Vikram Murthi

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For 75 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 30% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 66% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1 point higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Vikram Murthi's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Amazing Grace
Lowest review score: 33 Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 41 out of 75
  2. Negative: 4 out of 75
75 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Vikram Murthi
    Everything from Peter and Emma’s inane backstories to their sweaty attempts to win back partners who were clearly not right for them in the first place mark this as a case of a creative team going through the motions. The ending hinges on a callback so obvious and manufactured that it provokes eye rolls, even as it slightly subverts expectations.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 42 Vikram Murthi
    Simply put, Swan Song would be dead on arrival without Ali’s dual performance, which manages to ground the film’s tearjerker premise in credible human emotion.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    Drive My Car effectively captures the double-edged nature of storytelling as a means of both processing and deflecting emotions; Uncle Vanya can be used to work through pain or to postpone it. Hamaguchi clearly recognizes film’s similar power.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 58 Vikram Murthi
    Aside from the Mexico City setting, it doesn’t really accomplish anything unique either. A Cop Movie feels in the end like, well, a cop movie, only with an eye for society instead of the unit. That’s not enough to separate it from the pack.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Vikram Murthi
    Haynes simply uses the tools at his disposal to get the job done. Ultimately, he captures the inspiring spirit of The Velvet Underground, a band built on the principle that marching to the beat of your own drum is a righteous, rebellious artistic act.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 33 Vikram Murthi
    Blue Bayou is designed to jerk tears out of a plainly tragic scenario, but all it does is expose the strings behind the puppets and the set. In the film’s failures, we can see the limits of good intentions: It doesn’t matter if a heart is in the right place if the mind isn’t too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Vikram Murthi
    Ahmed can’t sand over all of the flaws through sheer charisma. But with him at center, the movie is always watchable, even in its imperfections.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Vikram Murthi
    Franklin’s real life was obviously rife with drama worthy of the big screen, but Wilson and TV-trained director Liesl Tommy take a comprehensive, arrhythmic approach that treats major life events like soapy episodes or grist for the pop-psych mill.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    Val
    If you’re already a fan of Kilmer’s work, there’s clear value in watching him pal around as a young man on the brink of stardom or rehearse as Jim Morrison for The Doors. But for everyone else, Val can sometimes feel like an uncomplicated victory lap.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Vikram Murthi
    After 29 narrative features, Soderbergh has developed a proficient sense of staging that feels simultaneously relaxed and invigorating. Much of the ineffable fun of watching No Sudden Move comes from being in the hands of someone who knows how to achieve what they want without trying unduly hard to impress.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    If you’ve never heard of Sparks, the good news is that you’re the perfect viewer for Edgar Wright’s documentary The Sparks Brothers, a two-hours-plus sales pitch for why they’re worth your time.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Vikram Murthi
    A general menace permeates the film in the form of paranoid intrigue and clandestine government forces, but it’s always offset with plenty of offhand irony and snarky one-liners.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Vikram Murthi
    There’s plenty of complexity to be mined from a scenario in which perception carries more weight than the truth, but director Anthony Mandler, a music video and commercial veteran making his feature debut, takes a broad-strokes approach to Steve’s plight.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    Every object, many of them clearly worn by use, feels hand chosen; every shade of color feels handpicked; every piece of furniture or fabric feels specific to that room. Asili’s controlled design doesn’t render The Inheritance sterile. Instead, it swells with free-wheeling creativity and Black pride.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 42 Vikram Murthi
    One irony of Malcolm & Marie is that its vindictive bellyaching about judging a film on its own terms is much more interesting than the actual relationship at the center of the film. The performances remain trapped in a self-conscious mode, merely mimicking the cadence and tempo of a romance-fracturing fight.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    Sylvie’s Love lacks the ineffable spark that keeps it from fully transcending its period dress-up. There’s a pervasive self-consciousness on display that veers from delightful to forced depending on the goals of each scene. Sometimes the cast and the production design embrace the artifice strongly enough to make it look and sound organic. Other times, it just appears… artificial.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Vikram Murthi
    The simplicity of McQueen and Siddons’ screenplay is a feature, not a bug. More than any other film in Small Axe, Education resembles a kitchen sink drama in the vein of films from Mike Leigh or Ken Loach, where the political messaging remains crystal clear but is still filtered through personal narratives.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 91 Vikram Murthi
    Collective sports a procedural-like pace that keeps the information legible and the action linear.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Vikram Murthi
    Generally speaking, Red, White and Blue succeeds whenever the film deviates from the message and showcases spontaneous and unfettered life.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Vikram Murthi
    That Johnson mostly pulls this off through the lens of black comedy, without succumbing to outright miserabilism, is an achievement. May we all have the opportunity to be present at our own funerals, surrounded by loved ones, before it’s too late.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 83 Vikram Murthi
    The across-the-board stellar performances always invigorate every scene, but Mangrove frustrates whenever McQueen defaults to less rigorous visual strategies.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 91 Vikram Murthi
    The organic community portrait ebbs and flows to a beat of its own making.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Vikram Murthi
    It’s a film comprised of snapshots, glimpses from a hazy evening. But the Ross Brothers understand that these are the moments that paint people in their best, most unguarded light.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Vikram Murthi
    The result is an uneven paean to a man who deserves a more complicated portrait.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Vikram Murthi
    It’s First Cow’s buddy relationship that instills the film with a reserved, yet palpable emotional core.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Vikram Murthi
    Greed fails because it’s overstuffed with subplots and organized via a maddening time-hopping structure.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Vikram Murthi
    Despite their best efforts, Liam Neeson and Lesley Manville can’t rescue Ordinary Love, a bland drama about a late-middle-aged couple grappling with a cancer diagnosis.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Vikram Murthi
    Too often, The Gentlemen creaks through the motions of Ritchie’s patented vision, absent the spark necessary to bring his fast-paced action and profane zingers to life. It’s like watching a reunited band struggle to recapture the energy of its glory days.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 42 Vikram Murthi
    An insipid, boring mess, Three Christs doesn’t even have the decency to be amusing, apart from Stephen Root’s forced delivery of the film’s title followed by a what-a-world head shake.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Vikram Murthi
    To his credit, Lorentzen never guides the audience’s moral response, allowing us to make up our minds about the Ochoas on a scene-by-scene basis. He also provides ample rationale for their actions by depicting their hand-to-mouth lifestyle alongside the on-the-job drudgery.

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