis’s longtime collaborator. But seldom has space travel served as such an eloquent and tragic representation of the human condition.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Oblique, often beguiling, and portentously cryptic.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    These men tend to be laconic, tormented, tattooed, impenetrable, usually bearded, potentially or actively violent, with screwed-up families and traumatic pasts. Nothing that a good horse couldn’t cure, or a talented female director.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    There are only two moments in Jia Zhang-Ke’s obliquely epic mobster (or “jianghu”) movie Ash Is Purest White when a gun goes off. Unlike the shots fired in Hollywood movies, these have consequences. As in many of the films Jia has made since his 1997 Bressonian debut, “Xiao Wu,” petty choices prove fateful and marginal lives are swept up by seismic social change.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Neither dense, distracting makeup nor confused, convoluted chronology can disguise the fact that Karyn Kusama’s Destroyer, scripted by Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi, is a mediocre mash-up of genre clichés.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Von Trotta comes closest to the object of her search when she looks at images from his movies. Especially images of the seashore.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Dava Whisenant’s documentary, Bathtubs Over Broadway, offers a glimpse into a world few are aware of: industrial musicals — Broadway-style productions similar to Broadway shows except that they promote products like bathtub fixtures, surgical supplies, and John Deere tractors. They were performed exclusively for company members, sometimes recorded or filmed, then forgotten.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Schnabel tries to re-create van Gogh’s inner workings during the intense last two years of his life — his point of view and his way of looking at the world that resulted in the masterpieces that have since become invaluable investment commodities.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Everett draws effectively from Wilde’s own writings and witticisms.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Westmoreland’s narrative is cluttered with undeveloped subplots and loose ends. He compensates by evoking the era with images drawing from painters like Gustave Caillebotte and Toulouse-Lautrec and soundtrack music that ranges from Strauss-like waltzes to Erik Satie’s “Gymnopédies.”
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The Captain pretends to be a serious movie about the banality of evil; sometimes, despite itself, it is.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    There is a fair share of such Betty White-ish feistiness on display, but the pathos creeps in unexpectedly.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Reed follows the proceedings as they happen and builds the suspense of a top-notch courtroom drama.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    As for Drucker and Ménochet, they vividly embody the roles of abuser and victim but have little else to work with.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Murky, clunky, but sometimes nihilistically exhilarating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though not as graphically powerful as other documentaries on similar subjects, such as Fredrick Wiseman’s “Meat” (1976) or Georges Franju’s “Les Sang des Bête” (1949), the emphasis on the disastrous global impact of these practices is more disturbing .
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In this semi-autobiographical period piece, Simón achieves the rare feat of faithfully recreating the mysterious consciousness of a child. Though her techniques can get repetitive and stall the narrative, more often than not her elliptical editing recreates an innocent’s perception of the slow drift of time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In his three-decade run, Rogers touched millions of souls. But the film is honest in questioning whether, in the end, he really made a difference.

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