For 432 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Keough's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Manuscripts Don't Burn
Lowest review score: 12 Hell Baby
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 57 out of 432
432 movie reviews
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Greer and Lyonne play off each other well; the combination of readily corruptible innocence and reluctantly innocent corruption elevate the material. Their badinage and interactions suggest a genuine sisterly relationship, with a long history of resentments, betrayals, and co-dependence. Too bad the filmmakers try too hard at making you laugh, and not hard enough at making you feel.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Peter Keough
    Shot in a rich palette, the film does provide diversion with some of its funkily detailed sets and supporting actors.... Otherwise, the film distinguishes itself for its miscasting and misuse of its cast.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    This is no exercise in miserabilism. Instead Moverman and Gere take a problem and elevate it into a universal experience, turning social issues into existential insights.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Lawrence is an impeccable, commanding subject, not just because of his credentials but because of his presence and demeanor.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Some of Tarantino’s taste for brutish resolutions seems to have slipped into her otherwise nuanced, sensitive, and unflinching adaptation of this YA novel by French author Anne-Sophie Brasme.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Barber, who directed the neglected, unabashedly satisfying vigilante thriller “Harry Brown” knows how to get the blood pumping and stoke an audience’s craving for righteousness, vengeance, and vicarious sadism. What he lacks is the woman’s touch, if by that one means nuance, ambiguity, and empathy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Keough
    After a period of creative drought, Zhang’s homecoming is a cause for celebration.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    The movie, though, is not so good. If it came down to acting instead of chess, we might have lost the Cold War.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Peter Keough
    Roland Emmerich’s Stonewall reduces these events to a backdrop for caricatures that were already passé in William Friedkin’s “The Boys in the Band” (1970).
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    The film veers from farce to tragedy and relates a twisted variation on the American Dream.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A kitchen, a guestroom, and swimming pool become battlegrounds. Though hardly revolutionary, “Mother” subverts conventions — both cinematic and social.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Güeros is brutal, ironic, madcap, and grim. Shot by Damian Garcia in black-and-white with the pristine spontaneity of Godard’s cinematographer Raoul Coutard, it is “Bande à part” (1964) meets “Los Olvidados” (1950).
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    What Meet the Patels could use is a little more meat.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    It takes a woman to make a great film about the all-male bastion of the French Foreign Legion. Claire Denis did so in her elliptical desert updating of Herman Melville’s “Billy Budd” in “Beau Travail” (1999), and her fellow French director Sarah Leonor nearly equals that feat in The Great Man.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    More conventional in approach than Linklater’s 12-year filmmaking odyssey, “Identity” demonstrates its boldness not with stylistic originality but with political acuity.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    It consists of a series of episodic encounters, misadventures, and musings redeemed in part by the presence of two scenic wonders, the unspoiled 2,190-mile grandeur of the Appalachian Trail and the spectacular crapulousness of Nick Nolte.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Much of Meru is about that second attempt, filmed with such grandeur and intimacy that sometimes attempting to figure out how they made the incredible shots almost spoils them.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Like her subject, Kempner’s film doesn’t try to be flashy or stylish. She adheres to the Ken Burns school of old footage, photos, period ads, newspaper stories and cartoons.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    A fascination with serendipity, irony, and absurdity like that in Werner Herzog’s documentaries propels “Friends” into unexpected territory.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    No Escape is a tense but utterly predictable exercise in Western xenophobic paranoia and guilt.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    F. Gary Gray’s Straight Outta Compton starts out strong, peaks quickly, and then gets tangled in complications and compromise and falls apart.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    Religious allusions aside, Alleluia is like “Psycho” combined with “Bonnie and Clyde,” with Norman and Norma Bates as the conjoined criminal couple on the run.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Peter Keough
    Unfortunately, the material flounders from the broadly farcical to the bombastically melodramatic. Race and ethnicity aren’t so much the problem as gender is. Despite Gainsbourg’s efforts, her character becomes a caricature.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    In addition to directing outstanding performances, Edgerton also suggests psychological processes by means of space, architecture, and décor, exploiting the walls, doorways, windows, and mirrors of the new house to indicate the status of a relationship or self-image.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Like a great silent movie, it creates its pathos and comedy out of the concrete objects being animated, building elaborate gags involving everyday items transformed into Rube Goldberg devices that sometimes entrap the characters, or, when properly manipulated by them, provide a means of achieving their goals.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    In the end, this feeble effort remains tainted, however unfairly, by the creator’s personal life. Maybe Allen should have titled it “Rationalizing Man.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Peter Keough
    Will miracles never cease? Alas, they do. Pausing pregnantly between clauses to add to their trite profundity, Quentin recites the moral of the story, and it’s as phony as the towns of the title.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    David Sedaris contributes a story about talking to a hotel clerk over the phone, which doesn’t add much to the discussion but is very funny.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Peter Keough
    Though the outcome is a matter of public record, it still unfolds like a suspenseful tragedy. Suffice it to say that the wheels of justice turn slowly, but they grind exceedingly fine.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Peter Keough
    This walkabout ends less dramatically and not as tragically as the one in Roeg’s film, but perhaps with a greater poignancy. And Gulpilil, four decades of hard living later, is as magnificent as ever.

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