A24 | Release Date: July 13, 2018
7.9
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Generally favorable reviews based on 286 Ratings
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28
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8
KeithDowJul 29, 2018
Bo Burnham's 'Eighth Grade' is just as nuanced and sweet and achingly grounded in reality as one would expect from the Youtube star, comedian, and musician.

The opening monologue from Kayla, played by Elsie Fisher, posits that she has a lot
Bo Burnham's 'Eighth Grade' is just as nuanced and sweet and achingly grounded in reality as one would expect from the Youtube star, comedian, and musician.

The opening monologue from Kayla, played by Elsie Fisher, posits that she has a lot to say but nobody really to say things to. However, one quickly realizes that it's through these monologue-style social media vlogs that Kayla is really speaking to the audience, and in turn, the socially awkward and conflicted eighth grader that resides in all of us.

Burnham's crystal clear characterization of pubescent life is to be expected. His magnificent camera work, however, is very much a pleasant surprise. Numerous static shots are perfectly composed, while other times the camera's movement adds to the emotional zenith of a scene, such as the apprehension one would inevitably feel in joining a middle school pool party. Add to this a brilliant soundtrack and it's obvious that Burnham has a genuine knack for feature filmmaking, with hopefully many more projects to come.
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3 of 3 users found this helpful30
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9
The3AcademySinsAug 7, 2018
Eighth Grade is all at once harrowing, hilarious, grim, hopeful, lonely, joyous, a cutting portrait of the toxic relationship between technology and today's youth, and a beautiful character piece taking place in the worst time period ofEighth Grade is all at once harrowing, hilarious, grim, hopeful, lonely, joyous, a cutting portrait of the toxic relationship between technology and today's youth, and a beautiful character piece taking place in the worst time period of adolescence. While funny in that trademark eccentric, Bo Burnham style, so many scenes are very uncomfortable and are quite scary in fact! The emotional tone set by the shots and performances in this film are incredibly strong. As for Elsie Fisher, this is a breakout performance and she truly carries the movie on her shoulders. The critique of youth and technology is very well made, with such uncomfortably funny scenes such as kids not taking a school shooting drill seriously, or the fact that they are all isolating themselves in the depths of the internet will hit close to home for a lot of viewers. As much as things change, they stay the same however, as sex and masturbation are recurring topics in this movie. Sex is portrayed as both awkward, disgusting, and in one beautifully constructed scene in the back of a car, terrifying and predatorial.

Bo Burnham has made an excellent first film. Elsie Fisher carries herself and this film with intense vulnerability and grace. I will not be surprised if I see Eighth Grade popping up in the awards season this year.
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2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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8
TrevorsViewAug 2, 2018
Dear readers, surely you know that today’s youth carry a huge responsibility ahead of themselves that often goes against their personal commitment to please people, a struggle that stems from their pressures to fit in. It’s a difficult taskDear readers, surely you know that today’s youth carry a huge responsibility ahead of themselves that often goes against their personal commitment to please people, a struggle that stems from their pressures to fit in. It’s a difficult task to explore the crisis kids today face, yet first-time director Bo Burnham miraculously succeeded!

Although you first may wonder, “is this R-rated work teen-appropriate?” Well, for fair warning, most teenagers might be too young to maturely discuss the more adult content (language, blow jobs), although I still encourage anyone older than eighteen to watch Eighth Grade because it is filled with wisdom about what it’s really like to grow up in the millennial age.

Clever filmmaking tricks seldom strive to wow us, its most ambitious technique being its simple focus on the glowing screen of the protagonist, eighth-grader Kayla. After dad jump-scares her while she scrolls through Instagram, Kayla’s phone cracks quite heavily, and your view of her social media presence turns disturbed for the remainder of the run time. When not filtered through the internet, Kayla instead comes off as nothing short of awkward. No Hollywood plastering here: the intense facial focus amplifies Kayla’s countable zits on her face.

Her increased pressures compel Kayla to post a series of YouTube advice videos, one of which opens the feature much like the first scene of Annie Hall. She gives some great advice, including how the “school you” differentiates the “pool you” and the “movie you,” so you must reach out to let everyone know the full “real you,” a point she proves by going out to sing karaoke despite her nervousness. Then each video ends with her signature phrase, “Gucci!” Except does anybody watch her vlog? It doesn’t matter a whole lot anyway, because Kayla doesn’t make her videos because others need advice, but because she must hear herself think as she goes through these troubles herself.

Away from social media, Kayla follows a makeup tutorial in front of her motivational sticky note-bordered mirror, so that she can then post it on Instagram as a lame post-makeup-application “just woke up like this” post. Sadly though, it can’t compensate for her class voting her, “most quiet.” As her last week of middle school drags on, you look past her embodiment through significant mundaneness, particularly with how her earbud music overpowers her dad’s voice. True to that style, raucous sound plays before she enters dangerous territory of a birthday party seeing her swimsuit body.

To more brilliant results, the dialogue complements maturation through awkward conversations, such as Kayla’s hilarious discomfort of a blow job tutorial. Whether it’s the dabbing old principal, or how various social media platforms define middle schoolers from high schoolers, or the single most realistic first date on film ever, humor stays consistent. But then all humor stops suddenly altogether in a clear #MeToo moment that forces you to hold your breath out of fear. So, jokes aside, this complete ninety-three-minute outline of puberty development captures the entire transitional stage thanks to the perfect editing. You never lose track of time, even if the image lingers on Kayla’s disconnect from her father.

Although to be fair of what this movie does wrong, little is learned about one boy who has a crush on Kayla. Another guy Kayla adores also comes off too one-dimensional, along with the stereotypical class beauty queen Kayla idolizes. Though somehow, those three characters have stronger presence than God, who here is nothing but a big missed opportunity to express Kayla’s existential crisis, as evidenced by a meaningful but skimmed over scene when she prays out of tremendous conflicting fear.

Yet this generalization of certain teenage tropes works to its advantage as it makes you naturally want to avoid whatever traits you see. A fine example happens during a conversation Kayla has with the beauty queen’s mom; she focuses on the daughter instead of the mother, revealing Kayla’s ideal wants away from the generational gap. These tight facial closeups are the secret to showing the way kids at that age always believe eighth grade is the end of everything. Trust me, Kayla’s maturation process by the end strikes your feels hard, especially once you hear her father’s sincere monologue in front of a soft campfire glow.

I find it hilarious how earlier this year, Hollywood legend Steven Spielberg phoned in a celebration of reality through a motion picture meant to glamorize pop culture, yet here, a complete nobody creates a far superior work which truly does celebrate reality over technology. Therefore friends, I guarantee Kayla will help you remember eighth grade fondly from now on forward. Hang tight everyone, Gucci!
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2 of 2 users found this helpful20
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7
JLuis_001Sep 26, 2018
Middle school or high school can be a place of enormous pleasure in the memories of people who spent a great time there and it can be a hell of memories for those who had a hard time there. Especially the outcasts and those who sufferedMiddle school or high school can be a place of enormous pleasure in the memories of people who spent a great time there and it can be a hell of memories for those who had a hard time there. Especially the outcasts and those who suffered bullying.

Countless films have dealt with the subject and each one, depending on its release time, dealt with the typical problems of each generation. However, the youth of this last decade is in a way more intricate because it's a generation that lives perpetually attached to their cellphone and everything they do, they need to register it for the online masses.

Eight Grade shows that essentially and that is all that sustains it. Eight Grade deals with an obviously lonely and incredibly innocent young girl who makes videos giving motivational advice which is surprising considering that she's barely able to make friends.
I will not say that she suffers from depression but I do think she suffers from anxiety. We're seeing a girl without friends who lives an incredibly routine, day by day at her school with nothing remarkable happening to her. She has a crush on the typical bad boy who plays sports and obviously she's not within the grace of the ''popular girls''

Eight Grade is not a great story and neither is a great movie but the way it's done,
the way in which its young protagonist takes the baton of the story and frankly the situations that surround her are genuine, or at least they feel genuine enough. That's what makes it stand out on many other films that deal with a similar subject.
And maybe the best thing about it is that it gives us a main character who tries to make things work, who tries to adapt and make friends. She's not a young girl immersed in misery feeling sorry for herself and that's refreshing and even more so that despite the situations to which she exposes herself, she never betrays herself in order to fit in.
Applause for its young protagonist; Elsie Fisher who is the true revelation of this film.

Eight Grade is not a film that comes to innovate but knows how to make use of its strengths to take forward a story that remains relevant and is definitely a very good option for its generation and genre.

And by the way I have to say it out loud. The music was **** annoying.
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1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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8
starflyerboyAug 2, 2018
Burnham deserves praise for executing something that could have easily been terribly pedestrian but Fisher's earnest and delicate performance is what truly shines brightest.
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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10
crister17Oct 10, 2018
SO good! It was so real and raw, it felt like I wasn't watching a movie. Shed a positive light on self-confidence and self-worth. Learned a lot from this movie!
1 of 1 users found this helpful10
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10
fitzy226Jul 23, 2018
At times it feels like a sharply observed teenage comedy of manners, at other times it feels like a horror movie. Completely riveted by this film from beginning to end. Elsie Fisher deserves an Academy nod. Wonderful.
6 of 8 users found this helpful62
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9
GrantD243Aug 3, 2018
Eighth Grade is about a girl named Kayla who is at the end of her time in middle school and is getting ready to start high school. This isn't the story of some kid who has it all figured out or is extremely popular, though. In fact, this isEighth Grade is about a girl named Kayla who is at the end of her time in middle school and is getting ready to start high school. This isn't the story of some kid who has it all figured out or is extremely popular, though. In fact, this is the story that many people will find very relatable regardless of what generation you grew up in. If you had an awkward experience in eighth grade or if you weren't the most popular kid, you'll relate to this one. Sure, it'll probably speak more to current students or those that have gone through middle school during the 21st Century (as I have), but while technology has changed immensely over time kids only change so much. This film does touch the idea that technology has become a huge influence over the lives of kids these days quite a bit, and it portrays it in a very realistic way. I went through middle school before social media took over (Myspace and Facebook were just starting to gain traction), but cell phones were the hot ticket and many of the notes that this film hits on regarding social media were still very relatable to me. But the real story of this film is Kayla trying to become more confident in herself, trying to make more friends, and trying to work through how awkward the world seems to her at this time in her life. This film pulls no punches. It doesn't sugar coat anything and it doesn't make middle school seem better than it is like a lot of films and television shows do. It goes where you think it wouldn't dare go, and that makes it just that much better. There are some scenes in here that will make some people incredibly uncomfortable, but that's kind of the point. Eighth grade is an uncomfortable time, and it only makes sense for a film covering it to be uncomfortable at times. Elsie Fisher does a tremendous job as Kayla, and I have to assume that there's some of her in her portrayal as well because I believe she just finished eighth grade not that long ago, and Josh Hamilton (Kayla's dad) is solid as always. Yes, this film is R rated even though it is about a girl in the eighth grade. However, I wouldn't discourage parents from taking their kids to see this if they're of the appropriate age (around seventh grade or older). It's primarily rated R because of language, but there are some subjects that parents may flinch at when they're brought up in a film that their kid is watching. But, they're subjects that kids are going to encounter at school anyway, and maybe it'll even provide an opportunity for discussion after the showing ends. Everything about Eighth Grade is solid, but it's how the story will relate to people that really makes this a very worthwhile watch. Expand
3 of 4 users found this helpful31
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9
duddy5698Jul 23, 2018
The Positive:
Relatable
Acting Humor

The Negative:
Sometimes painful to watch, which might affect your enjoyment
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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10
In_a_senseAug 8, 2018
Astoundingly grounded, and painfully realistic are the two phrases in which sum up this film perfectly. Out of every horror film that I've watched, every jumpscare I've flinched, and every bloodspill I've cringed, this is the film that I'veAstoundingly grounded, and painfully realistic are the two phrases in which sum up this film perfectly. Out of every horror film that I've watched, every jumpscare I've flinched, and every bloodspill I've cringed, this is the film that I've looked away the most. There's almost a beauty in an aspiring director who has made, by just using the fear-inducing forces of reality to make us cringe, worry, and just wish to walk out the most. The feeling of being trapped in a harsh reality is so strong, and so crippling, that when Eighth Grade finally gives you some time to breathe, it feels heaven-sent. With an astonishing breakthrough from writer director Bo Burnham, and a flawless, realistic depiction of fear, anxiety, and doubt that nearly everyone is forced to endure at the specified time period, Eighth grade is surely one of, if not the best film of the year. Expand
1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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8
Brent_MarchantJul 22, 2018
Despite a slight tendency toward being episodic, this insightful look at an awkward time in one's life at an unnerving time in history wins the day with incisive humor and an ever-present though reluctantly acknowledged edginess that speaksDespite a slight tendency toward being episodic, this insightful look at an awkward time in one's life at an unnerving time in history wins the day with incisive humor and an ever-present though reluctantly acknowledged edginess that speaks plainly to viewers of any age. Newcomer Elsie Fisher delivers a knock-out performance, backed by a terrific ensemble of supporting characters who help to bring out the best in her portrayal. You won't regret your time at the theater with this one. Expand
0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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7
section20mi6Nov 4, 2018
The film doesn't have a big story to tell, but internal struggles of the main character can be perceived through all the scenes.
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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10
ayrkzamiskeNov 19, 2018
So amazing and important. A great portrait of our times. Good to understand the youngest of now. Miss Sunshine of this decade.
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8
LegendaryLassDec 14, 2018
It bounces between fun, terrifying, hillarious and horrifying... much like eighth grade itself does. Kayla is a perfect vessel for the audience through the wonderful nightmare of middle school and Fisher is a revelation.
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9
Lambo442Nov 17, 2018
A really funny, touching film, superbly acted, especially by the lead who's just so believable. Gave me an insight into an experience that I never would have had otherwise. Every parent should watch this film to see what their kids go throughA really funny, touching film, superbly acted, especially by the lead who's just so believable. Gave me an insight into an experience that I never would have had otherwise. Every parent should watch this film to see what their kids go through at this age. Having a loving, caring parent in your corner at such a time in your life is so crucial Expand
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10
NavyBeanJan 16, 2019
I am emotionally shattered at the beauty of this movie. It's the best movie about growing up I've ever seen. Elsie Fisher is a GD genius. And if I was Bo Burham I'd probably retire, because it will be neigh impossible to reach these heightsI am emotionally shattered at the beauty of this movie. It's the best movie about growing up I've ever seen. Elsie Fisher is a GD genius. And if I was Bo Burham I'd probably retire, because it will be neigh impossible to reach these heights again. What a film. What a film. What a film. What A film! Expand
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10
MattyiceOct 6, 2018
While lacking a true plot like many A24 films, Eighth Grade succeeds in fantastic ways with its fantastic characters and acting, engaging story, brutally realistic capture of middle school life, realistic writing, and solid cinematography.While lacking a true plot like many A24 films, Eighth Grade succeeds in fantastic ways with its fantastic characters and acting, engaging story, brutally realistic capture of middle school life, realistic writing, and solid cinematography. The main character of Kayla hit me personally on so many notes and probably many others, which makes the film all the more special. Director Bo Burnham obviously understood exactly what modern middle school is like in a better way than most who try and succeeds where other modern coming-of-age stories/timepieces, like Boyhood, fail. Expand
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8
WaelFeb 1, 2019
A heartbreaking, but realistic, take on the adolescence of Generation Z, and the addiction to social media, "Eighth Grade" is a very nice film consisting of a small cast, led by the amazing Elsie Fisher who plays the role of the Kayla, anA heartbreaking, but realistic, take on the adolescence of Generation Z, and the addiction to social media, "Eighth Grade" is a very nice film consisting of a small cast, led by the amazing Elsie Fisher who plays the role of the Kayla, an eighth grader struggling with anxiety and loneliness, making Youtube videos, and dreaming about a better high school experience. The movie also delves into themes of mental health, sexuality, and consent. "Eighth Grade" is a must-watch for teenagers, and even adults, for how relatable and how raw it is. Expand
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7
Compi24Aug 7, 2018
Writer/director/comedian extraordinaire Bo Burnham comes to us with a "funcomfortable," endearing, and at times frustratingly real portrayal of a pivotal, yet underrepresented era in human development. Featuring a handful of standout,Writer/director/comedian extraordinaire Bo Burnham comes to us with a "funcomfortable," endearing, and at times frustratingly real portrayal of a pivotal, yet underrepresented era in human development. Featuring a handful of standout, naturalistic performances -- with the most notable performance of course coming from breakout star Elsie Fisher -- some terrifically subtle storytelling techniques, and a solid vision from the gifted entertainer behind it all, "Eighth Grade" is easily one of the year's better indie efforts, and one that should be seen by many. Expand
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8
BrianMcCriticOct 9, 2018
A film that connects with its audience by conveying a feeling of real genuine life. The lead character Kayla comes across as exactly how an eighth grade girl might feel and that is the biggest complement I can give to a film like this,A film that connects with its audience by conveying a feeling of real genuine life. The lead character Kayla comes across as exactly how an eighth grade girl might feel and that is the biggest complement I can give to a film like this, nothing fake all real. Overall this is a solid 8 an A-. Expand
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8
moviemitch96Jul 28, 2018
An 8 for 'Eighth Grade!' I don't know how he did it, but famed Youtuber and comedian Bo Burnham truly triumphs with this gem of a directorial debut! Between his confident sense of direction for all of the actors and scenes to Elsie Fisher'sAn 8 for 'Eighth Grade!' I don't know how he did it, but famed Youtuber and comedian Bo Burnham truly triumphs with this gem of a directorial debut! Between his confident sense of direction for all of the actors and scenes to Elsie Fisher's relatable and completely natural performance, this is one teen/school flick that really hits home in more ways than one! At times, it might just make your heart ache for these characters and their certain situations, but it's also almost guaranteed to put a smile on your face at least one time or another. Overall, yes it can be cringy and feel a little too familiar at times, but that's just the sheer honesty and realistic style of the film talking most of the time! Expand
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7
MattBrady99Jan 1, 2019
"Growing up can be a little bit scary and weird."

'Eighth Grade' is an honest and relatable look on growing up. Almost hard to watch at times, but dose an excellent job of making you feel for the protagonist. Embracing it's cringe that many
"Growing up can be a little bit scary and weird."

'Eighth Grade' is an honest and relatable look on growing up. Almost hard to watch at times, but dose an excellent job of making you feel for the protagonist. Embracing it's cringe that many people, including myself are familiar with.

Bo Burnham perfectly captures the teenage phase with awkward close-ups and the camera focused on Kayla which shows her isolation. Who would've predict a comedian now acclaimed director.

Elsie Fisher (the coolest girl in the world) is so incredible that I completely forgot she acting. Before she was unknown, but now consider herself known after this. Also Josh Hamilton is fantastic as Kayla's lovable dad. There is not a single performance I did not buy in this movie.

By the end, despite the misery and the unfortunate, there is light in the most difficult times.
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8
justwibiOct 6, 2018
what a honest film from Bo Burnham for the condition of kids in this moder day. Played by "Agnes" from Despicable Me. LOL
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9
DavidWasHereOct 28, 2018
OKAY STORY TIME: I was a senior in high school when Lorde's Royals topped the charts. So much of media aimed towards younger viewers and audiences may come off with the delusions that they get us, but often they come off like a shirt atOKAY STORY TIME: I was a senior in high school when Lorde's Royals topped the charts. So much of media aimed towards younger viewers and audiences may come off with the delusions that they get us, but often they come off like a shirt at Walmart with #Relatable printed on the front. So when there was a ton of hollow pop songs trying to say "This is you and therefore this is for everyone," here's this New Zealand girl, around my age range, who came right out of nowhere with a smash hit against the norms about being broke and living in a nowhere town but still they wanna party it up with the rich crowd because who wouldn't, I was like "Yes! Finally! This is me!" And then I listened to the album it came from, Pure Heroine, and I was hooked and sucked in with songs like Tennis Courts and Team and White Teeth Teens and ESPECIALLY Ribs, I just felt like someone who is still young finally gets it! It might seem like a weird way to write this review, but let me just say that watch Eighth Grade just made me say "Yes! Finally! Someone gets it!"

Roger Ebert once wrote about the adaptation of Ghost World (which you should go watch) and said that he wanted to hug that movie. This is exactly how I felt about Eighth Grade. I wanted to hug Kayla and tell her that it's going to be okay and that she is absolutely wonderful...only to realize that as a grown man that's creepy as **** VnV This effect of emotion and caring largely came from the main brains behind this wonderful film, Bo Burnham (an absolutely hilarious comedian and a very talented man at that) just nails that type of honest emotion. It relies a lot on cringe humor with teachers dabbing and the intense fear of socializing with the cool kids who do not like you, but it all works because not only is it funny, but you also can relate to it. There's no artifice with overly stereotypical characters, it feels like real people having real discussions and the real feeling of happiness and white knuckle feeling of "Oh God I just embarrassed myself in front of everyone!" Seriously with all the uses of "likes" and "ums" and the use of social media in a natural way, the script is absolutely amazing! It makes the highs all the more high, and the lows all the lower. Like it has been a while for a film to make me feel that sinking feeling in my stomach like the car scene. There's an immediate comparison to be made for the films John Hughes made in the 80s like the Breakfast Club and Pretty in Pink, which is a totally legit comparison, but the movie it most reminded me of is last year's Lady Bird, where I never felt like I was watching actors but real people in this real scenarios saying totally real things!

The acting is also amazing too. Everyone in this movie is great. Literally no bad performance! Elise Fisher (mostly known for doing the voice of one of the girls in the first two Despicable Me films, so this is a real upgrade) carries this film! She is honestly terrific with this role and she makes you care for this girl, again it doesn't feel like an act but a real girl in middle school. Josh Hamilton is also great too being the awkward dad and him and Elise have terrific and believable chemistry. And that's the key word here, believable. I didn't feel like anyone was faking or over-dramatizing their roles! I didn't see actors, I saw people!

The only complaint is that while Bo is a great writer, as a director it does feel a little rough. The movie goes for a naturalist approach, not exactly being polished but filming in a way where it feels more like voyeuristic approach (voyeurism isn't the right term but go with me), where you feel like you are there with the characters and not done like it would be in a professional film with tripods and steady cams and whatnot. Which can certainly work for the realness of the film, but there were points where it can feel a bit stagnant and lacking in variety. But I feel that what we've got from Bo for his first outing is still great and there were some shots here that felt like he knows what to do in terms of the film language, so hopefully over time he will learn more from how to make a film.

Overall this is just a really good movie and I absolutely love it! Highly recommend it! I might bump it up to a 5 upon a second viewing, but either way no film this year has hit me in the same way this movie did!
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7
IzagoNov 13, 2018
Um om filme que conta a historia do inicio da adolescencia no final de seu nono ano, trilha sonora muito bem colocada, atuação boa,um bom filme.
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10
MasterRileyMar 22, 2019
Eighth Grade is a coming of age movie that depicts the anxieties of growing up to a T. While eighth graders can definitely relate to this movie, its themes easily relate to adolescents of all ages. The lead character Kayla (played by ElsieEighth Grade is a coming of age movie that depicts the anxieties of growing up to a T. While eighth graders can definitely relate to this movie, its themes easily relate to adolescents of all ages. The lead character Kayla (played by Elsie Fisher) gives such an authentic performance you cannot help but like her and understand what she is going through. Her dad in the movie (played by Josh Hamilton) also gives such an authentic performance and really comes off as a funny and lovable father who just wants the best for Kayla. The rest of the supporting cast is great, but it is Kayla and her dad's relationship specifically that grounds the film and provides the most emotional and gut punching moments in the entire movie. If you can relate at all to the characters, there are some truly memorable moments that will affect you. Expand
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8
michaelinpersonSep 28, 2018
A bunch realistic, and is a movie we, as an audience, can put ourselves in.
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10
Sangeet1995Jan 2, 2019
A refreshing take on anxiety depression and sexual consent among teenagers. A feel good masterpiece that linger in ur heart
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8
benthekingSep 4, 2018
An intriguing description of youth. It feels oddly relatable, more than it probably should be. It is executed with an acute sense of direction and brilliant performances, especially by breakout star Elsie Fisher. Easily one of the best moviesAn intriguing description of youth. It feels oddly relatable, more than it probably should be. It is executed with an acute sense of direction and brilliant performances, especially by breakout star Elsie Fisher. Easily one of the best movies this year. Expand
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9
ViniciusBritoJan 1, 2019
"You can't be brave without being scared"
Kayla is in her last year of the middle school, and she is known as been a very introvert person that doesn't have many friends, spend a lot of time on internet and not actually having real
"You can't be brave without being scared"
Kayla is in her last year of the middle school, and she is known as been a very introvert person that doesn't have many friends, spend a lot of time on internet and not actually having real relationship, and than she decide that she wants things to be different and face some challenges trying to find some experiences, doing that she also put her vlogs on internet looking foward to give people some advices. Directed and written by Bo Burnham.
The great about this movie is that it teaches you, didactically in a very natural way, a lot about living the life, from the perpesctive of a teenager, wich for a lot of us, still have situations that are really close to what they go through. In this story we can get perfectly how it is to be like one of them, in the minimum details, the subtleties that the character of Kayla is nothing but perfect, wich is a lot of points for the director, Bo Burnham and the actress Elsie Fisher, the way that she tries to speak to others and fail, the way that she is always looking down to speak to almost everyone, the shy, she been somewhere with people talking, even know that she got invited to do it so, but she just don't feel comfortable on it, all of that is so relatable and real, simple and real like few things in Hollywood are.
The lessons from Kayla's videos are: 1st - Be yourself: Of course, we gotta be ourselves and accpet that all the time to be happy, the situation is that sometimes we even think that we are someone that we actually aren't, and that happens with Kayla there. Another lesson would be: Putting yourself out there: and also, of course, you gotta expose who you are, talk to people, and that is so important, because met new people are essential for life, and you never know who you gonna met, and that is perfectly showed in this film. Confident, is important for you to be confident to all of the things in life can go well, the movie is good in letting us know that is normal and good to be afraid, you just gotta go on.
The fact that you really care for the main character in here is essential, and you can see that she is learning a lot and risking a lot, doing different things that she isn't usual to, and you all the time is cheering for her, and the movie is also real in the sense that the things that happens, actually are true and somethings go well and some doesn't, that every action ends up in a consequence, and some of these consequences can be horrible, no one is perfect, the movie pretty good in showing us that, nothing is perfect and there a lot of scary things around there. Letting us know that the worshiped people aren't necessary the better people to be with, there are people that can be way more fun and aren't so hyped by others, always try the different.
In acting there are some really good content in here, Elsie Fisher with only fifteen years old is already giving some really good work out there, she is great in this movie, she could interpret the shy person perfectly, you can totally see in her the lack of confidence in some moments and the need to get friends and to make contact, but just being unable to do it so, the anguish is felt in her, she can also be very kind, and have different layers in voice and in other aspects, she is great. Josh Hamilton is also great, overall in the movie he did worked exactly how a father would, accepting the childern's moment, but always with a bigger tie of concern, and i totally believed in him, in his concern, and he also have a really good monologue at the very ending, really touching. Jake Ryan is really nice in this movie, he portrays the perfect match for Elsie's character, he is kind and fun.
The soundtrack is on point, it does have a hope moment when things are getting better for the character, and the lack of track in some moments i also found pretty well used, it helped to give the perfect situation for the moment.
The photography is also good, there are some plans that can really help us in understand the scene. The movie works with the technologies that are used by the people in that age really well, and the photography works quite well in this aspect, there are one or other moment where it may get to polluted. There are one or another moment where things get in slow motion and not really pretty in what they do, i found some of these goofy, but overall it worked.
Eighth grade is a fantastic movie, one of the most real movies from the year that can have wonderful teaches to people that are in that age range and also for everybody else, because knowing ourselves is a thing for life, we are always changing and always gotta be aware of what is going on, being respectful and understandable or apprehensible.
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10
imanzbrjdJan 2, 2019
It was really well written and acted and really good in showing puberty, anxiety, and all that middle school problems. I felt so connected with the main character cause i pretty much exprienced all that problems. All that anxiety and timidIt was really well written and acted and really good in showing puberty, anxiety, and all that middle school problems. I felt so connected with the main character cause i pretty much exprienced all that problems. All that anxiety and timid moods. And i can say i'm still having some of those problems. I can say i'm a social outcast :)) And you know what? Unlike Kayla, sometimes it feels good. So this is a movie that i think most of you people will feel connected. Btw, the dad was amazing. I wish I had a dad like that. I love my own dad but man that guy was something else.
So,this movie is hilarious. One of the best movies of 2018 with no doubt. Just watch it dammit. Just watch it.
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8
whoischarlotteOct 23, 2018
This has to be the most stressful and real middle school movie I’ve ever watched. It’s this generations coming of age story. Gucci.
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7
eberman123Aug 12, 2018
This film successfully mirrors the world of eighth graders. The acting, script and direction are good. Recommended
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10
coolman1026Aug 15, 2018
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. A movie every teenager needs to see.

Bo Burnham in his silver screen debut amazed me, astonished me, humored me. "Eighth Grade" is contained with moments that most will relate to, or if you are the counter-parts to Kayla–including the "popular & stuck-up types", the "raging hormone boys", the "nice guy", and others– maybe those are some characters that will cause regret inside of you due to their certain characteristics that you may have shared with them. However, without the surrounding characters the movie wouldn't have its remarkable charm and realism. The shot selection in this film was some of the best that I have seen so far this year. Burnham's wit, anxiety, and humor leaked onto the film through his use of the camera. Two scenes in particular in where the shots used perfected the scene. In the swimming pool scene where we dolly out from a close up to an extreme wide of the entire pool where Kayla is at the top of the frame awaiting the solid wall of terror. Each second of sheer horror for Kayla is amplified by the booming trumpets, and as we witness what Kayla witnesses in a short, yet powerful moment of what she has to encounter. The other scene is the truth or dare game. The uneasiness and worrisome nature of this scene is strongly felt. The decision to keep Kayla in the foreground was key and the lighting to keep Riley in the dark gave him an aura of maliciousness. While watching this scene I was getting worried for what was going to happen to Kayla as each piece of dialogue was further going down a path of "please don't let it get worse". This was the first A24 film that I have watched, I have watched Lady Bird recently, which is also a fantastic film. A24 seems to know the perfect formula for coming-of-age movies, the authenticity of its writing. In both films it felt like I have been in some of those situations that were presented in both films. But sticking to Eighth Grade the writing was authentic, genuine, real. Alongside with the oscar-worthy performances from Elsie Fisher and Josh Hamilton. Highlights for me, these three sequences that are unforgettable. First, is the banana sequence, I can not remember the last time I have laughed in a movie theater so much. The absolute insanity that is the moment to moment revelations for Kayla and her futile attempts to "practice" as soon as her dad shows up to end charade. Second, the burning of the time capsule. Some of the best acting in the entire movie is in this scene, but not only that but the weight that the "burning of all hopes and dreams" symbolizes. Speaking on behalf of other kids where they may have felt the same way. At the bottom of the bottomless pit. And finally the third, the ending sequence starting from the graduation and ending at the ending. The culmination of all of the advice videos that were made throughout the movie to get Kayla to gather the courage to set Kennedy and her friend straight, Kayla making a new time capsule and video for her future self. The movie didn't end with a "happily ever after" ending which was great, because in real life that never happens and in real life we encounter things that we regret, don't want to do, and things we need to do. Eighth Grade is the best film of the year so far and I hope it stays that way until January 1st of next year, unless mid90's or Boy Erased top it.
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8
amheretojudgeOct 16, 2018
deserves much higher grade..

Eighth Grade Burnham's candid version of the current generations that chisels out art through commercialism, is the tap that not only they, but we all need. Holding no bars, this venture is definitely not for
deserves much higher grade..

Eighth Grade

Burnham's candid version of the current generations that chisels out art through commercialism, is the tap that not only they, but we all need. Holding no bars, this venture is definitely not for everyone. And not because of the gut-wrenching and bold decisions that it takes while exploring the characters, but the peeling of the nature in front of the audience which is cringeworthy to encounter. And it's that nakedness that Burnham isn't and shouldn't be shy about. Conveying the aspired message through a teenage psychology and no other perspective above it, it is a sweet home run on terms of getting that message written on banners that is loud and clear for all generations. The characters are three dimensional and genuinely real to a point, where you feel embarrassed on observing their day to day life since it feels like we are unnecessarily poking our nose in, on someone's life; YES, it is that real. It is often presumed, that too much accuracy and practical approach may extract out the cinematic experience, but if kept alive on screen in each frame with such ninja-like awareness, the euphoric energy never fades away. And this dose of exhilaration is in plethora and yet still it doesn't grow flat. The primary key to it, would be to foliate each emotion through its own tone, so that if there are ups and downs, it should sound reasonable and not mere compromise. Fisher is natural. She holds back emotions and expresses that with such buoyant nature, that it keeps giving you back what you expect it from, no matter what they say, she is "cool". The narration is neither elaborative nor adaptive, it is gripping and undoubtedly correct, now "correct" sort of script isn't something that is easily available, but we have a gold mine over here. And Burnham is well aware of it, he never takes his potential of the concept for granted, his execution is much more powerful than the script. His off screen presence can be felt by his sensational work with the help of an amazing cinematography. Not only the conversations written are pragmatic, but they are performed too with such accuracy that it can leave your head spinning. Overlapping of arguments, petty ideologies, different priorities among kids and the frame of reference that is bizarrely genius in here, are these tiny notions that amps up this 90 minute act. Burnham narrows down higher concepts to such simple terms, that you can feel the stakes with equal emotions that the character might be going through with, like when Fisher is about to open the door and join the pool party. This humane analysis of glorifying each tiny moments is what makes this non-crispy tale into a highly pitched cinematic experience. It is a much, much mature idea that Burnham has taken in hand, and his grip is firm and fair to the storytelling. Eighth Grade deserves much higher grade than it claims to be in, strike off the walls, this is not an indie film.
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8
ahmedaiman9999Oct 2, 2018
Putting aside the unrealistically perfect character of Kayla's father (Josh Hamilton is fantastic, though) and some stereotypes that surround it, and a poorly-written subplot, Eighth Grade is an agonizingly accurate and authentic look atPutting aside the unrealistically perfect character of Kayla's father (Josh Hamilton is fantastic, though) and some stereotypes that surround it, and a poorly-written subplot, Eighth Grade is an agonizingly accurate and authentic look at life’s the most universally awkward phase thanks to first-time director, Bo Burnham's painstaking attention to detail, astonishing use of music that captures the spirit of the titular time period, and Elsie Fisher's breakthrough performance who played her role achingly well.

(8.5/10)
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10
nadiacloudSep 22, 2018
Great relatable flick. Even though it is R-rated, I recommend this for any age middle school and up. The surprising part that it is also great for highschoolers and adults.
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9
JDX_AwesomeAug 23, 2018
I’m a big fan of Bo Burnham. His two comedy specials are some of the funniest I’ve ever seen. What surprised me about this movie is that there aren’t any jokes in it. It’s not funny, it’s just incredible awkward, and all we can think to do isI’m a big fan of Bo Burnham. His two comedy specials are some of the funniest I’ve ever seen. What surprised me about this movie is that there aren’t any jokes in it. It’s not funny, it’s just incredible awkward, and all we can think to do is laugh it off. This is a good thing by the way. As someone who’s essentially lived in the setting of this movie, this is the perfect portrayal of it. This is one of greatest directorial debuts of all time, and I couldn’t be more impressed. Everything was amazing excepted for some of the shots, but that’s to be expected from a first time director. I really have no complaints outside of it being too accurate. I can’t gush about this movie enough. Expand
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10
Lizza25Oct 5, 2018
Great film. It shows that stage in adolescence when you think whatever is happening in your life is the biggest thing ever. The actress does a very realistic portrayal.
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9
Slovenly_MuseDec 31, 2018
A striking and empathetic portrayal of the "middle years" stage of growing up. At turns sweet, surprising, awkward, heartbreaking, and hopeful, it speaks to the perceived "weird kid" in all of us.
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8
CosiMOLOGOOct 22, 2018
Un tópico recurrente en el cine "indie", es mostrar el proceso de maduración y trance de adolescencia a juventud. Un buen ejemplo es Lady Bird, la película del año pasado que dió a Greta Gerwing reconocimiento en diversos festivales, eUn tópico recurrente en el cine "indie", es mostrar el proceso de maduración y trance de adolescencia a juventud. Un buen ejemplo es Lady Bird, la película del año pasado que dió a Greta Gerwing reconocimiento en diversos festivales, e incluso le valió cinco nominaciones a los Oscar.

Allí Greta explora la historia de una joven en el último año de preparatoria y la tensa relación con su madre, allí la historia se maneja básicamente por las tensas conversaciones entre madre e hija; acá las actuaciones logran transmitir todo, solo vemos a Kayla en sus actividades cotidianas y nos identificamos con ella, compartiendo todas sus dudas y problemas.

Elsie Fisher hace un gran trabajo interpretando a Kayla. Entra las películas de este estilo con temáticas similares, esta destaca por no quedarse en el cliché y contar la historia políticamente correcta, sino que además explora otras temáticas poco convencionales, pero igual de cruciales. Una película con un tinte cómico con una historia de aceptación, honesta y conmovedora. No se pierdan Eighth Grade.
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8
movieducationOct 26, 2018
Another "horror" hit from A24 - EIGHTH GRADE, that relatable feeling that you feel nothing can equal it. No class could teach you anything about growing up, but growing up ! It takes one to know one.
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8
harris1078Nov 29, 2018
It's rare for a film to capture the uncertainty and fragility of the 'tween' years as accurately as 8th Grade. Elsie Fisher's hesitating performance is excellent, and Burnham is an incredibly self-assured first time director. Lots of awkward,It's rare for a film to capture the uncertainty and fragility of the 'tween' years as accurately as 8th Grade. Elsie Fisher's hesitating performance is excellent, and Burnham is an incredibly self-assured first time director. Lots of awkward, cringe inducing moments, but it never dips into melodrama and wraps up in a satisfying way (unlike adolescence). Expand
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8
nmarty310Dec 13, 2018
Extremely well done for a plot line that could’ve easily tanked. And wow was that ever so relatable on multiple levels. Well done.
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8
mainstreamkidFeb 6, 2019
"I totally, like, get what you mean." - The Movie.

Eighth Grade can be a little bit hard to watch and that's only because how accurate and realistic it is.
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9
KpkpJan 26, 2019
What an awkward yet important coming of age film. This new generation is so unique and Bo does a great job of capturing it.
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8
zNeverSleepingAug 13, 2020
Um filme necessário.

A juventude nunca foi tão complexa. O longa de Bo Burnham tem o difícil trabalho de transpor a realidade de muitos jovens de uma maneira que não só quem simpatiza os possa entender. A discussão quanto ao "seu eu", inicio
Um filme necessário.

A juventude nunca foi tão complexa. O longa de Bo Burnham tem o difícil trabalho de transpor a realidade de muitos jovens de uma maneira que não só quem simpatiza os possa entender. A discussão quanto ao "seu eu", inicio precoce da vida sexual, isolamento social - devido as personalidades toxicas que encontramos no podre ensino fundamental- e ansiedade são muito bem retratadas aqui. Não há um apelo significativo para o drama. Na verdade, levei esse filme mais como uma reflexão do que tudo.

A interpretação de Elsie Fisher estava precisa. O vocabulário, modo de se expressar, gírias, ansiedade e aquelas cenas cujo seus sentimentos se resumiam aos seus olhos fizeram uma baita diferença. Josh Hamilton também chamou minha atenção no papel pai. Gostei muito da atenção que o diretor teve ao distinguir a visão da protagonista com a real - aquela que só percebemos com devida distancia temporal.
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10
Offworld_ColonyFeb 19, 2020
A really artistically sure and universally relatable film for all ages that manages to not feel low budget and is both of it's time (more than any film I've ever seen) and also timeless in its themes.

Beyond the obvious and initial reads
A really artistically sure and universally relatable film for all ages that manages to not feel low budget and is both of it's time (more than any film I've ever seen) and also timeless in its themes.

Beyond the obvious and initial reads about social media based on legend Bo Burnham, Eighth Grade manages to cover a hell of a lot of topics revolving around being on the cusp of adulthood and finding who you are, your boundaries and how to like yourself.

The YouTube segments are brilliant, as well as all the authentic social media presence and representation in the film, but moreover they are a brilliant device to allow Kayla to speak to herself, something which is evident part way through the film; as she discovers who and how she wants to be. Elsie Fisher is sublime, she delivers simultaneously one of the funniest performances and one of the most empathetic and realistic performances I've ever, ever seen. She had me laughing with every line reading and every tic and every stumble. I fully felt like her Dad in the movie.

The Father (looking like Bo Burnham suspiciously) and Elsie's conversation around the fire had me in floods of tears. I wanted to reach out and hug her so much and thinking about her purity and her honestly in that moment has me nearly in tears the day after thinking about it. And then at the end I was laughing and crying at the same time. It's an incredibly cathartic experience for anyone who went through a reasonably traditional schooling experience.

Bo Burnham directs this film like a film and not like a documentary, and yet it's intimate, it's not artless. The music is sublime. Underscoring what she doesn’t say. It’s us viewing her world in ways we know. The soundtrack punctuates perfectly and the pervading sense of anxiety and dread in every frame and in almost everything she doesn’t want to do. Anxiety is dealt with in a really earthen and subtle way, true but not triggering. The score underscores the paradoxes of both elation and dread and the film isn't without its dark scenes; when she’s apologising after not doing anything wrong it's so painful without being disgusting or twisted. We hope she isn't left with any scars. But what blossoms is the wonder of seeing someone who acts the way they want to because it doesn’t matter if she does well to others. But just to her. The film has the air of shortly looking back, not from the perspective of someone in the 8th Grade, but someone perhaps looking back at a time capsule and remembering which is why it's used as such a clever device int he film. It portrays the youth in a knowing but also a slightly heightened way, the kind of way memory works, like Bo Burnham looking back authentically.

I was interested as to where it would go and desired for no clichés, and in that it delivers largely, the film is focused on the moments between the drama, that are the real drama. And as a character study, it's so interesting to watch how things can compound and alter a person on a week by week basis. Or when you can't stand yourself, who you used to be, who you are now, and fear who you may end up being. That spongebob moment is a great silent offering of this feeling. And wonderfully and appropriately the film is utter cringe and reminds me of the time I didn’t know who I was with aplomb. It evolves to a person finding themselves. And who hasn't had to do that at some point? Eighth grade or otherwise. There's a moment during a later Vlog where in passing she mentions "...I don't know if anyone cares..." My Fiance just yelled "We Care!" And we do. And anyone who feels alone, should try and remember this.
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9
SKrypticOct 21, 2020
This movie is an incredible representation of how many introverted, or anxious people felt through middle school years, or eighth grade to be specific. I may have gone in thinking about Bo Burnham, and I very much suggest that you don’t makeThis movie is an incredible representation of how many introverted, or anxious people felt through middle school years, or eighth grade to be specific. I may have gone in thinking about Bo Burnham, and I very much suggest that you don’t make that mistake. Bo is an incredible writer besides being a very funny comedian, and I expected the writing to be a lot funnier than it ended up being. But that was okay in the end, as I had to continue watching for many other reasons. Elsie Fisher has incredible talent, that goes beyond anything I could have expected. By the end of the movie, she made me feel anxious and introverted through her acting, despite me being a fairly extroverted person. The awkwardness through this movie may not feel good at all, but it’s due to genius acting and writing that we are able to feel it. Overall I’m extremely impressed by the movie, and suggest it greatly. If you, however, are looking for a funny, lay low movie, you will never find it here in Eighth Grade by Bo Burnham. Expand
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