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'Saturday Night Live' Recap: Amy Schumer Returns to Studio 8H for the Third Time

The pre-midterm elections episode got extra political but also took on Elon Musk's Twitter changes.

Danielle Turchiano
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Amy Schumer

NBC

Amy Schumer is no stranger to sketch comedy, with her series Inside Amy Schumer running for four seasons on Comedy Central starting in 2013 and getting a surprise return on Paramount+ this year. She also hosted Saturday Night Live for the first time in 2015, again in 2018, and a third time on Nov. 5, 2022. 

Once again on SNL she used her monologue to deliver a short stand-up set, and since this episode was the last one before the midterm elections, she wasted no time reminding the audience what was at stake, but she made sure to put a personal spin on it.

"People love giving pregnant women advice, don't they?" she said, talking about her friend who advised prenatal yoga and her doctor who said you can't have sex for six weeks after delivery of her son.

She also talked about her husband, who is on the autism spectrum. "It used to be called Asperger's, but — this is true — then they found out that Dr. Asperger had Nazi ties, Kanye," she said.

"He never really lands a compliment with me," she said of her husband. "He tells me I look comfortable a lot. We have different love languages."

"A couple of weeks ago, we were sitting outside," she continued. "It looked like it was going to rain, I was feeling sentimental. I was like, 'Even though these past couple of years with the pandemic and everything have been so stressful, this time, being with you and our son, have been the best years of my life. And he just looked at me and said, 'I'm going to go put the windows up in the car.' ... We play the game, 'Autism or just a man?'"

Joining Schumer as a special guest for the evening was Steve Lacy, who performed "Bad Habit" and "Helmet" off his recent Gemini Rights album.

See below for the five most memorable sketches from Schumer's 2022 SNL episode.


Joe Biden's new midterm candidates

James Austin Johnson pulled his Joe Biden impression back out for a cold open sketch that saw the president addressing the nation just ahead of the midterm elections, noting that the Democratic party doesn't have enough "stars" (read: headline grabbers). So, he decided to make some candidate changes before ballots were cast, including bringing back Chloe Fineman as Marianne Williamson and Cecily Strong as Stormy Daniels, trying to battle Dr. Mehmet Oz with Guy Fieri (Molly Kearney), pitching rappers Tekashi69 (Marcello Hernandez) and Azealia Banks (Ego Nwodim) as senators, and putting Tracy Morgan (Kenan Thompson) in charge of student loan forgiveness.


Covid commercial

Sure, the virus makes you run down, feverish, and often unable to get out of bed, but SNL theorized that that would still be better than dealing with your family and your job, especially the way the world is going these days. So, those looking for a break from everything from jury duty to adult baptisms were told to get COVID in order to finally "take a vacation from all of life's problems" and "sit on the good part of the couch and watch all the Netflix I want to watch." The virus itself was described as "still kind of bad, but doesn't it seem different now?" Especially for those who are triple vaccinated. Obviously, the commercial was a parody and no real doctors are suggesting this, but it sure says a lot about the state of things these days that the five to 10 days someone is knocked out because of illness is the only way they can take a break.

"I got sick, but I also got paid for 10 days to never leave a blanket. Plus, I got a great story to tell people at work," Sarah Sherman's character said.

Then again, maybe the better answer is to just get COVID Always Positive At-Home Tests, which were advertised as coming with two pink lines already drawn on so people could fake it and take a break without the long-term problems.


A week in Twitter review

Elon Musk once hosted SNL, but that didn't get him a pass from being ridiculed after he purchased Twitter, publicly announced a content moderation panel to review banned accounts, decided to charge people for verification and not vet identification for verification, and fired half the workforce. That was a lot to happen in only a week's time, and that doesn't even take into account the advertisers and users who have been defecting. SNL opted to focus on the content moderation part, parodying its first group meeting.

Heidi Gardner and Thompson played "the only two Twitter employees who haven't been laid off" (yet), who heard the cases of those who have been banned. These people included a woman (played by Strong) banned for a hole pic, a Call of Duty veteran (played by Bowen Yang) banned for doxing someone, a scam bot (played by Schumer) banned for being a bot, and yes, even Donald Trump (played by Johnson).

"I won't do anything bad except maybe coup," Johnson-as-Trump said in his case for why he should be let back on Twitter.

Punkie Johnson also appeared on behalf of Black Twitter to reject Musk's $8/month plan for the blue check, fewer ads, and priority posts. "We'd rather cross our asses over to MySpace and get that poppin again," she said.


Cecily Strong on abortion rights

Last season Strong dressed as a clown to talk about abortion on "Weekend Update" and in this episode she tried on a trucker role to do the same because Roe v. Wade has gone to the "big pit stop in the sky." Using not-so-veiled language, such as describing drivers relying on their radios to warn each other to delete period apps and discussing taking a convoy across state lines to see a doctor, she tackled how healthcare rights have been under attack while politicians and some media alike have been trying to distract the public by focusing on soaring gas prices.

"The truth is, I have felt pretty helpless over the past year, and it's hard to know what to say to make other truckers feel better," she said. "So here's the thing I can say: There's one mother trucking thing we can do to fight for mother trucking freedom to make our own healthcare decisions, and that's vote. And I hope to hell everyone votes."


Big Dumb Hat

It's officially fall, and while that usually means the domination of pumpkin spice everything for a certain demographic, big hats are also in abundance. 

SNL used a sketch about big hats (starring Fineman, Schumer, and Gardner) to comment on the ridiculous things that certain white women do, including wearing oversized hats on beaches, in airports, and in Starbucks (where, if you see one, "you know it's going to be oat milk").

The hats were the way in, and the sketch started as if it was an ad for them ("The rim is perfect to touch so people see your big, dumb engagement ring," Gardner's character said), but very quickly it became about the women themselves, with Schumer's character noting she's "plant-based, except for this cow-based hat" and posts pictures of her wedding everyday, and Fineman's character sharing she named her kids Poet, Lyric, Story, Fire, and Arcade.

And of course, the sketch included them dancing with absolutely no rhythm, cuddling with a tiny dog, and having one of the hats just get progressively bigger. To bring it back to the election theme, though, it also featured the iimportance of voting by pointing out that the women who wear these hats are usually the types who seem like they didn't vote but do want the stickers.


Saturday Night Live airs live coast to coast at 11:30 p.m. ET / 8:30 p.m. PT Saturdays on NBC.