Vikram Murthi

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For 39 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 63% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Vikram Murthi's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Amazing Grace
Lowest review score: 33 Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 20 out of 39
  2. Negative: 3 out of 39
39 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Vikram Murthi
    The footage astounds, but the competing contextualizations breathe new life into the experiment, especially when Lindeen allows the surviving members free reign to confront past emotions.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    The Last Black Man plays like a poetic portrait, part tender ode and part cartography of lived experience, bringing a nuanced and hard-earned perspective to the screen.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Vikram Murthi
    The Biggest Little Farm has many valuable points to make about the connection between how our food is grown and eco-friendly living, but style betrays substance so often here that the message gets lost in the shuffle. Unless that message is simply We Bought A Farm!
    • 46 Metascore
    • 42 Vikram Murthi
    The story never even grazes the sublime; it’s dull and banal, coasting on familiarity from beginning to end. Here, the clichés don’t celebrate a reunion. They’re at war.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Vikram Murthi
    One of the great performances of the 20th century.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Vikram Murthi
    It plays like a compelling, genre-inflected advertisement for the Indian tourism board, even as Winterbottom toils in the country’s seedy underbelly.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Vikram Murthi
    Alita works as spectacle, but there’s so much conspiring against that endgame that its best moments hardly feel worth it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 58 Vikram Murthi
    When it’s all said and done, however, the whole thing just feels a little tired.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 33 Vikram Murthi
    The vast majority of the people watching The Brink have their minds made up about Bannon and will not be swayed by his flamboyant rhetoric. At the same time, it’s difficult to pinpoint what exactly Klayman accomplishes with her film beyond a mere political horror show one can safely view from behind proverbial Plexiglas.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Vikram Murthi
    The Kid Who Would Be King’s arrhythmic pacing proves to be a liability, particularly in the homestretch when Cornish establishes three separate endings and decides to power through all of them
    • 40 Metascore
    • 67 Vikram Murthi
    Zemeckis has crafted a work that may be dismissed and forgotten by the general public, but will inevitably remain a curiosity for cinephiles and auteurists everywhere. Not a bad feat for a guy embarking upon the fourth decade of his career.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Vikram Murthi
    Bumblebee may sport a thoughtful character arc and a throwback vibe, but it’s not meaningfully different than the other five entries in the Transformers series. There’s still plenty of laughably stupid junk to wade through in order to find the good bits.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Vikram Murthi
    Ultimately, there’s just too much extra baggage for Mary Poppins Returns to soar to great heights.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Vikram Murthi
    Spider-Verse feels fresh precisely because it breathes new life into an old story without abandoning the basics.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Vikram Murthi
    Tyrel is essentially Microaggressions: The Movie.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 33 Vikram Murthi
    It’s sad that Fantastic Beasts pulls off what I assumed was impossible: It turned an imaginative fantasy world into dreary wallpaper.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Vikram Murthi
    The original "Shirkers" might be a product of a bygone era of pop culture, but its new nonfiction form scans as a second attempt to reach those fellow weirdos who are desperate to make something real, established structures be damned.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Vikram Murthi
    It’s just a shame that the edge-of-your-seat suspense negates The Kindergarten Teacher’s preceding psychological power.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 42 Vikram Murthi
    It’s a cliché to praise a film by saying that an actor “is having fun” on screen, but Hardy having fun with a weirdly bland character and his absurd, sassy alter ego goes a long way to giving Venom a reason to exist.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    As it stands, however, Free Solo still has plenty to offer in the edge-of-your-seat department.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Vikram Murthi
    Colette too frequently coasts on its timeliness, preferring catharsis to nuance.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Vikram Murthi
    Unfortunately, I Think We’re Alone Now stops being interesting right when Grace (Elle Fanning) comes to town, mostly because she brings screenwriter Mike Makowsky’s trite ideas about loneliness and community along with her.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    Individual scenes absorb, and the film lives and dies by its performances, but the macro problem seems to be that The Sisters Brothers can’t quite transcend its imitation atmosphere. Audiard and his cinematographer Benoît Debie nail the Western aesthetic, but neither can grasp the feeling. This wouldn’t be an issue if Audiard had postmodern aspirations, but The Sisters Brothers wants to be in conversation with the genre while still retaining a sincere, unwinking approach.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 83 Vikram Murthi
    It generates a sense of personal immediacy that elevates Minding The Gap above the confines of mere portraiture; his presence facilitates (and sometimes hinders) honest admissions from his subjects.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Vikram Murthi
    It’s everything and nothing at once.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    On Chesil Beach is a minor story by design, one that uses a lovers’ quarrel to interrogate evolving social values, but sometimes it’s the most minor stories that contain some of the most overlooked ideas.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Vikram Murthi
    Despite committed performances from most of the cast (especially Ejiofor, who imbues Pearson with a gentle yet stubborn spirit), Come Sunday can’t shake its middling script and perfunctory direction.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    By shaping Roxanne Roxanne as a character profile, Larnell accentuates his actors’ performances and crafts a nuanced community portrait, two strengths exhibited in his delightful first feature, "Cronies."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Vikram Murthi
    West of the Jordan River works best when Gitai involves himself in the interviews. Gitai is a compelling screen presence—empathetic and patient, but also skeptical and necessarily forceful.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    The Road Movie operates on a unique tonal wavelength, one that’s both manic and oddly comforting.

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