For 450 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Wendy Ide's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Call Me by Your Name
Lowest review score: 20 Patrick
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 15 out of 450
450 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    While Luca might lack some of the dizzying inventiveness that marks out top-tier Pixar, it’s packed to the gills with charm.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Wendy Ide
    Rothwell uses the language of cinema – macro lens closeups, distortion, off-kilter framing and an evocative blend of sound design and score – to convey the autistic experience of the world.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 Wendy Ide
    The dismal dialogue wouldn’t matter quite so much if at least the action sequences delivered a few thrills, but the whole thing is so shoddily put together it looks as though it was edited with a strimmer.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Wendy Ide
    Wry rather than uproarious, it’s a little uneven at times. But Suleiman is a master of slow-burning, cumulative humour; this is the kind of comedy that creeps up on you.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Wendy Ide
    Levan Koguashvili evocatively captures the unpredictable crackle of tensions and the tacit loyalties between the men; all sweat and beer and maudlin machismo, although the atmosphere of the picture is rather more compelling than its somewhat workmanlike plot.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    Perhaps a more potent political statement is the way that Christopher Scott’s choreography claims and owns every square inch of the block. Reclaim the streets (with fabulous shoes and glorious Latin dance routines)!
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Wendy Ide
    Much of Catch The Fair One’s lean authenticity comes from the film’s star (and real-life boxer) Kali Reis, who also gets a story credit on this picture. It’s a propulsive watch but, in common with many of the missing-person stories which inspired it, finds more dead-ends than answers.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Wendy Ide
    The barrier between the real and the fictional encounters is increasingly permeable, as is the line between social norms and unacceptable behaviour, in this freewheeling, spontaneous voyage into the unknown.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Wendy Ide
    With its black and white characterisation, the film approaches its complex theme in a way which may seem a little too simplistic to be fully satisfying.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Wendy Ide
    As Ellie and Abbie respectively, Sophie Hawkshaw and Zoe Terakes make light work of a somewhat heavy-handed screenplay.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Wendy Ide
    Montages, seesawing Dutch tilts and profligate overuse of lighting gels fail to conceal the fact that the film’s writing doesn’t match the lure of the central idea.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Wendy Ide
    Was the persona 6ix9ine an act or a kind of addiction? Was he a professional troll – the Katie Hopkins of hardcore hip-hop – or a genius marketeer? This intriguing documentary fails to fully answer these questions, but it does shine a light on a particularly uneasy aspect of internet celebrity.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Wendy Ide
    Remarkable access and nerves of steel (on the part of both the subjects and of filmmaker Hogir Hirori) makes for a riveting documentary which is as tense as it is revealing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    It’s a blast.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Wendy Ide
    Kala Azar is something rather special. It’s foetid and atmospheric, a feral scavenger of a film which sniffs around its themes before sinking its teeth into the meat of a beasts’ eye view of the breakdown of civilisation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    This impressive Israeli feature debut from Ruthy Pribar stars a mesmerising Shira Haas.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    There are charismatic figures fronting the movement, but the real power comes from each of the many shared, sad stories from women whose lives were affected by the law.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    Lindon creates a portrait of first love which is fresh, honest and engaging.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    This feature debut from the Sydney-based writer and director Samuel Van Grinsven may tackle familiar material – gay coming-of-age stories are hardly uncommon – but it does so with a lustre and style that marks Van Grinsven out as a name to watch. Perhaps even more notable is Leach, a silky, feline presence who owns every moment that he’s on screen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Wendy Ide
    Comic actors Steve Zahn and Jillian Bell are uncharacteristically earnest in this achingly well-intentioned but thuddingly heavy-handed family drama.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    The directorial debut from David Oyelowo is a rewarding, (older) family-friendly adventure which packs some crisply executed moments of nail-biting peril into a moving story which deals with grief, loss and newly forged friendships.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    This arresting first feature blends sci-fi and fantasy to create a worldview which is at once savagely grotesque and alarmingly familiar.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    What a joy is a documentary that neither talks down to its audience nor diminishes its subject.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Wendy Ide
    Tonally, with its extravagantly arched eyebrow and lacquered manicure of irony, this film feels oddly dated – a couple of decades out of step with current sensibilities. Were it not for Carey Mulligan’s Cassandra, an avenging angel in bubblegum-pink lip gloss, the picture may well have toppled off its stripper heels long before it got to stomp into its divisive shocker of a final act.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    Surface similarities to Groundhog Day are relegated to background noise, thanks to the crisp writing and the nihilistic bite of the humour.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Wendy Ide
    Timely as it is, this is a film which doesn’t always treat its female characters with the respect that one might hope for, certainly given that it is intended to expose exploitation rather than add to it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Wendy Ide
    As the story progresses, Bell’s decision to share the focus and to examine her relationship with her mother makes more sense, bringing an intimacy and tenderness to the rock documentary format.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Wendy Ide
    A screenplay which could have benefited from another pass undermines the credibility of what comes before, and, despite a formidable intensity from Riseborough throughout, leachs tension along with plausibility.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Wendy Ide
    As the detectives start to lose the plot, so does the film, fizzling into an unravelling tangle of loose ends.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Wendy Ide
    The film busts a gut attempting to free itself from the confines of the couple’s home. In this, it’s at least true to the spirit of lockdown, but it feels like a missed opportunity.

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