Amazon Studios | Release Date: October 12, 2018
7.0
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Generally favorable reviews based on 96 Ratings
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7
Brent_MarchantOct 20, 2018
While somewhat formulaic with a penchant for repetitiveness, this searing drama nevertheless makes its points about the perils of drug addiction and the pain of parents letting go of their adult children. What shines the most here, though,While somewhat formulaic with a penchant for repetitiveness, this searing drama nevertheless makes its points about the perils of drug addiction and the pain of parents letting go of their adult children. What shines the most here, though, are the heartfelt performance of Steve Carell and a riveting revelatory turn by Timothee Chalamet, a portrayal far better than his previous overrated work. In the end, "Beautiful Boy" doesn't break especially new ground cinematically or in its narrative, but it makes its point quite capably and does so with an effectiveness worthy of meritorious recognition. Expand
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8
hepwaOct 19, 2018
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. The beautiful boy in my life was named David and he lived with my friends and I for about a year in the late 90's. I was naive enough to think I knew what drugs he was taking and even more naive in thinking I could help him. He recovered and relapsed multiple times and then, about five years ago, and having fallen mostly out of touch, I read on Facebook that he died. It was terribly sad; a drug overdose that was likely suicide. David was handsome and funny and charmed everyone he would meet and I spent a great deal of time wondering why? How could someone with so many gifts choose self-destruction over and over again?

Living in Vancouver and familiar with the notorious East Side, observed occasionally from the confines of my vehicle, its almost unbearable to dwell on the tragedies and misfortune, broken hearts and broken families that populate Hastings and area. But to focus on how it makes me feel is obviously wrong. I don't have any skin in the game.

Tonight, I watched my most anticipated movie of the year, a valiant effort to dig into those tragedies, those broken families caught in the hurricane of drug addiction. Beautiful Boy is based on two memoirs (primarily "Beautiful Boy" by David Sheff, but also Nic Sheff's "Tweak") condensed by screenwriter Luke Davies and directed by Felix Van Groeningen. Those who follow such things might already know that the film underwent multiple edits to find its final rhythm and while it doesn't always succeed, I admire the director for tossing the Sid Field playbook and attempting to give the film a unique voice. An attentive audience won't get lost, but this subject matter isn't for everyone and I could understand why some might reject it.

The story of a privileged young man who succumbs to the grip of crystal meth addiction is terrifying and infuriating, often at the same time. It is easy to empathize with Steve Carrell's David Sheff, at his wits end and slowly realizing that he has to let go of his grown son and come to grips with the fact that the beautiful boy he knew is now a manipulative, selfish, lying thief who will tear his family apart in order to secure his next fix.

The issue with pacing that has been pointed out by others are slightly overblown, in my opinion, though the criticism of the film's music choices are easier to understand. I'm listening to Sufjan Stevens' "Carrie & Lowell" while writing this and imagining what he could have done with "Beautiful Boy"'s soundtrack like he did for Luca Guadanigno last year.

As an acting showcase, "Beautiful Boy" is a lopsided success. While Steve Carrell has some incredibly touching moments and you can genuinely feel his despair, there are moments where he might be in over his head as a performer. Unfortunately, he disappears in the presence of stronger actors, including Maura Tierney as his noble second wife.

Timothee Chalamet plays Nic Sheff, in a performance that certainly equals his best-of-the-decade work in "Call Me by Your Name" but this is as far from Elio Perlman as you could possibly be. While Elio learned to live with his pain, Nic Sheff learned to live within it, to crave it and surrender to its control of him.

Chalamet's gifts as an actor are just astonishing. Its like watching the severed power line at the end of "The Ice Storm" for two hours, crackling and twisting, fascinating and deadly. You don't learn to do this in acting class. I was already a huge fan. Now I'm just in awe.

And please stay all the way through the end credits. The first half features the song "Treasure" by Sampha but then segues into Chalamet's recitation of the Charles Bukowski poem "Let It Enfold You". It is staggeringly beautiful.
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7
TVJerryOct 30, 2018
This film is actually based on 2 best-sellers: one by the father (played by Steve Carell) and the other by the son (Timothee Chalamet). They both examine the heartbreaking cycle of addiction, relapse and recovery from their POVs. Since theThis film is actually based on 2 best-sellers: one by the father (played by Steve Carell) and the other by the son (Timothee Chalamet). They both examine the heartbreaking cycle of addiction, relapse and recovery from their POVs. Since the plot (which jumps freely in time) is steeped in frustration and misery, it's up to the actors to make this powerful relationship come to life. While Carell mostly plays it low-key, Chalamet creates a devastating, ultimately heartbreaking character. With the harsh re-creations of this cycle's repercussions, this experience is a relentless downer. It will be appreciated by those affected by addiction or lovers of compelling performances. NOTE: Stay thru the credits to hear the full Bukowski poem that's introduced earlier. Expand
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5
GreatMartinNov 2, 2018
Between the coming attraction trailer, the cast including a very already proven actor Steve Carell, an actor on the rise of a very admirable career ahead of him, Timothee Chalamet, after appearing in “Call Me By Your Name” and “Lady Bird", aBetween the coming attraction trailer, the cast including a very already proven actor Steve Carell, an actor on the rise of a very admirable career ahead of him, Timothee Chalamet, after appearing in “Call Me By Your Name” and “Lady Bird", a favorite underrated actress Maura Tierney and what looked like a strong story based on books written by the father and son, I really was expecting a lot more from “Beautiful Boy”.

The movie is about a father (Carell) who doesn't know what has happened to his beautiful boy (Chalament) who now a teenager is a hardcore drug addict. The father has no idea how to help his son or even what caused it and we, the audience, can only guess at the causes. Was it his parents getting a divorce when he was younger or is father remarrying? He seems to love his stepmother (Tierney) and the two kids she and his father have.

We see the father struggling to understand what drug addiction is all about and he is there to help his son no matter how far the latter goes down from stealing his kid brother’s hidden money, to quitting school, to shooting up until he winds up in the hospital from overdosing. We see the son getting sober and relapsing with the latter looked upon as a part of the cure.

Most of the scenes between the son and father are powerful, moving and affecting but they are constantly interrupted by the non-linear timeline along with vistas along the west coast of California and pictures of their home and the surrounding area that are more an advertisement for the tourist bureau than they add to the story. Each time we get into the nitty-gritty of the boy’s addiction, the problems it causes and the places it takes him to, the camera swings to scenes of the ocean, the waves coming ashore, endless roads or even a picture of the son, with his siblings, running under a lawn shower.

While many scenes are realistic there are 2 taking place in a restaurant where the two shouting at each other isn’t noticed by the help or other patrons. A brief romance with another addict, played by Kaitlyn Dever, grabs the audience’s attention only to be forgotten about within minutes.

The 2-hour movie directed by Felix Van Groeningen, who also wrote the screenplay with Luke Davies, is really a powerful film with the scenes between the father and son only brought down and made boring by the other hour of veering off the course of their relationship. Do we really need to hear Perry Como singing “Sunrise, Sunset” from “Fiddler of the Roof” and taking us out of the picture for 3 minutes?

“Beautiful Boy” leaves you with a lot of questions that should have been answered in the unspooling of the film but instead leaving you with a bored feeling and asking why the two excellent performances of the male leads weren’t covered with a more in-depth story.
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6
Compi24Nov 13, 2018
Addiction dramas are always a chore. And that definitely seems to be the point. You're supposed to feel the frustration and desperation of the addicted characters involved. But I found this one especially frustrating for some reason. PerhapsAddiction dramas are always a chore. And that definitely seems to be the point. You're supposed to feel the frustration and desperation of the addicted characters involved. But I found this one especially frustrating for some reason. Perhaps it's the potency and resilience of the kind of addiction dealt with by the film's main character. Or it could be the overly understated performances and direction that made this feel as empty as it ended up making me feel. Either way, though the movie has a few memorable and even heartbreaking moments, I couldn't help but feel as though a more expressive and dramatic approach would've worked better. Still, a competent work overall. Expand
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7
moviemitch96Nov 3, 2018
This is a true story about a crystal meth-addicted teen and his father's strained relationship with him as he tries everything in his power to save him, and it was such an emotionally devastating film that I'm honestly hesitant to recommendThis is a true story about a crystal meth-addicted teen and his father's strained relationship with him as he tries everything in his power to save him, and it was such an emotionally devastating film that I'm honestly hesitant to recommend it. However, it really is powerfully delivered and acted, with Steve Carell and Timothee Chalamet giving tender and honest performances. It's a bleak yet important true story about about strength, hope, and family. There are some typical-feeling true-story moments, but the acting and the emotional devastation make it a tough yet compelling watch. Expand
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7
MattBrady99Nov 25, 2018
LIFF32 (2018) #5

‘Beautiful Boy’ is a melancholic look on parenthood and the tragedy of watching loved ones dissolve away under lethal drugs. Based on David Sheff novel (by the same name) which documents his son addiction. Hard to sink in,
LIFF32 (2018) #5

‘Beautiful Boy’ is a melancholic look on parenthood and the tragedy of watching loved ones dissolve away under lethal drugs. Based on David Sheff novel (by the same name) which documents his son addiction. Hard to sink in, but harder to forget.

Timothee Chalamet was magnificent in this movie and proves that 'Call Me By Your Name' wasn't just a fluke for him. Chalamet went in-depth in terms of preparation, such as: losing 25 lbs for the role and advice a doctor on set to ensure his acting as a drug addict was authentic - all his effort paid off beautifully. While Nick cause plenty of problem towards himself and his family, yet isn’t portrayed as some villain for the audience to hate, just humanized enough to understand his struggle.

However, I thought Steve Carell was the biggest stand out. While Chalamet had the most showy scenes and material for him to be more talked about, but Carell’s performance, in my opinion, was just more powerful. I think it’s the quietness and natural presence that makes him believable. By placing yourself in the parent shoes, it makes for a devastating thought. Whenever Carell yelled, I must admit, I heard Michael Scott from ‘The Office’, but that didn’t distract too much from his performance. When he cried, I cried with him.

The editing choices is quite bold, to say the least. Like take Jean-Marc Vallée style of editing, but set to overdrive - which is my biggest issue with certain cuts, especially at the beginning where it jumped between flashback and present day. After awhile it calmed down and show relevant scenes. Felix Van Groeningen approach to film making and writing brings a raw look on drug addiction while following some narrative cliches. Although I see this as an actors movie, as he allows the two leads to create their own characters within this world.

Also, the soundtrack-like structure didn’t bother me that much despite the handful of complaints from people. I view the soundtrack as a visually way of showing the character’s emotional state depending on the music choice.

Overall rating: It’s got flaws, but still translates novel into a visual powerhouse. Nothing like ‘Requiem for a Dream’, but convinced me to never do drugs.
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8
The3AcademySinsOct 20, 2018
Beautiful Boy is an incredibly realistic journey through addiction. If you have ever dealt with addiction yourself, or had a family member or loved one go through addiction, then this will be a very hard movie to watch. There really wasn't aBeautiful Boy is an incredibly realistic journey through addiction. If you have ever dealt with addiction yourself, or had a family member or loved one go through addiction, then this will be a very hard movie to watch. There really wasn't a dry eye in the house by the time the credits rolled.

The father and son relationship between Steve Carell and Timothee Chalamet is the core of the movie, and it really takes you through the peaks and valleys of that relationship. Timothee Chalamet gives a peerless performance. His description of what the meth does to him and how he is just so sad and "doesn't want to live in this reality anymore" really resonated with me. While Chalamet is the driving force of the story, Beautiful Boy is Steve Carrell's movie. He is a father who doesn't know how to help his son, and seeing his gradual degradation and enduring love is heartbreaking. The journey that these characters take together and alone is like watching a flowing, lucid river. Nothing feels unnatural. Something I appreciated about both of their performances and the movie itself was the use of silence. There is not a whole lot of dialogue in Beautiful Boy. If you saw "Call Me By Your Name" you will know Timothee Chalamet is a master of stillness and silence in acting, but Steve Carrell handles silence just as well, if not better.

My one flaw with the movie is that it definitely does start to drag. It's two hours long, and in my opinion it could have had the same impact and gotten the story across in 90 minutes. In spite of that, this is a must-see movie. I think it's going to be a contender for the Academy Awards this year. If I were to make a prediction, I think Steve Carrell will get a Best Actor nom, and Timothee Chalamet will get a Best Supporting Actor nom. If you do go see Beautiful Boy, bring tissues.
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9
bfoore90Mar 9, 2019
An incredibly realistic, tragic and searing looking at addiction and the toll that it takes the victims, their friends and their families. A Beautiful Boy is a must see
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8
alejandro970Mar 17, 2019
The drug addiction drama handled straight and fair in two view points: the addict and his fathers. Carell develops enough personality in this real life drama based on book of memories. For watch while singing the item song by John Lennon.
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9
goodfellas100Apr 3, 2019
This film should have won an Oscar for it's screenplay. It's a heartbreaking story of a loving father's struggle to help his addicted son. You will leave the cinema affected by the downward spiral of a talented son who finds solace in thisThis film should have won an Oscar for it's screenplay. It's a heartbreaking story of a loving father's struggle to help his addicted son. You will leave the cinema affected by the downward spiral of a talented son who finds solace in this mad world through drugs and alcohol. It is bleak and it should be. There appears to be references to Kurt Cobain throughout and the acting is just first class. I am a recovering addict myself and agree with the film's message that no matter how loving and well intentioned you are to help someone, the only person who decides whether they will survive in life or not is the addict. I am a survivor. Expand
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6
amheretojudgeJan 4, 2019
More Parenting Advice.

Beautiful Boy Groeningen's cure for this inevitable generation gap may be separated with mutual hatred, but somehow in its own incapabilities it beats to a toe-tapping rhythm. The decision to narrate the storyline
More Parenting Advice.

Beautiful Boy

Groeningen's cure for this inevitable generation gap may be separated with mutual hatred, but somehow in its own incapabilities it beats to a toe-tapping rhythm. The decision to narrate the storyline non-linearly is something that still is questionable. Yes, it gives them enough reason to fast forward or highlight the plot points, but then it looks like they were seeking for a reason to connect or communicate. Nevertheless, with heartwarming conversation and accurate description on both beauty and gore, it sails smoothly. The film is set in beautiful locations and is lit up bright and easy, no matter how much then the characters suffers vigorously. This contrast kept it mind by Groeningen is something to enjoy.

But all in all, the film ought to and does dwell upon the core relationship of Carell and Chalamet. A ride so raunchy and rugged that it breathes modesty more than innocence. On that very note, the film is a triumph. If it manages to scrape out last bit of innocence from Chalamet's account, then it breeds humbleness in Carell's. This vision that isn't compromised to glorify the characters or justify through logistics, shows honesty in filmmaking. But still there is a lot left in the court to wander about.

And this uneasy voids or untouched grounds is its primary weakness. The rest of the material is often meaningless and can easily be filtered out as a distraction. Yes, they do get their opinion or perspective in on the narration, but then it seems like either it is too late or inevitably irrelevant. Groeningen sets the scene beautifully, he smartly scatters little points on the screen to work your way up but when it comes to end one, he feels a bit short handed to live up to his excellence as it did on igniting it. Carell is not your overprotective guardian, he is the friends of friends.

He pushes the boundaries by not keeping one between him and his son. A mistake or a masterstroke, the film ping pongs this decision often in the film, diplomacy is appreciated in here. His tendency to keep nagging and poking through his rigid ideologies and also to be open mind enough to grasp the one dimensional nature of anyone, balances the tone to a humane version. Chalamet, the victim or so it may seem like, is frankly more convincing when sober rather than floating around in his imagination.

Their chemistry has a lot of pressure to fill in, which they deliver, it takes a lot of effort from them, but they do. The supporting cast has done a decent work although, Ryan feels a bit underused and surprisingly Tierney gets a big chunk of impressive role which evidently bodes well to both her performance and the track. There is very little mining on terms of the concept, it is happy to surf over it and decorate it with dramatic effects as much it can. Beautiful Boy is far from being a beautiful tale, it is essential for the awareness, but productivity is to be looked over.
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6
chapel_dwellerDec 13, 2018
This film, did start strong. But it found its self in a horrible cycle that mirrored the cycle of drug addiction. The film was interesting to watch but then became like a chore. It was very upsetting at times and the relationship betweenThis film, did start strong. But it found its self in a horrible cycle that mirrored the cycle of drug addiction. The film was interesting to watch but then became like a chore. It was very upsetting at times and the relationship between father and son is the for front here. I appreciate the incredible acting here and great cinematography but I wouldn't rush back and see it. This for me is a one time thing, but this isn't necessarily a bad thing. Expand
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7
GrantD243Jan 16, 2019
Beautiful Boy tells the story of Nic Sheff in a very realistic way, which I do appreciate. However, I found the story's emotional impact to be a little lacking, which I think it was relying quite a bit on, and as a result it made theBeautiful Boy tells the story of Nic Sheff in a very realistic way, which I do appreciate. However, I found the story's emotional impact to be a little lacking, which I think it was relying quite a bit on, and as a result it made the repetitiveness of the story less tolerable for me. Expand
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6
Bertaut1Jan 29, 2019
Earnest and heartfelt, but narratively awkward, and emotionally unengaging

Based on the memoirs Beautiful Boy: A Father's Journey Through His Son's Addiction by David Sheff (Steve Carell), and Tweak: Growing Up on Methamphetamines by Nic
Earnest and heartfelt, but narratively awkward, and emotionally unengaging

Based on the memoirs Beautiful Boy: A Father's Journey Through His Son's Addiction by David Sheff (Steve Carell), and Tweak: Growing Up on Methamphetamines by Nic Sheff (Timothée Chalamet), written for the screen by Luke Davies and Felix van Groeningen, and directed by van Groeningen, Beautiful Boy is a film about the horrors of addiction, told from the perspective of both an addict and his father. Focusing primarily on David's attempts to understand and fight against his son's addiction to crystal meth, the film aims for a no frills unsentimental authenticity, adopting a non-linear cyclical structure designed to mirror the repetitive nature of addiction-rehab-relapse-addiction etc. And whilst it's certainly heartfelt and respectfully told, there's little in the way of emotional engagement.

The most notable aspect of Beautiful Boy is the structure - the film is made up of a series of high and lows following Nic and David through relapse and recovery, whilst at the same time, there are multiple flashbacks, with scenes in the present giving characters occasion to think about moments from the past, often happier memories of Nic's childhood. The problem with this is that it's overused; there's barely a scene that doesn't have some kind of temporal cutaway, which dulls the impact of such editing, as after 45 minutes, you're just yearning for the film to stay put for a while.

As regards the repetitive nature of the story, I understand what van Groeningen was going for - it's supposed to mirror the two steps forward, one step back staccato motion of addiction. However, the film falls into a pattern of Nic showing up looking a little more dishevelled than he did before, followed by David doing everything he can to help, followed by his failure to get through to Nic, followed by Nic disappearing, followed by Nic showing up looking a little more dishevelled than he did before, etc. And whilst this may lend itself to a certain authenticity, it doesn't make for very effective drama.

On the plus side, with both actors giving superb performances, one really sees the bond between the two, and how much Nic's addiction is destroying both of them. In this sense, the real tragedy of his situation isn't the rehabs and relapses, it's seeing him drift further and further away from a man who would literally die to protect him.

With lesser performances, the film would have crumbled under the weight of van Groeningen's heavy-handed direction. Thankfully the performances are strong enough that the style merely distracts. Chalamet's is the more physical of the two performances, conveying so much via his body language as he alternates between playing Nic as a sweet, loving, almost immature teenager, and a stressed addict, old before his years, capable of anything to get money for his next hit. Carell, for his part, does most of his best work with his eyes, conveying the sadness and desperation he feels. His helplessness is written across his face, conveying how little he can actually do for his son.

Despite all of these positives, however, there are some significant problems. For one, van Groeningen chooses not to present some of the darker aspects of Nic's story. For example, he turned to prostitution at one point to fund his addiction. Additionally, as his hits from crystal meth continued to diminish over time, he started shooting it up, which is insanely dangerous. Leaving out aspects such as this gives the film a kind of sanitised feeling, as if we're looking at addiction through a gauze which the director refuses to pull back.

A film of this nature, detailing something like this, and based on a true story, should be an emotional rollercoaster, but the audience is always removed, the emotions are seen rather than experienced. Because the film introduces us to the characters mid-crisis, and because there's literally not a single scene that isn't either related to Nic's addiction, or a flashback from a scene related to his addiction, we never really get to know David or Nic outside this situation.

There have been some truly great films about addiction; The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), Days of Wine and Roses (1962), The Panic in Needle Park (1971), Drugstore Cowboy (1989), Trainspotting (1996), Leaving Las Vegas (1995), The Basketball Diaries (1995), Requiem for a Dream (2000). Beautiful Boy is absolutely nowhere near anything of this calibre. In fact, it's probably more successful as a kind of instructional installation for relatives of people going through addiction than it is as a film evoking emotions. And whilst it's definitely heartfelt, its lack of emotion, its repetitiveness, its distracting structure, all grate against the strong performances.
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7
LajaleaaJan 23, 2019
"I don't think you can save people. Nicky."
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( 73/100 ) . Recuerdo cuando vi Stronger (2017) con Jake Gyllenhaal: Llena de propaganda y con una carga de sensibilidad que apela extremadamente a la idiotez emocional de la gente. Beautiful Boy
"I don't think you can save people. Nicky."
.
( 73/100 )
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Recuerdo cuando vi Stronger (2017) con Jake Gyllenhaal: Llena de propaganda y con una carga de sensibilidad que apela extremadamente a la idiotez emocional de la gente. Beautiful Boy tiene la decencia de no ser una novela drasticamente melodramática. Dirigida por Felix Van Groeningen, quien es de Belgium y lo he visto lucirse en The Broken Circle Breakdown, la cual fue nominada a un Academy Award como Best Foreign Language Film en el 2014, Beautiful Boy, desafortunadamente, cae en las garras del servicio social de Hollywood. El director, quien adaptó el guión junto a Luke Davies, equilibra las emociones de la historia y nos presenta momentos de calidez y frialdad visual y narrativa con éxito.
Sobre la adicción y sus repercusiones en la estabilidad familiar, Beautiful Boy no quiere meterse en la complejidad del concepto y se enfoca en la transformación y vulnerabilización del entorno familiar ante las decisiones drásticas e impulsivas de uno de los miembros. A quien considero que es necesario resaltar en esa interacción es a Steve Carell, a quien jamás lo había visto más solido en una papel dramático, incluso después de verlo en Foxcatcher. Su esfuerzo es genuino y realmente le es fácil apelar a la figura paterna de la mayoría de las culturas. Yo no solo me identifiqué con él como persona, sino vi a mi padre en él y eso se me hizo muy conmovedor, no solo porque he visto esa actitud en mi padre, sino en los consejos y las atenciones que otras muchas figuras parentales me han dado: Padres de mis amigos. Por su parte Timothee Chalamet es supremo como siempre. Logra fluir con la complicada relación de la que está encargado construir y entre que impulsa a Carell y obedece a su guión, consigue adaptarse correctamente en las escenas. Fuera de las actuaciones considero que sí hay cierto atractivo fotográfico y cierta preocupación por la narrativa visual. Decoran y soportan la historia y las relaciones y evitan que la gente se distraiga o se confunda entre las sensaciones que la película trata de expresar. En resumen, visualmente es directa con el público y también bonita.
La historia también tiene sus propias moralejas, y aunque se pueden abrir debates muy interesantes con las filosofías, decisiones y resoluciones a las que llegan los personajes, al director no le interesa exponer posturas o resolver dilemas; prefieren solo contar una historia, y siento que eso le quita intensidad al proyecto en general; eso lleva a que la conclusión de la historia se sienta rendida y algo abierta. Entiendo que el tamaño de la lucha en la historia merece privacidad y paciencia, sin embargo no hay un mensaje o propósito en el cierre narrativo, y los letreros de propaganda simplemente no ayudan. Créanme, si la propaganda no hubiera sido la intensidad final y hubiera sido más ingeniosa y sutil, hubiera donado ese mismo día, pero realmente la película no merece más inversión de la que le di al comprar mi boleto de entrada. El problema no está en el contenido, sino en el contexto.
Personalmente buscaré el momento correcto para presentarle esta película a mi padre porqué se que él es más vulnerable a este tipo de publicidad y realmente le gustará, se encariñará y seguramente me lo agradecerá, pero si mi situación familiar fuera diferente, Beautiful Boy quedaría en la canasta de descuentos en cualquier Walmart. Pero hey, al menos vi a Steve Carell en su mejor expresión dramática.
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8
ThatFilmGuy20Jan 10, 2019
Beautiful Boy is a touching story that tells the pains and struggles from two perspectives, Steve Carell & Timothee Chalamet evoke a spectrum of feelings throughout the film, their relentless delivery offers a great insight into a dark worldBeautiful Boy is a touching story that tells the pains and struggles from two perspectives, Steve Carell & Timothee Chalamet evoke a spectrum of feelings throughout the film, their relentless delivery offers a great insight into a dark world where solutions are not really straightforward and often doesn't even exist, the film sends a painful message told from a different perspective then we usually see in this genre, but even though its light tone at times it stills feels powerful and honestly impactful in so many ways, I said this many many times, it's really hard to showcase pain on film, it takes a lot from an actor to be able to convey pain but both leads here we more than able to give something meaningful for us to think about.
Beautiful Boy examines a hard aspect of life that consumes the lives of families all around the world, each story is different, just like this one.
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10
ZJHFeb 5, 2019
Beautiful Boy this film shows a strong father-son relationship.It's touching,affectionate and attractive.This movie doesn't give you so much time to breathe.It keeps me focused from beginning to end(2h)and no movie can make me likeBeautiful Boy this film shows a strong father-son relationship.It's touching,affectionate and attractive.This movie doesn't give you so much time to breathe.It keeps me focused from beginning to end(2h)and no movie can make me like this.Timothée Chelemet and Steve Carell are like father-son:)I really love this movie so much,you guys must see! Expand
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5
tropicAcesNov 3, 2018
Much like dealing with a real-life addict, the film is aimless and repetitive, constantly teasing improvement and bettering only to fall back into its flaws. Could this be the point? Sure, but it doesn’t make for a good filmgoing experience...
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10
sassymahOct 17, 2018
The best movie I have seen so far in 2018. It is heart-wrenching, compelling, emotionally raw, and authentic. The acting from Timothee Chalamet and Steve Carell is strong and Oscar-worthy. Timothee is proving to be one of the best actors ofThe best movie I have seen so far in 2018. It is heart-wrenching, compelling, emotionally raw, and authentic. The acting from Timothee Chalamet and Steve Carell is strong and Oscar-worthy. Timothee is proving to be one of the best actors of his generation. It is a no-frills movie that illustrates the struggles and cyclical nature of destructive addiction, relapse, and recovery. It is beautifully directed and poignantly adapted from two memoirs. It also displays the emotional dynamic and turmoil of the father-son bond wonderfully. The cinematography is also top notch and captures the tone of the film. I am honestly baffled by some of the critic reviews. Beautiful Boy deserves a much higher rating. The film is honest and I empathized with the issues because the film explores the pain in such a real way. We witness how the addiction affects the entire family and how average people can be sucked into the black hole that drugs offers. It is relevant in this day and age to show the problems that relatable youth face. In most Hollywood films, we typically see the addiction melodramatically explored with individuals suffering from a specific trauma or living in abject poverty. In this film, we see the torment & despair of addiction powerfully & realistically explored within a middle-class family. Beautiful Boy is a must-see for everyone. It deserves Oscar nominations for Timothee Chalamet, adapted screenplay, cinematography, and directing. The movie is so much better than a number of the other acclaimed, flashy Oscar contenders of 2018. Beautiful Boy is candid and naturalistic. Not only does the audience get access to such fine artful filmmaking but also gets served with life lessons. Expand
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3
bataguilaJul 8, 2019
Aburrida, quiere ser un drama de novela. El timothy cae muy mal, y Steve de actor dramático esta vez no le salió
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3
Mauro_LanariNov 5, 2019
(Mauro Lanari)
WASP parents believe they can educate their son by replacing living with surviving, the essential with the necessary. The son disagrees and craves the nihilistic "cupio dissolvi". Refraining myself from spoiling the epilogue, a
(Mauro Lanari)
WASP parents believe they can educate their son by replacing living with surviving, the essential with the necessary. The son disagrees and craves the nihilistic "cupio dissolvi". Refraining myself from spoiling the epilogue, a film of a "revolting" superficiality ("L'Homme révolté", Camus 1951).
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7
BrianMcCriticJan 27, 2019
There is much of this film to like but the director struggles to take this material and be able to cover it without over simplifying it. Overall a high 7 a B+ (could have been so much more).
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6
section20mi6Apr 15, 2020
While acting is genuine, narrative sequence are lackluster and uneven throughout, proving to be ill-excited but well-intentioned.
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6
night4Jan 18, 2019
Incredibly boring, yet with some very decent acting. Chalamet is twice as good as Carell though. Carell was miscast.

Overall, meh.
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9
fmmFeb 12, 2020
Heartfelt, superbly acted, devastatingly realistic. Essential viewing for anyone acquainted with the grief of addiction and loss.
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6
JLuis_001Jan 7, 2019
Many people talk about Timothée Chalamet but frankly I find it a rather boring actor. Besides, he constantly has a face of annoyance in all his performances that ends up bothering me.

Beautiful Boy is a sober and well made film but also in a
Many people talk about Timothée Chalamet but frankly I find it a rather boring actor. Besides, he constantly has a face of annoyance in all his performances that ends up bothering me.

Beautiful Boy is a sober and well made film but also in a certain point, problematic, because the narrative involves a lot of repetition.
I cannot deny that that it's something that doesn't occur with adicts and their relapses, but it was necessary to extend it so much?
Clocking at 111 minutes, Beautiful Boy feels somewhat excessive but it manages to keep afloat and end up working satisfactorily because the director prints a nice style and above all Steve Carell is an excellent quality anchor making it clear once again that dramas come in handy for him.
He's super fun in comedy but in dramas he's incredible.

Nothing out of the ordinary but I can definitely recommend it.
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5
ArrisJan 5, 2019
Feels a little all over the place, and sort of badly edited at time but it was quite entertaining.
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