For 420 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Coming Home
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 56 out of 420
420 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Everett draws effectively from Wilde’s own writings and witticisms.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Westmoreland’s narrative is cluttered with undeveloped subplots and loose ends. He compensates by evoking the era with images drawing from painters like Gustave Caillebotte and Toulouse-Lautrec and soundtrack music that ranges from Strauss-like waltzes to Erik Satie’s “Gymnopédies.”
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The Captain pretends to be a serious movie about the banality of evil; sometimes, despite itself, it is.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    There is a fair share of such Betty White-ish feistiness on display, but the pathos creeps in unexpectedly.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Reed follows the proceedings as they happen and builds the suspense of a top-notch courtroom drama.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    As for Drucker and Ménochet, they vividly embody the roles of abuser and victim but have little else to work with.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Murky, clunky, but sometimes nihilistically exhilarating.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Though not as graphically powerful as other documentaries on similar subjects, such as Fredrick Wiseman’s “Meat” (1976) or Georges Franju’s “Les Sang des Bête” (1949), the emphasis on the disastrous global impact of these practices is more disturbing .
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In this semi-autobiographical period piece, Simón achieves the rare feat of faithfully recreating the mysterious consciousness of a child. Though her techniques can get repetitive and stall the narrative, more often than not her elliptical editing recreates an innocent’s perception of the slow drift of time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    In his three-decade run, Rogers touched millions of souls. But the film is honest in questioning whether, in the end, he really made a difference.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Though sometimes it seems like a promotional video, the film offers a glimpse into the vagaries of class, culture, celebrity, and social mores since the hotel was first established back in 1930.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Perhaps that is Roskam’s ultimate point: volition and individuality are illusory; only love and death matter. That truth comes through with somber clarity in the film’s eloquent coda, which almost makes up for the silliness that precedes it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Ronit’s ebullient spirit spreads vivacity, discontent, and resentment. She offers the possibility of choice — between secular independence or religious tradition. But Lelio opts for an insipid neutrality that does a disservice to both.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Godard Mon Amour is very much like a Woody Allen film, with Godard embodying Allen’s negative traits of pretentiousness, neurosis, and misogyny without the redeeming virtue of humor.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    Chloé Zhao’s The Rider achieves what cinema is capable of at its best: It reproduces a world with such acuteness, fidelity, and empathy that it transcends the mundane and touches on the universal.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Perhaps Fiennes’s intent is to draw the viewer into the solipsistic intensity of what it is to be Grace Jones. It is a bracing experience, because she is hedonistic, exultant, funny, and fierce.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Sarnet elevates his Rabelaisian folktale into a tragedy illustrated by haunting, metaphorical imagery.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    After watching David Douglas and Drew Fellman’s visually spectacular, technically amazing, and occasionally cutesy documentary, Pandas, you’d think that IMAX 3-D was invented solely for close-ups of adorable panda cubs, their giant doleful, domino faces peering out with cuddly curiosity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    The clichéd dialogue, stereotypical characters (except for Toby Jones, who distinguishes himself as the wryly incompetent company cook), and the constrained setting (it takes place almost entirely in the officers’ dugout) deadens the suspense and diminishes the mood of dread endured by those awaiting their doom.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    At a time when financial regulations have been gutted, stock market indexes reel, and trade wars threaten, Jed Rothstein’s slick and revealing documentary The China Hustle should only add to the anxiety and gloom.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    If anything, Chernick’s film shows a life that may be too perfect. In addition to his triumphant career, Perlman has a seemingly ideal marriage — to Toby, a woman who is his match in ebullience, wit, and passion for art and music. It has lasted for more than 50 years.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Beautifully photographed, well composed, but disappointingly superficial.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The message is clear, if not original: stray from the herd and you’re dead. What makes Hirayanagi’s iteration of this familiar theme appealing are the quirky characters, the nuanced performances, and the curious cultural topography of Tokyo.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    As a portfolio of visionary images of surreal landscapes and hallucinatory flora and fauna, the movie sometimes dazzles. But as a metaphorical narrative, it often fizzles.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A moody, mannered, and lingering coming-of-age story with a Stephen King-like twist.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    More than an hour passes before Khaled and Wikström’s stories intersect, and though it would be an exaggeration to say each redeems the other, in this film the other side of hope is not despair, but decency.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Sharif is a paragon of decency and endurance, but his camera skills are limited and often constrained by circumstances. For the most part this roughness reflects the raw immediacy of the experience.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Channeling Nye’s own gift for making complex ideas simple and clear, the filmmakers edit together these various aspects of Nye’s life with deceptive ease, drawing on interviews and archival material and following him throughout his hectic schedule. This is not hagiography, however; they don’t back off from examining some of his more controversial endeavors and characteristics. That includes his fondness for the spotlight and his ambition, which in a couple of instances has backfired on him.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Though he might be uncertain about sex, or even kissing and cuddling, Scott is an incurable romantic. And steadfastly loyal and kind. The value of that is made clear when the filmmakers disclose the full tragedy and horror of what Dina has gone through, and when he sings to her “Before the Next Teardrop Falls.”
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    The film confronts not just the expected issue of environmentalism but also explores themes of survival, separation, loss, and death.

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