Joe Dever's Lone Wolf Console Edition Image
Metascore
79

Generally favorable reviews - based on 5 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.2

Mixed or average reviews- based on 19 Ratings

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  • Summary: Lone Wolf is back in video game form with a brand-new story and a deep combat system. Acclaimed author Joe Dever played an active role in the development of the game and his new narrative follows on from his classic 1980’s gamebook, shedding a new light on Lone Wolf’s world, Magnamund. TheLone Wolf is back in video game form with a brand-new story and a deep combat system. Acclaimed author Joe Dever played an active role in the development of the game and his new narrative follows on from his classic 1980’s gamebook, shedding a new light on Lone Wolf’s world, Magnamund. The Console Edition includes all 4 acts of the story. Are you ready to write your own destiny? Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 5
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 5
  3. Negative: 0 out of 5
  1. 80
    An enchanting, choose your own path style gamebook adventure, Joe Dever’s Lone Wolf does a commendable job of capturing the spirit of the series it’s based on while imbuing the proceedings with substantial amounts of longevity and a masterful degree of presentation.
  2. May 4, 2016
    80
    There's a great experience to be had here... Just make sure to take the proper steps needed to avoid the mid-game difficulty spike.
  3. 80
    Good stuff. Coupling a downbeat, grim pulp fantasy narrative with enough alternative routes that you'll want to play this a couple of times, and throwing in a combat system that fits on the PlayStation 4 like the most comfortable glove you've ever owned, Lone Wolf finds itself comfortably at home on console, and this more than makes up for my disappointment with the iPad original release.
  4. Apr 11, 2016
    80
    On Ps4, Joe Dever's Lone Wolf hasn't essentially changed from its PC version: story and style are just as solid as before. The graphics reveal the mobile origins of the game; furthermore, the game becomes less spontaneous by using a pad. However, Joe Dever's Lone Wolf sticks to its essence and still can intrigue many of those who are looking for a peculiar RPG.
  5. Mar 27, 2016
    77
    This is an original concept and, as long as you're happy spending a lot of time reading, we think it deserves a try. We've enjoyed what Joe Dever's Lone Wolf has to offer, but considering its uncommon nature, make sure you understand what the game is about before buying it.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Jul 29, 2016
    8
    For those of you who fondly remember the Fighting Fantasy style of gamebooks or spent time rolling characters in Dungeons and Dragons, thenFor those of you who fondly remember the Fighting Fantasy style of gamebooks or spent time rolling characters in Dungeons and Dragons, then this release may just stir up fond feelings of nostalgia.

    It's an interesting mix of mechanics, combining two art forms that would usually be considered at opposite ends of the spectrum--reading and gaming. The story is told over four main episodes, with each episode divided into four chapters, and broken up by third person, turn-based combat. You also have an inventory, character sheet and journal to refer to, allowing you to equip your character as you see fit; though, lacking the depth in your typical RPG.

    The story is well written and takes you through a variety of locations, offering player choice from time to time that will alter the stories narrative, or provide benefits in combat. Simple optional quests crop up in several of the episodes, leading to additional items, if you're so inclined. Each chapter also provides a merchant you can purchase, sell and upgrade equipment with, between encounters.

    Combat is straightforward, providing you with a variety of damage and status-effect attacks that you can employ as long as you have the endurance or magic required. A turn bar needs to refill, each time, before you can deploy these attacks, leaving you at the mercy of enemies in the meantime. There isn't a lot of variety in enemies, leading to escalating combinations of lesser and tougher enemies to contend with in later stages, making most battles an exercise in managing groups. It should be noted here that the game injects a few nasty difficulty spikes that risk halting progress completely--even on normal difficulty and with max levelled gear at the time; though, this can be avoided by taking the option to bump the difficulty down to easy.

    For people like myself that love books and gaming, this is a great match between old and new. If the idea of reading a story on your console, with some RPG-lite combat and moderate inventory management, isn't your thing then best to stick to more modern takes such as the Telltale series.
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